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Full text of "Western Graphic (July-Dec. 1900)"

4 



CALIFORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY 




D EDD7 imS27D E 



California State Library 



WESTERN 
GRAPHIC 

tJIn Illustrated Family Weekly of tf>e Sovithwest 



WITH WHICH IS C O N s o 

Old Volume XX 
New Volume IX. 



Old Volume XXVUl.jJ^ J 



DATED T II K L O 8 A N G K t K S S V N D A Y W O K L I) A N D CALIFORNIA 0 0 B 1 <) 

Price 10 Cents 



Los Angeles, Saturday, July 7, 1900. 




VIEW ON THE MIDWAY — PARIS EXPOSITION 



WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

<Jln Illustrated Family Weekly o/ (£e Southwest 

WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED THE 

SUNDAY WORLD and CALIFORNIA CURIO 

GEO. RICE A SONS, (Inc.) 

robubhsd every saturday morning at 
811-313 New High Street Telephone Main 1053 

fhTlltrO AT TMI tOS ANOILiS *OST OFFICi At SECOMD-CIA SS MATTM 

SUBSCRIPTIONS— Three Dollars a Ytar; or, Twenty-five cents 
a month, collected by Remittance Card system, all postage paid 
by the publishers. 

CONTRIBUTIONS— We pay cash for accepted contributions, 
those containing photographs for reproduction being most avail- 
able. The usual rules regarding manuscripts should be observed 
to insure consideration. 



She Editor's Say 

WEDNESDAY was perhaps the most dignified 
Fourth of July Los Angeles has ever had. 
There even seemed a dearth of the more 
violent kinds of noise, the small boy contenting 
himself with modest explosives.. The parade in 
the forenoon will stand as a model one to future 
committees. No better arranged or better handled 
procession was ever undertaken in Los Angeles, 
and the gentlemen who gave their time and ener- 
gies to the consummation of so excellent a dis- 
play deserve the hearty thanks of every citizen. 
Two hours after the parade had finished the 
streets were as deserted as on a Sunday, the 
crowds having invaded the seashore towns and the 
parks. But one serious accident marred the 
pleasures of the day — the killing of Arthur E. 
Harrington, one of the road racers, in the fore- 
noon. 

No political party ever met under such favorable 
circumstances as did the Republican National Con- 
vention in Philadelphia. The unanimous nomina- 
tion of both the candidates for the offices of Pres- 
ident and Vice-President was unprecedented. Mr. 
McKinley has earned, and well deserves, the com- 
pliment. The prosperity of the country under his 
administration alone merits it, without taking Into 
consideration his able conduct of our affairs of 
state during the war with Spain. There was a 
notable difference between the harmony of the 
Republican party at St. Louis, in the convention 
of 1896, and at Philadelphia. Last month every 
Republican was working for the strongest ticket, 
and there was a unanimous verdict for McKinley 
and Roosevelt. The latter has endeared himself 
to the people by his clean and honest administra- 
tion of such public offices as he has held, as well 
as by his bravery in Cuba. They are both strong 
candidates, politically and personally, and will 
gain in strength as the campaign progresses. 
,* .< .< 

A change has come over the spirit of the forces 
opposing the Czar's party in Russia. Nihilism, as 
it was twenty years ago, is practically ended. The 
party is smaller, quieter, and not at all violent in 
method. The gradual mitigation of the horrors 
of Russian exile and the rigors of Russian law has 
given this party less ground for its campaign of 
violence. The Socialists have also changed in no 
small degree. Once the most violent Socialist sec- 
tion in the world, the Russians have changed until 
they are much milder than their brethren of 
Western Europe. The revolutionists have com- 
pletely abandoned their militant attitude, and no 
longer endeavor to spread their ideas by the act- 
ive methods used by the Socialists of Western Eu- 
rope. The only plank in their party platform to- 
day is the education of the masses. When this 
great work has been acocmplished there will be 
but little difficulty in establishing the ideal So- 
cialistic state; so argue the Russian Utopians. The 
Socialists in Russia are not republicans. What- 
ever may be the weak points of the existing mon- 
archial form of government, they consider it to be 
at least as good as the French republican regime, 
for instance. The dream of many Russian So- 
cialists is a great federal republic, bound together 
in much the same manner as the States of the 
American union. Socialism has been gaining 
ground steadily in Russia of late, particularly in 
the rura' districts, thus proving that, though the 
methods made use of by the party leaders to bring 
over converts to their cause are eminently peace- 
able, they are none the less efficacious on that ac- 
count. 

. *Z . 

From the evidences of discord in the Democratic 
convention it would appear to a man up a tree that 
the Bryan boomers will not be able to put up a 
fight that will be even interesting. 

There is one point that Western Graphic would 
impress upon the board of freeholders in the mak- 
ing of the new city charter. It is the necessity 
for a provision for the beautifying of the ctiy by 
every means possible. Notwithstanding the unlim- 
ited resources of this country, from the ranchos, 
the mines and the oil wells, there is no disguising 
the fact that a large part of our prosperity is due 



to the presence of the tourist in ever increasing 
numbers; and as the years go by the advantages 
of surroundings will be more apparent in the 
patronage of the easterner. An example of short- 
sightedness was recently shown in Santa Ana, 
where by order of the town trustees magnificent 
shade trees were cut down on several blocks of 
pulic streets. In a country where Nature is so 
liberal with her gifts it is a crime to reduce our 
streets to barren walls and asphalt. It would be 
a good plan to enlarge the scope of the duties of 
the park superintendent to include the supervision 
of the planting and caring for the shade trees 
along our thoroughfares. Let a few dollars be 
spent in the ornamenting of the roadways, and it 
will come back many times over in the good opin- 
ions of our guests from every part of the world, 
t ,t ,< 

As the hideousness of the Chinese situation is 
uncovered by the sifting process of the news ser- 
vice, the feelings aroused in American's breasts 
can only be adequately described by the good old 
Anglo-Saxon word — fight. There are things that 
cannot be settled with money or honeyed apolo- 
gies, and if it is finally confirmed that a number 
of our citizens have been slaughtered by the slant- 
eyed Mongols, the United States should, if neces- 
sary single-handed, thrash the Celestials to a fin- 
ish. 



Penmanship of Notables 

CHIROGRAPHY and character have long 
been considered relatives under the laws of 
mind and matter, but there are so many 
conspicuous exceptions to the rule that students 
are often in doubt. For instance, the boldest sig- 
natures on the Declaration of Independence were 
those of the noblest characters. Although a num- 
ber of those great signers were cramped in their 
signatures. Washington wrote a bold hand and his 
signature to some extent betrays his admirable 
character. Franklin's character is reflected in his 
signature. The signatures of Hamilton and Burns 
are not wholly unlike their characters. 

Coming down to signatures of our own time a 
majority are suggestive of the men who wrote 
them. For instance, that of Alexander H. Steph- 
ens is in a small tremulous hand, just as you 
would look for in a man who never weighed one 
hundred pounds.. Bob Fooms wrote just, as one 
would imagine the rare old fire-eater would. 
Forney, Cameron, Greeley and Choate wrote in 
scrawls and their signatures were like pothooks — 
not much could be obtained of their characters by 
their cfiirography. Don Cameron appears to have 
entirely forgotten that one of the objects ot writ- 
ing at all is to convey ideas to the human mind, 
as not even the profound handwriting expert, who 
figures in so many courts, could confront tin' 
scrawl described as his signature without a feel- 
ing of awe. 

Among my autograph letters are ones from Jeff. 

A 

By 

TIIHKE were a dozen of us at the Swiss hotel 
who had planned to remain for a month or 
six weeks to enjoy perfect rest. The dozen 
of us was made up of Americans, Englishmen. 
French and Germans, and we formed a close cor- 
poration and would discuss nothing which might 
call out argument of a bitter nature. I don't re- 
member that any of us were invalids, but, on the 
other hand, no one was in such good health as to 
seek for a row when elbowed by an ill-natured 
tourist on one of the narrow paths. 

We had been at the hotel for a week when two 
travelers of note appeared. The one called him- 
self a Count and had a Bavarian name a foot long; 
the other claimed to be the son of an Austrian 
nobleman. They were not only noted for their 
titles, but for their want of baggage, their dress 
and their demeanor. In dress they were little bet- 
ter off than tramps; in demeanor, the Count was 
a swashbuckler and the Australian as mild as a 
dove. They claimed to be making a tour on foot, 
something after the manner of the knights of old, 
and both carried swords with, them. It seemed 
queer to us that two such men could have got to- 
gether, as they were opposites in everything, and, 
queerer still, that the son of a nobleman should 
be lackey and valet to the other, but our ring gave 
them but little attention until forced to. We had 
as good as ignored the pair, when the Austrian 
forced himself into our circle one evening to say: 
"Gentlemen, I desire a word with you. As for 
myself. I am not proud and do not care for public 
opinion, but with the Count it is different. He 
must be treated with respect and consideration. 
You have ignored him. You have not sought his 
acquaintance. He feels the slight, and he would 
fight with one of you to wipe out the stain. Which 
of you shall it be?" 

The speaker retired and left us looking at each 
other in amazement. We were men of peace — law- 
yers, editors, bankers and professors — and duels 



Davis, and several from Beauregard. Davis had 
a characterless way of allowing little sharp letters 
to straggle up and down hill, rather in accordance 
with the imaginary curved line of beauty than 
with the straight line commonly regarded as the 
line of beauty most appropriate to chirography. 
General Beauregard's signature is as distinguished 
and Frenchy as his three magnificent names, 
which he gives at full length. Wade Hampton 
veils his ferocious personality behind a rather 
pretty lady's hand, which some of his fair con- 
stituents might envy. George F. Hoar writes in a 
pinched sort of hand, like that of a New England 
"school marm" who sets copies to her pupils pret- 
tily, in the style of former days. B. K. Bruce has 
placed on record one of the most dainty and mic- 
roscopic round hands imaginable. His predecessor, 
Rosecrans. wrote a dainty hand, while old Spin- 
ner's signature looked as if a cyclone had struck 
it. 

General William Mahone, the great Virginian 
Readjuster, the possessor of what may be termed 
a lateral handwriting, if hand writing is a proper 
term to apply to a sea of broad horizontal dashes 
extending from one side of the paper to the other, 
with here and there a slight ripple of short, up- 
ward stems. Blaine's autograph is suggestive, and 
so is Joe Hawley's. The former's is bold an! 
distinct, all the letters being connected through- 
out. Hawley's is rounder and more graceful. 

If ever a signature could be received as indica- 
tive of the character of its owner it is that of 
Roscoe Conkling — "Grand, gloomy and peculiar." 
It stands out in the relief of the blackest ink from 
the paper. Scarcely two letters at the same an- 
gle, with intricate and grotesque flourishes every- 
where, it certainly gives expression to the mental 
ramifications of the great unknown, so far as they 
could be guessed at. It seems to say, "My mas- 
ter writes like no one else; I stand alone among 
signatures." 

General Sherman signed his name in strong, up- 
right letters, with two bold flourishes, just large 
enough to give emphasis to the whole effect. Sheri- 
dan's signature is as bold and dashing as one of 
his own fierce cavalry charges. Hancock wrote 
a beautifully clear and regular hand, which is un- 
fortunately disfigured and given a slight appear- 
ance of affectation by an unnecessary profusion of 
heavy downward dashes. Ben. Butler had a great, 
round, awkward schoolboy hand. McClellan wrote 
a good hand. Terry, the renowned Indian fighter, 
was punctilious in his penmanship, writing clearly 
and gracefully, without the least attempt at orna- 
mentation. Burnside contrived to make a half 
dozen words cover a whole page of commercial 
paper, and this not by any ordinary means, as his 
huge, scrawling characters, plain as those on a 
circus poster, seemed to literally chase each other 
down the page, or rather to be festooned over it 
like the clusters of a wild-grape vine. Logan in- 
scribed his name in a series of coarse black, up- 
right characters — it would be difficult to disasso- 
ciate Logan's chirography and its owner. 

Bluff 

Wheeler 

were not in our line. Even the three Frenchmen, 
who were supposed to be ready to resort to the 
code on the slightest provocation, didn't care to 
pick up the gauntlet. After considerable discus- 
sion it was agreed to continue to ignore the Count, 
and when the Austrian returned for his answer it 
was: 

"Tell the so-called Count that when we desire 
to make his acquaintance we will send him word 
by a bellboy." 

We chuckled over that answer for a couple of 
hours, or until the Count sent a formal challenge 
to one of our coterie named Graham, and added 
that as soon as he killed Graham he would take 
up the case of the rest. He meant to go right 
through the list and make a wholesale job of it. 
Here was business. Mr. Graham was a solicitor, 
and had never drawn a sword or fired a pistol. 
He would have knocked a man down for pulling 
his nose, but he didn't care about a duel. The 11 
of us insisted that he ought to accept and go out 
and kill the Count and save us trouble, but he 
couldn't see it that way. He had gone to his room 
to think it over, when the Austrian knocked on 
his door to ask whether he had selected swords or 
pistols, and to hint that he had best make his 
will. Graham protested that he had offered no 
cause for a challenge and didn't propose to fight, 
and after a while the Austrian offered to stand his 
friend. It was to be a for consideration, of course. 
The Count had killed seven men in duels and was 
a terrible fellow, but he might probably be brought 
to see that no insult was intended. He was given 
the sum of $250 with which to make the attempt, 
and after an hour or so it was announced that the 
Count had withdrawn his challenge. Graham 
didn't tell us at the time how things were settled, 
but we had an idea that he had sent an apology 

The next forenoon, as one of the Germans sal 
smoking on the veranda, the Count walked up anc 
down in front of him for a while and then haltec 
and demanded: 



G ^ m e of 

^ McAlpin J. 



Western Graphic 



3 



''Why do your puff your pipe like that when I 
am present?" 

"Because I am smoking," was the reply. 
"But I object to your smoking." 
"I have a right to smoke." 

"Ah! ha! So you would ignore and insult me! 
My friend will call upon you within half an hour!" 

The German was a merchant and not a quarrel- 
some man. He was badly frightened at the idea of 
a duel, and was for appealing to the law or start- 
ing for home. Perhaps it was Graham who gave 
him a pointer, for when the Austrian called to ar- 
range about the duel a matter of $300 changed 
hands and an apology was accepted. We talked 
matters over in our little circle and came to the 
conclusion that the Count was a terrible fellow 
and his idioms must be respected. It was hoped 
that two challenges and two apologies would sat- 
isfy him, but we were disappointed. It was hardly 
24 hours after the affair with the German before 
the man who had killed seven men on the field of 
honor walked up to a Frenchman named Lasquez 
and thundered at him: 

"Blood, sir, but why do you wear a snuff-brown 
suit in my presence!" 

"Can't I wear a suit of any color I wish?" que- 
ried the surprised Frenchman. 

"Ah! Then you defy me! Knowing that I hate 



Hill came down with $250 rather than fight a 
duel, and it was plain that the pair meant to take 
in the whole dozen of us before they had finished. 
We were holding a little meeting to decide on 
some new line of conduct when an American 
named Scott arrived by train. At home he was a 
railroad builder and had known all sorts of men, 
and you had only to look at him to size him up 
as a man who wouldn't take "sass" from anyone. 
As soon as he had heard our story he abused us 
for a lot of cowards, and then said he would take 
the affair off our hands. Next morning after 
breakfast the Count and his pal paced the veranda 
with cigars in their mouths. Scott waited for a 
few minutes and then began to pace in their di- 
rection. He passed and repassed them wihout 
seeming to see them, and presently the Count 
halted in his path and shouted: 

"You boor, but where are your manners! When 
you meet a nobleman why don't you uncover?" 

"I do not take off my hat to either noblemen or 
loafers!" quietly replied Scott. 

"Blood! Blood! I will have blood for those 
words!" furiously exclaimed the Count. 

"Then you'll go to a slaughter-house and buv 
it!" 

"You — you will fight me!" 

"With the greatest of pleasure. Am I to under- 




YOU WILL BE DEAD IN ONE HOUR " 



the sight of snuff-brown, yo". deliberately don it 
in defiance! My friend will wait on you at once, 
and I will have the pleasure of slicing you up by 
degrees! " 

The Frenchman wasn't scared, but he was a 
banker and he didn't want to be drawn into a 
duel and have notoriety forced upon him. He 
wouldn't run away, and he didn't want to appeal 
to the law, and he hadn't yet made up his mind 
what course to take when the Austrian threw out 
his hint that $500 and an apology would square 
things. He didn't find an easy man to work. The 
banker decided to pay $200 and no more, and no 
apology went with it. It now became patent that 
the two men were bluffers and blackmailers, but 
the knowledge didn't help us much. We didn't 
want to fight, and we did not want to invoke the 
aid of the law and get before the public as vic- 
tims. The landlord was informed of the character 
of his guests, and he set out to rid the house of 
them, but at his first word the Count wheeled on 
him and roared: 

"So you would insult the best blood of Bavaria 
and Austria, would you! You are a man. You 
must have sword or pistol. Come out among the 
rocks and give me satisfaction!" 

The landlord didn't go. He made an abject apol- 
ogy instead, and on top of the apology he sent 
champagne to the rooms of the bluffers. This in- 
cident occurred in the morning. As soon as lunch 
was over the Count strode up to an American 
name Hill and exclaimed: 

"Ah! you are the man! I saw you scowling at 
me across the dining-room and I marked you. 
The man who scowls at me must fight me." 



stand that 1 am challenged?" 

"You will be a dead man in one hour! I will 
slice you up bit by bit!" 

"Oh! but you won't. I have the choice of wea- 
pons. I choose revolvers, and I'll bet $5000 to a 
cent that I plug your heart with my first bullet. 
In an hour, eh? I'll be on hand. Should your 
friend here suggest a money payment to square 
this thing I'll kick him over the border. Let me 
know when the shooting is to begin." 

Most of us went up the hill to find a proper 
ground, but it was time thrown away. The pair 
had half an hour in which to pack up, settle up 
and get the morning train, and they got it. Scott 
saw them as they made their sneak and he offered 
to fight them with his hands tied behind him — 
with his eyes blindfolded — with razors or butcher 
knives or ice picks, but they gathered up their 
harvest and were ready to depart. The Count 
wouldn't even turn red in the face and bristle his 
moustache as the epithet coward was hurled at 
him. 

(Copyrighted, 1900, Wm. R. Miller.) 

J* :* :* 

A herculean locksmith, who was out of work, 
obtained temporary employment as a laborer on 
one of our large railways. He was set to work 
with an "old hand" to shovel cinder into a wagon. 
When the foreman went to see how they were 
progressing he observed that the "old hand" was 
shoveling twice to the big locksmith's once, and 
he remarked to the latter: "Lock here, my man, 
Jack is throwing two shovels into the wagon to 
your one." "Well, master," replied the locksmith, 
"I've told the fool about it." 



Samuga the Samoarv 

By H. C. Jorves 

ISABELLE DELANOR at 21 had never had a 
lover in the accepted meaning of the term. 
Certain young naval officers who had come 
ashore while their ship was coaling had raved over 
her charms, and one, Ensign Ralph Thurston, had 
sworn to his mates that he would one day return 
to Tutulla and seek to win her as his wife. 

There were only three white persons living on 
the fair Samoan island of Tutuila, in the principal 
harbor of which Pago- Pago, the United States gov- 
ernment maintains its most important coaling sta- 
tion in the South Pacific. They were Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Delanor and their daughter Isabelle. 

Under the influence of the tropical climate Isa- 
belle developed early into a remarkable beautiful 
woman. She was about medium height, with a 
figure the proportions of which were absolute per- 
fection. Her light-brown hair was slightly wavy 
and her blue eyes had the faint greenish tint that 
is so characteristic of California women. 

But there was one man on the island who loved 
Isabelle better than life. Samuga, the son of Ta- 
sito, the ruling chief of Tutuila, worshiped her as 
he might have worshiped a divinity. 

He was a magnificent specimen of the Samoan 
race — tall, straight as an arrow and possessed of 
the strength of a giant. His features were regu- 
lar and handsome and while his skin was dark 
it was as smooth and pure as satin. Under Mr. 
Delanor's teaching Samuga had learned to speak 
English fluently and to read and write. Samuga 
had been the constant companion of Isabelle for 
years, but he had never even whispered a word of 
love. 

One day a schooner from Apia rounded the point 
of Gapu-Gapu and came to anchor off the inner 
reef. Ralph Thurston sat in the sheets of the 
small boat that put off from her side and headed 
for the shore. He was cordially welcomed by Mr. 
Delanor and of course accepted the invitation to 
occupy quarters in the Delanor house — a succession 
of strongly made thatched huts. 

At first glance Thurston seemed to be an exceed- 
ingly good-looking young man; but there was a 
weakness about the mouth and chin and a certain 
shiftiness about the eyes that inspired distrust. 

Samuga conceived an intense dislike for Thurs- 
ton at their first meeting, and there seemed to be 
an instantaneous mutual antipathy between the 
young men. The ensign added to this unfortu- 
nate feeling by a rough attempt to "guy" the na- 
tive, whereupon Samuga became sullen and mo- 
rose. 

Thurston lost no time in laying siege to Isa- 
belle's affections. The girl was gratified by his 
attentions at first, but she seemed to have an in- 
stinctive prompting that he was insincere and un- 
trustworthy. She had little knowledge of men oth- 
er than she had gleaned from the books her fath- 
er had chosen for, but she had an exceedingly well 
balanced mind and the heart of a true woman. 

One moonlight night when Ralph and Isabelle 
were strolling along the beach, Mr. Delanor told 
his wife that Thurston had that day asked for the 
hand of their daughter in marriage. 

"What answer did you give him?" asked Mrs. 
Delanor. 

"I told him, in the first place, that he had known 
Isabelle too short a time to be certain of his love 
for her or her's for him, even if she loved him at 
all; that the girl should in any event decide for 
herself, and that, finally, the man she chose for a 
husband must be satisfied to live on the island as 
long as I lived. Any other climate, as you know, 
would surely kill me and I could not bear to have 
Isabelle go away." 

"By the way," asked Mrs. Delanor. "have you 
noticed how peculiarly Samuga has acted since Mr. 
Thurston came?" 

"I have, indeed, and it has worried me greatly," 
Mr. Delanor replied. "Samuga is a noble fellow 
and as brave a man as ever lived. If only he 
were not a native I would rejoice at the prospect 
of having him a protector for Isabelle. I am sat- 
isfied that he worships her and he is fiercely jeal- 
ous of young Thurston?" 

Down by the moonlit sea Ralph was at the same 
moment telling Isabelle of his love as they sat in 
a kind of natural bower of wide-dVooping gi- 
gantic ferns. He was an eloquent pleader and 
with all the fervor be could command he Implored 
the girl to become his wife and go with him into 
the world— the splendors of which ho described 
much as Claude described to Pauline the glories of 
his palatial home. Isabelle was visibly impressed, 
but she wavered not a moment. 

"I am sure I do not love you," she said, "and I 
will never go away and leave my father and moth- 
er broken-hearted and lonely. I would like to see 
the world you speak of, but I have been happy 
here, and here I will stay." 

Thurston did not abandon hope, but decided to 
carry his point at all hazards. 

Ori the morning following Ralph's proposal he 
and Isabelle went down to the beach to swim. Sa- 
muga watched them from behind a screen of ferns. 
The swimmers were a considerable distance from 
the beach when the Samoan noticed suddenly a 

Continued on rage 7 



4 



Western Graphic 



I MARINE OIL COMPANY 1 



S. W. KNAPP, 

President and lien. Mgr. 



OF SUMMERLAND 

Capital $300,000.00 
140,000 In Treasury 



H. D. LOMBARD 

Secretary and Treas. 



Offers subject to previous sale 10,000 shares at 35 cents per share OH which price we 
are earning' larj^e returns. 25,000 shares sold between May 17th 
and May 30th. After the present issue of 10,000 shares has been 
taken the price will be advanced. 

We Own 32 Producing Wells and Territory for 60 More 

We are not hunting for oil, but we have oil in sufficient quantities 
to earn larye returns on the present selling price of stock 



. m Call or send 

Si for Prospectus 



Marine Oil Company... 



432 Bvrne Building i'/J 
Los Angeles 'ijt. 



OFFICERS 

LOUIS SHI V ELY. President 
JOHN O. MILLER, Vice-l'resideiit, Bakersfield 
E S. TUTT, General Manager 
A . SB IV! l V 



rtND DIRECTORS 

I. E. TUTT, Secretary and Treasurer 
TELEPHONE GENERAL JOHNSTONE JONES, Attorney 

JOHN T. C. MILLER, Hakersfield 

1601 



Sunset Diamond Oil Company 



Par value of Stock *l.oo 3 
Present Price 25 cts -. : : <h 



INCORPORATED UNDER THE LAW'S OF ARIZONA 
Will begin drilling their lirst well on section IS within 500 .vitrei* of Jew) tt'At 

lU.nl^.-ifs f:n s Binlirr, well 17 in the Sunset District. A valuable lease has 

been secured ou 40 acres in the immediate vicinity ol Jewett & Bloiip;elt's refinery and 
the terminus of the new Sunset Railroad. This insures cheap and easy transportation. 



Make remittance payable to the Secretary. 



Office, 426 Byrne Building 



" "Utile Money Worts Wonders" 




The "SUNSET KING" offers to all classes of investors 
the greatest fortune-making prospects of the past fifty years. 
Its location, small capitalization, and brilliant leadership 
recommend it to the most conservative investors. 

SUNSEJ KING OIL GO. 



* Sunset Jfing Oil Co. v - 



320-322 Lauohlin Building % 




F. H. Dunham, Pres. Fkanklin Refining Co., President 

F. L. Hossack, Secretary. 

Hercules Oil Producing Company 

Have begun work on their Kern river laud ; are also drilling 
in Los Angeles field. This Company will build a modern Oil 
Refinery. Plans are now being drawn and a suitable site is 
being negotiated for ; this plant will pay good dividends on 
our entire capitalization. The Company also owns 240 acres in 
the Coalinga oil fields, So acres in Newhall and 120 acres in 
Ventura. $1.00 shares now selling for 25c each ; next advance 
will be to 50c. Send for our pamphlet "Only Oil." 

Rooms 2,50 231 Douglas Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 




I 

Imperial State Mining: and Milling Co.'s 

OFFICERS 

B. Frank Hand President 

S. M. KELSEY Vice-President 

O. S. Williams Secretary 

C. H. S.CHIRMER Treasurer 

U. S. G. Todd General Manager 

S. M. KELSEY Superintendent 

B. Frank Hand . .Consulting Engineer 



fin Absolutely 
Sale Investment 

A Mine, not a ProsDect 

The property consists of the Lost 
Horse, Lost Horse Extension, and 
People's Party Claims, each claim 
being 600 by 1500 feet in area, situated 
in Riverside County, Cal. 

The books of the mine show that 
about 3000 tons have been mined, and 
milled, with an average result of $27 
per ton. 

SHares now 25 Gents 

10-Stamp Mill 

Imperial State Mining and Milling Go. 

Capital $1,000,000 -fully paid— non-assessable 

605 Laughlin Building, .... Los Angeles 



Literary Gossip 

Conducted by^^^Garner Curra.n 

r | ~ HE sympathy which is so freely bestowed 
I upon Tolstoi because of his excommunica- 
tion by the Greek church is just so much 
wasted emotion, says the San Francisco Town 
Talk. The passages in his recent novel, "Resur- 
rection." which called forth the sentence of the 
church are open blasphemy, and the Metropolitan 
of the Orthodox Russian church could pursue no 
other course. The service which the mountebank 
reformer has made the subject of his satirical rid- 
icule is the essential part of the ritual of the 
Greek Catholic church, the State church of the 
Russian empire, of which Tolstoi is in all proba- 
bility a member, at least nominally. Without go- 
ing into the question of religion, it is quite suf- 
ficient to note that the impious slur of the "benev- 
olent and philanthropic novelist" is an insult to 
several million of his fellow-men. Moreover, 
Church and State are closely united in Russia, so 
that any interference with one naturally affects 
the other. Tolstoi, who has evidently modified his 
religious views since he wrote "War and Peace," 
is simply "playing for the gallery." The "nine 
days' wonder" over his sham peasant pose has 
ceased. Now he will try the martyrdom for relig- 
ion role. 

(5^ 

Stanley Waterloo's last book, "The Seekers," 
which H. S. Stone & Co., of Chicago, will publish 
shortly, is said to deal with some phases of the 
Christian Science movement. 

tj( 

Are we not — who are classed under the generic 
head of "the reading public" — growing just a trifle 
weary of the historical novel? It is quite evident 
that the men and women who supply the market 
with these more or less interesting tales of other 
days are heartily in favor of this style of literary 
architecture. It is far more easy. to build on a 
firm foundation laid by other hands than it is to 
dig and delve and lay your own foundation before 
you begin the pleasanter work of constructing the 
graceful edifice that your fancy has planned for 
yon; hence the temptation— irresistible to so many 
— to turn to history instead of living humanity for 
subjects and character for the novel of the day. 

All this, however, has little, if any reference to 
Robert Neilson Stephen's latest book, "Philip 
Winwood," for though by strict segregation it 
would be classed among those just spoken of. the 
history therein is so subservient to the story, 
which itself is full of interest and action, that 
the reader really minds it very little. The scene is 
laid in New York and London between the years 
17G3 and 1786, but only glimpses of the turmoil of 
those troublous times are given us, as the real in- 
terest centers around the fortunes of one family, 
divided against itself by political differences, but 
finding peace and happiness in the after days that 
brought the same blessings to the infant republic. 

Naming a novel is not an easy thing to do — and 
do well. Dickens roamed all over London taking 
notes of names on signboards and in windows, 
and Balzac was never satisfied until the title of 
his book was suggested by a reality. Mary John- 
ston found in the Book of Common Prayer a name 
for her last and highly successful romance. "To 
Have and to Hold" is taken from the marriage 
service and is certainly felicitous. The name of 
her first novel, "Prisoners of Hope," originated in 
the death-cry of one of her Puritan characters, 
who shouted as he fell the words of Zachariah, 
"Turn ye. turn ye to the Stronghold, ye Prisoners 
of Hope." 



To the Deaf 

A . teh lady, cured of her deafness and noises in 
the head by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drums, 
gave $100,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people 
unable to procure the Ear Drums, may have them 
free. Address No. 532c, The Nicholson Institute, 
780 Eighth Avenue, New York. 5-7-01 



A Missouri editor propounds the following ques- 
tion: "A boy 10 years old has a sister who weighs 
25 pounds and he gets tired of holding her 5 min- 
utes. When he is twice as old how long will it 
take him to get tired holding some one's else sis- 
ter who weighs 125?" 

C. W. SMITH. President H. O. HAINES, Treasurer 

F. C. ME I. TON, Secretary 

m\\ew <?eptury Oil <?o. 

Has a total of :i»t',M acres of the choicest Oil Lands, situated 
in the very heart of the known and proven best producing 
districts. This Company will also manufacture, under U. is. 
patent 439,745, 

Gasoline, Kerosene, Sewing Machine Oil, 
Bicycle 011, Engine Oil, Cylinder 011 
and Asphaltum 

Samples of all these can be seen at the Company's office. 
Subscriptions for stock will be received from 10 a m. to 5pm 
SHARES * IO. OO E«CH 

NEW CENTURY OIL COMPANY 

Telephone GREEN 564 108-109-1 10 StimSOn Blk. 



* Northern f 
| Consolidated f 
Oil Company f 



No. 2. 



THIS is the last of the Charles Vic- 
tor Hall dividend-producing oil 
companies which will be placed 
upon the market. Its capital is larger 
than either of the preceding companies, 
and is divided into shares of the par 
value of $1 each which is offered to the 
public. 



10 Cts. per Share 

FULLY PAID UP 



The producing wells belonging to 
this company have a monthly produc- 
tion of about 10,000 barrels. This pro- 
duction is expected to produce a reve- 
nue sufficient to pay a dividend of 2Vz 
per cent per month, payable upon the 
18th of each month, on the saleable 
price (10 cents) of the stock. A new 
well has been started in the Nob Hill 
district, Los Angeles. 

It has extensive oil territory in the 
Fullerton district and other portions of 
Orange county, in Los Angeles county, 
7000 acres in the Simi ranch, and large 
areas of territory in Ventura and San- 
ta Barbara counties, 500 acres of 
which is adjacent to where oil has 
been struck, and on this land it is 
known that there are millions of bar- 
rels of asphaltum, all of which has a 
high commercial value. The price of 
this stock is only 



10 Cts. per Share 

FULLY PAID UP 



The management believe that the 
stock of this company will go to 20 
cents per share as soon as the issue 
is sold. The dividends which it will 
pay and the value of the land it owns 
or controls are such that as soon as 
development work begins and the pub- 
lic has an opportunity to fully appre- 
ciate the solid basis upon which the 
company is founded will make this 
one of the most popular and valuable 
stocks on the market. 

When desired, upon the payment of 
25 per cent of the selling price of the 
stocks, money will be loaned upon the 
shares, atl per cent per month, payable 
in one, two and three months, taking 
stock certificate as security, the pur- 
chaser receiving the dividends from 
date of sale. Also, purchasers of stock 
can return the same within 30 days 
and receive the money if they so de- 
sire. 

Stock now on sale. 



Address 

\ Charles V. Hall 

, 248 Wilcox Block 

Telephone James 2971 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



t 

i 

I 



Western Graphic 





Under the D 



e r r i c 



IS was suggested in these columns some time 
ago, those who begin development work on 
placer claims are liable to get into legal 
trouble. Already several suits have been com- 
menced which involve the title of such land, and 
the number of these suits is rapidly increasing. 
These placer claims are not, however, the only 
danger which beset the oil men in regard to titles. 
The title to leased land is being attacked in vari- 
ous ways. In a suit against Dr. Bok and others 
of Los Angeles, a claim is set up that the lease 
was obtained by fraud is therefore void. The 
special fraud claimed in this case was that the 
non resident owner was not informed that it was 
oil land and instead of being a lease for oil pur- 
poses it was a rental which did not convey the 
right of boring for oil. In another instance a 
prior lease intervened. Such instances should 
teach oil men to be careful in taking leases, and 
always record them, and in order to entitle them 
to record they should be acknowledged by the 
grantors. Unless more care is taken in drawing 
and executing leases a large crop of such law- 
suits will grow up in the near future. It is best 
to pay the lawyers a moderate fee to have the 
papers tightly drawn, and thus avoid the neces- 
sity of incurring the expenses of litigation later 
on. 

The excitement now prevailing in many locali- 
ties on the mesas between the mountains and the 
ocean in reference to oil will probably result in a 
great deal of money being lost in a vain search 
for oil where there are no surface indications but 
reliance is put in the presence of oil in wells. This 
search may result in the finding of a new oil dis- 
trict, but the failure which has attended such 
pioneering near Los Angeles does not give much 
encouragement of success. Oil is most probably 
underlying a portion of such lands, but its extent 
is one of the problems which will require large sums 
of money to solve, for in the porous soil of such 
sections, oil may be so generally distributed that 
traces of it can be found long distances from the 
source of supply. And the difficulty in localities 
where the soil has so deeply covered up all traces 
of oil sand and shale is that the quest is one in 
which it is a game of hit or miss with no com- 
pass to guide the drill. 

Although San Francisco has made a flat failure 
in trying to be the big fish in oil development 
many of her capitalists are making heavy invest- 
ments in dividend-producing oil companies. The 
Spreckels, Crockers and many other careful bus- 
iness men are quietly buying into oil, and in some 
instances are doing considerable pioneering. The 
San Francisco papers are quite restive under the 
fact that oil men will pass their city by and come 
here to make their investments. To the most 
casual observer the reason is plain. In the first 
place, the oil territory is here, and then it is nec- 
essary to come to Los Angeles to study the ques- 
tion and learn the practical side of the business. 
Oil men have good common sense and don't go 
where there is so little knowledge of the oil in- 
dustry as San Francisco exhibits to get reliable 
Information on the subject. 

& :< :< 

When the new branch of the Southern Pacific 
from Bakersfleld to the Kern river oil fields is 
completed a very large amount of oil will be 
brought into the market at that point. After this 
event the producing capacity of the wells of that 
field will be tested, and people will know whether 
the estimates made are reliable or not. The claim 
is made that the average per well is considerably 
over twenty barrels per day. It' Ibis lie so it is 
a most remarkable field. 

.* 

The Sunset district, is getting a reputation for 
reporting fake oil strikes. Undoubtedly the truth 
about the production of that field is good enough, 
and for this reason these wild stories will have 
a bad effed upon the district. It has many good 
wells, some of which are producing wonderfully, 
and it is not necessary nor good policy for every 
company drilling within a dozen miles of the field 
to claim a gusher even before they have the der- 
rick up. 

A press representative lately arrived in an oil 
town and straightway announced in a local paper 
that oil men who wished to go over the territory 
with him should address, etc. This is a neat way 



of avoiding livery bills, and it might produce rev- 
enue in other ways. 

Jt .4 ,<* 

Mrs. Tingley, the head of the Tlieosophists. or 
Universal Brotherhood, who lias her headquarters 
at Point Loma, near San Diego, has gone into the 
oil business, having located a placer claim in that 
vicinity. Perhaps she is on a hunt for one of her 
astral bodies that got stuck in the mud of the 
piocenian period when the oil was being distilled 
out of sea grass and big fishes. 

■ -* < ■< 

In riding on the cars from Carpenteria to Ven- 
tura the ap< \ of a distinct anticlinal can be traced 
from the car windows, in the ocean for a distance 
of several miles. Further up this is several miles 
from the shore, but its presence can he traced by 
the oil discolored water. 



Howard I). Silent 



Ed. D. Silent & Co. 1 

I 



• Horace S. Otter 
vl/ 

* 

Vjj ESTABLISHED IN 18S5 

$ KEMBBBB 

I LOS ANGELES OIL EXCHANGE 

* CALIFORNIA OIL EXCHANGE 

\l/ BUY AMI SK 1.1. \i/ 

I Oil Stocks Strictly on Commission | 

V OFFICE * 

X 216 West Second street Tel Main 695 $ 



The only way to purchase Oil Stocks 
is through some disinterested 
Capable Broker ~ 

\A/F Deal in Oil Stocks Exclusively 
™ I— Are thoroughly posted .... 

Dickinson & Bush 



OIL STOCK BROKERS ) 

Wilcox Building ^ 



L. M. (JltKCOItY 



Telephone Green 

1878 



J, M. II KRNDON 



GREGORY & HERNDON 

Brokers and Dealeca on California Exchanges in 

Oil, Stocks, Bonds, Collaterals, 
Leases, Loans and Lands 
1 33 SOUTH BROADWAY LOS ANGELES 

■s> it/ m \ii\ti iti mnan \i; it/ it/ it it/ mm m * ^ ^ it, ,</ .1, ,1. ,1, .1, it, . 1, ,1, ,imi. >», 

I Kern River Oil 

and Development Co. 



20i Laughlin Bldg. 212 Sansome St. 

Los Angeles San Francisco 

Own outright ^20 acres in Kern District. 

Lease outright on 100 acres in Iuillerton Dis- 
trict, near big producing wells. 

250,000 shares, Ji.cxi each 100,000 shares in 
treasury. Non-assessable. 

20 Cents a Share 



•VI > '•> 'I "I "I 1 "• " • "' > 1 "' 1 'I "I "I "I > 'I' 'I "I "I > '< ' 'i "I "li 'li 'I » '»> 1 1 '(i 'ti <f 

The Pacific Coast Regalia Co. 

f\. T E IN IN £1 INT (IK /1Y 

Mann of*!!?" Military and Society Goods 



Flags, Manners, Badges, 
(l|;lfnrins mid Sworrls 
Hold anil Sliver Trimming! 
Bullion Kmbroldcric 



. . MO.. 

WEST SECOND STRE E 



NOTICE 

DThe I/OH Angeles City Water Company will strictly enforce 
the following rule: The hours for sprinklng are between 6 and 
8 o'clock a. m. and 0 and H o'clock p m. Kor a violation of the 
above regulations the water will be shut, oft, and a fine of 12.00 
will be charged before the water will be turned on again. 



6 



Western Graphic 



The advance in the price of oil which has taken 
place during the past week results from the rapid 
present and prospective increase in consumption 
consequent upon the investigations which have 
been made by manufacturers in reference to its 
utility as fuel. Every day inquiries are being 
made of oil producers in regard to their ability 
to contract for the future delivery of oil. and this 
inquiry has resulted in the discovery of the fact 
that large producers generally have their oil con- 
tracted for future delivery. The announcement 
of the Santa Fe railroad that the company will 
soon have all their engines in California equipped 
for burning oil, provides for the use by that 
company of over 45,000 barrels more than it is 
now using. The Southern Pacific is also rapidly 
increasing its use of oil, manufacturers are trying 
to make large contracts on long time, and in every 
department of business where fuel is used the 
desire to discard the more costly use of coal is 
becoming universal. The next six months will un- 
doubtedly be largely increased from the opening 



SANTA MONICA RE SORT S 

F)otel Hrcadia 

Santa )VIomca 
by the sea 

finest Summer Resort on the pacific 

Elegant Hotel Elevator 
Electric Lights Orchestra 

SERVICE, TABLE, AND APPOINTMENTS 
UNEXCELLED 

Delightful, cool breezes from the ocean on 

warmest days. 
An ideal Summer Resort for those who wish 

to escape the heat of interior towns. 
The cleanest, smoothest and safest beach in the 
world. 

Surf bathing, boating, fishing, beautiful drives. 
Reached by S. P. R. R. trains and electric cars 
every half hour. Time from Los Angeles 
55 minutes. 
For rates and further information address 

W. E. ZANDER, Mgr. 



Ocean park^ /* 

Domes By the Sea ^"t* of M - 

' Santa JYIomca 

Ocean front, Klegaut bench. Water pipeil to tract, Electric llgh 
connection Long lease, S10.00 to SJ5.00 yearly rental. The 
best opportunity ever offered to secure a home on the beach 

Ocean Hir Ocean Beach 
Ocean Bathing 

Call on or address 

T. H . DUDLEY 

Corner Hill anil Beach Streets 
Ocean Park 

iCfer^^^ ! X^^ ) <^^^)cQ^^^ ) fi 

Santa Monica 

will be more attractive this summer than 
before. There are No Saloons a New Club 
House for golf and tennis, a salt water 
Plunge filled daily and kept warm and 
many other things which ought to make it 
the best summer resort this coming season. 
Address a letter to the North Beach Bath 
House Co. and we shall be glad to furnish 
you with all sorts of information about hotel 
rates, cottages, bathing, athletics or any. 
thing else you many desire to know. Let 
us help you locate this year. 



DAVIS M. CLARK 

REAL ESTATE, RENTAL AGENT 
I have a fine list of Cottages and Building Lots for sale 
or rent. The finest Beach on the Coast. 

jioj S. Second St., Oceanpark, 
At terminus of electric car line L. A. Co., Cal. 



LADIFS 

Hiive your Freckles Removed 

B » 1 s " e Original Freckle Salve 

PREPARED ONLY BY 

O. F". HEIINZE/V\AN 

222 North C HUM 1ST 



MhIii Street 



Price 50 cts. 



of new wells and the increase of transportation 
to fields where the output cannot be moved on 
account of the expense of shipping. But however 
large this may be, the demand will keep ahead of 
the supply. With the question of a market out of 
the way.the work of development can go forward 
with renewed energy. 

«5» J» 

Statements have often been made that the pres- 
ence of paraffine has been found in California 
petroleum, but these have usually been regarded 
as unreliable, and until lately no reliable data has 
been at hand in confirmation of the claim that 
paraffine has been found in our oils. But the 
claim is now made that a reputable chemist has 
discovered paraffine in the oils of the Big Panoche 
district. The analysis above referred to was as 
follows: 

Gravity, .8592—33 B.; viscosity, 3.02, very good; 
asphalt by distillation, 4.12 per cent.; asphalt by 
precipitation, 4.0 per cent.; benzine and lighter, 
about 20 per cent.; illuininants, about 25 per cent.; 
lubricants and paraffine, about 45 per cent.; as- 
phalt, about 5 per cent.; loss, about 5 per cent. 
Paraffine crystallized from about 50 per cent, of 
distillate. 

The writer has been shown an analysis of oil 
shale from a district east of Los Angeles in which 
S per cent, of paraffine was shown. These numer- 



points consequent upon the fierce speculation 
which characterized the early portion of the pres- 
ent year. General business, including the great 
body of commercial houses, have been exempt 
from these speculative disasters. The assets af 
failing traders have aggregated 25 per cent above 
those of last year, which shows that a large per 
cent went to the wall for lack of ready cash and 
not because of any disastrous shrinkage of values. 
J* Jl J» 

The postoffice is a pretty good index of general 
business. The past year shows that the deficit of 
receipts over income is $5,489,246, being $130,530 
less than in 1899, while the expenditures were 
$5,189,246 more. When it is remembered that the 
demands upon the postal funds for the enlarge- 
ment of the service have been very heavy, the 
result is very satisfactory. 

.4 ■* 

While the oil excitement has largely increased 
certain lines of business, affecting all those which 
deal in iron and machinery, and also enlarged the 
earning capacity of the laboring classes, it has 
not so favorably affected general business, — in 
some lines it is had a depressing effect. This 
arises from the large amounts of money all classes 
of people are putting into oil stocks. People are 
economizing in their expenses in order to get 
money to buy oil stocks and thus withdrawing 




oil. WKI.LS .\T .-I MMKItl.ANIi-l.OOKI.Nii KROM T1IK WIlAKK 



ous instances of the presence of paraffine in Cali- 
fornia oil may eventually result in a reversal of 
the commonly entertained belief that only fuel and 
lubricating oil are found here. The extremely vol- 
atile oils of the Coalinga, Fullerton and other 
fields would indicate the presence of kerosene to 
a large- extent, and it would not be surprising that 
they in other respects carry the characteristics of 
Eastern oils. 



Money and Tracde 

THE closing days of the fiscal year has 
brought with it the usual treasury state- 
ments, which enables people to cast up the 
results of business for the past six months. Some 
pointers in this direction are disproving many re- 
ports which have been rife as to the condition of 
business for some months past. 

One of these is in regard to the alleged increase 
in failures. Bradstreet's says that the number of 
failures during the past six months has been the 
smallest of any noted for the past 18 years. Com- 
pared with that of a year ago, the decrease was 
3.3 per cent, and is 25 per cent over 1898. The 
volume of liabilities is 19 per cent larger than a 
year ago, but this was occasioned by several very 
large concerns in New York and other eastern 



large amounts from general trade. This accounts 
for the dullness complained of for a few weeks by 
merchants. But this is only for the time being. 
The craze for such stocks will not continue in 
such volume much longer, and soon this money 
will be returned to the channels of trade by a large 
increase in the number of men employed in new 
oil development, where most of the money re- 
ceived for the stocks will ultimately go. Speaking 
broadly, the money coming into the country from 
oil has held business up wonderfully well when 
the effects of the drouth upon agricultural opera- 
tions is considered. The country is passing through 
the summer in better shape than last year de- 
spite the lack of rains. 

«a» jt J* 

The effect of the high prices to which iron and 
steel were advanced was the cause of the falling 
off in the demand which has been experienced for 
some weeks past. The price had passed beyond 
the point the business of the country could stand, 
and the inevitable result ensued. Many other 
lines of business are similarly affected. Manufac- 
turers have discovered that even trusts are not all- 
powerful, and when prices are raised beyond the 
point where people will buy, the reaction will sure- 
ly cause the demand to fall off. The iron men have 
learned this business axiom, and the paper, sugar, 
coal, and many others are beginning to realize 
that trade can only be fostered by moderate prices. 



Where Cool Breezes Blow 



REDONDO— The ancient custom of going out 
of town to avoid the explosive patriotism 
of young America, brought nothing but dis- 
appointment to those whose desire for rest took 
them to Redondo. Here everything was life, noisy, 
good natured, "throw-a-cracker-at-the-old-gent" 
sort of noise. If one went to the beach his quiet 
was disturbed by an enthusiastic throng of cele- 
brators; it he went to the hotel he was over- 
whelmed by the spirit of gaiety that pervaded 
this otherwise eminently respectable retreat; if he 
sought refuge on the golf links life was made mis- 
erable by the incessant call of "fore." One's dis- 
appointment, however, in his failure to find quiet 
was offset by the enjoyment of a pleasant day, 
with pleasant people, at a pleasant place. The fu- 
ture holds in store for those at the beach a num- 
ber of pleasing diversions. An open handicap ten- 
nis tournament has been announceu by the Re- 
dondo Beach Country Club for next Friday and 
Saturday, July 13th and 14th. The club has pro- 
vided handsome championship cups as tournament 



trophies, besides gold and silver medals for the 
winners of first and second places in the different 
events. Among those who have entered are sev- 
eral of the leading players of Southern Califor- 
nia. Much interest has been manifested in tennis 
circles, and it is expected that the coming tourna- 
ment will be one of the most successful ever held 
by the club. On the Saturuay evening following 
the tennis meet a dance will be given at Hotel 
Redondo complimentary to the players and their 
friends. These parties are always attended by the 
society young folks of Los Angeles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Clark and the Misses Clark 
arrived at the hotel Thursday and will remain for 
a number of weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Francis will be located 
at the hotel for a portion of the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. McFarland have taken possession 
of their cottage for the month of July. Miss 
Louise McFarland has as her guests Miss Eliza 
Bonsall and Miss Florence Silent. 

Mrs. Ozro W. Childs and Mrs. John E. Plater 



Western Graphic 



spent the day 'i uesday with friends at the hotel. 

Mrs. J. H. Bohon entertained Mrs. Clifford Page, 
Mrs. Willoughby Rodman, Mrs. Albert Crutcher 
and Miss Crutcner of Kentucky last Thursday. 

Miss Waddilove was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
W. E. Dunn for the Fourth. 

J* J* & 

SANTA MONICA— The summer golf season 
was opened on the Fourth with a big tour- 
nament on the links of the Santa Monica 
Golf Club. The new Casino clubhouse was nicely 
decorated and a light luncheon was served under 
its roof. 

After the tournament about thirty of the golf- 
ers repaired to the Arcadia for dinner, which was 
followed by an informal hop. Those who mane up 
the dinner party were: Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Jones, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Stimson, Mr. and Mrs. E. T. 
Stimson, Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Fleming, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. G. Bundrum, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Holiday, Mr. 
and Mrs. F. A. Griffith, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Nor- 
ton, Mrs. W. A. Barker, Mrs. R. B. Clark of Peoria, 
111., Mr. H. H. Henderson, Mr. C. A. Henderson. 

t£ 

Some of the names on the Arcadia register are: 
Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Howbert, Cripple Creek, Colo.; 
Mr .and Mrs. E. B. Tufts; Dr. F. R. Cunningham; 
Mrs. and Miss Fisher, San Francisco; Nathan W. 
Blanchard; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Doty, Chicago; 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Norton; Mrs. George Mont- 
gomery; Mrs. S. Kronberg, New York; Mr. and 
Mrs. B. A. Miller; Mr. L. P. Schaffer, Redlands; 
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Hellman and family; Mrs. 
Howard Jones, Philadelphia; Mrs. W. J. Harris 
and Miss Harris; Mr. Chester W. Ames, Salt Lake; 
Mrs. Abe Meertilf, San Francisco. 

\ % 

^ A VALON. — When it comes to a celebration 
/-\ or display of any kind, Avalon never 
takes a back seat, and each event is made 
to surpass those preceding. Never in its history 
has there been such a display of fireworks or so 
many attractions presented for the entertainment 
of the visitors within her gates, as in the celebra- 
tion of our nation's birthday. On the evening of 
the 3rd the festivities began with a water carni- 
val. All the lauches in the bay were decorated 
and passed in review before the judges, for the 
prizes offered for the best decorated boat, and then 
a parade of water craft began. Only the lights 
outlining the boats were visible and as circles and 
serpentine figures and letter 8's were formed, the 
scene was truly enchanting, backed as it was by 
thousands of lights strung on wires across the 
streets and from every building in the little town. 
On the arrival of the steamer crowded with ex- 
cursionists the hills about the town burst out in 
flames, along the shore was a line of fire and from 
the decks of the steamer answering gleams of red 
and white flames came back outlining the boat 
as perfectly as though it were midday. Then the 
rockets and Roman candles and other forms of 
fireworks added their quota of noise and glare 
till in the excitement one could not be certain if 
he were still on terra flrma or had been trans- 
ported to fairy land. The occasion was one to be 
long remembered, and the incoming passengers on 
the Hermosa declared that never before in all their 
lives had they witnessed such a wonderful scene of 
beauty. 

The barbecue which had been heralded as one 
of the attractions of the celebration occurred at 
noon on the 4th. Four beeves, twelve sheep, more 
than half a ton of fish and three barrels of beans 
were prepared, and a royal feast was held. Some 
fifteen hundred or two thousand persons partook 
of the repast, but when all were filled to repletion 
there yet remained enough to feed a small regi- 
ment. It was a grand success. 

An aquatic tug-of-war in boats was the most 
exciting event of. the celebration and for nearly 
an hour the crowd stood on the beach fairly hold- 
ing their breaths with interest in seeing ten skilled 
oarsmen in teams of five, each man in a separate 
boat, pulling as if his life and that of all his 
friends depended upon him. First one team and 
then the other would gain an advantage and the 
crowds shouted themselves hoarse in cheering 
their favorite team. 

There was also a baseball game, the Catalina 
team crossing bats with the Wilmington nine. The 
score was six to two in favor of the Catalina boys. 

Then there were foot races and a regatta in 
which the launches were gaily decked out with 
bunting, and other features, which made the day 
one to be long remembered. 

-3 S- 

| 323 Acres in Soquel Canyon | 



No Salaries ? 
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Terininal Island was thronged with visitors on 
the Fourth, every incoming train on the Los An- 
geles Terminal Railway being packed with a strug- 
gling mass of humanity. The capacity of the Gor- 
don Arms, the leading hotel of the island, and 
of all the other places where refreshments could 
be secured were taxed to the utmost limit. A jolly 
party of young society people from Los Angeles 
came down to the Gordon Arms on the evening 
of the 3rd, and the popular house was made the 
scene of dancing and festivity until the wee small 
hours. An advantage which this beach affords, 
and which cannot be said of all its rivals for pop- 
ular favor, is that the entire stretch of it from 
Long Beach to the end of Terminal Island admits 
of building cottages close to the water's edge. 
From the front porches of the Gordon Arms one 
can gaze out directly over a magnificent expanse 
of ocean, dotted here and there with the sail of 
the ocean steamer, or the spry little yacht, which 
on gala days, like the Fourth or a warm Sunday, 
carries its load of pleasure seekers to and from 
the various beaches at Terminal and Long Beach. 
Indeed, we of Southern California scarcely appre- 
ciate the advantages we have in the shape of 
convenient summer outings. Where is there an- 
other locality in many miles that one can in fifty 
minutes' time leave a city of 100,000 population, 
teeming with its life and bustle, and be transport- 
ed to any one of half a dozen cool seaside re- 
sorts. The ride to Terminal Island on the Terminal 
railroad, after leaving Alamitos Beach, is one 
continual view for miles of the ocean front, 
and a grand and inspiring spectacle it is indeed. 
No wonder that such throngs enjoy riding on the 
Terminal trains to these popular beaches through- 
out the entire summer season . 



Continued from page f 

great commotion on board Thurston's schooner, 
which was still lying at anchor in the harbor. Ho 
could see men trying to lower a boat and could 
hear them shouting. 

Following the evident direction of their glances 
the keen eyes of the native detected the cause of 
the tumult. Even at that distance he could see the 
dorsal fin of a shark, that man-eating tiger of the 
sea, moving swiftly through the water toward Isa- 
belle. He could also see that Thurston was mak- 
ing frantic efforts to reach the boat that had put 
off from the schooner, and had left Isabelle to her 
fate. There was a chance that the boat might 
reach and save the girl if it did not stop to take 
Ralph in. Thurston was in no immediate danger, 
as the shark was headed for Isabelle. He was 
frantic with terror, however, and when the boat 
reached him he halted it and clambered in over 
the stern sheets. This action meant death to Isa- 
belle, as far as Thurston was concerned. 

But there was another factor in the situation. 
The instant that Samuga discovered the shark he 
ran to the reef, unmoored and leaped into his 
canoe and in a trice the little craft was fairly fly- 
ing over the water, propelled by the strong arms 
of the Samoan. Samuga had seen the cowardly ac- 
tion of Thurston, and the fury of his anger seemed 
to add to his great strength. Isabelle had long 
since discovered her peril, and when she saw Sa- 
muga put out in his canoe she swam to meet him 
with all the speed she could command. 

For a time, that seemed an age, but was really 
only a few minutes, the chances appeared to be 
in favor of the shark reaching the* girl in advance 
of her would-be rescuer, but with mighty strokes 
of his paddle Samuga dre;w rapidly closer and 
closer. 

At the moment when the monster sank beneath 
the surface preparatory to turning over on his 
back to seize his prey, Samuga reached the spot 
and dived into the sea, with his great knife firmly 
grasped in his hand. Isabelle a moment later had 
seized Samuga's canoe, into which she hauled her- 
self. Even before she had drawn herself into the 
little craft the water all around was stained with 
blood. Whether the blood was that of Samuga or 
the shark Isabelle did not know, but the native 
remained below the surface so long that she feared 
the worst. With paddle in hand, however, she 
remained ready to render assistance when the 
brave fellow should come to the surface. 

Presently he appeared in the midst of the bloody 
pool, and he looked ghastly indeed as he swam to 
the canoe. But it was the blood of the shark that 
covered and surrounded him. He had had a ter- 
rific battle with the creature beneath the surface, 
but had won the fight. The carcass soon came up 
and was towed to the beach. 

Thurston renewed his suit that night, but was 
repelled so emphatically that he gave up and Bailed 
the next day for Apia. 

Samuga is now a great chief, and has for his 
wife the most, beautiful woman in all Samoa. Isa- 
belle has raised the Samoan to her level, and the 
tribe of Samuga is regarded as the most enlight- 
ened in the entire archipelago. 




Tennis Tournament 

REDONDO 



^ ^ 



FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

July 13 and 14 

Hop at HOTEL RED0ND0 

Saturday kveninQ 

"Tanned by Ocean Breezes" 



Germinal 
Island 

Cong 
Beach 

Catalina 
Tsland 



No better places for Ska Bathing, Fishing 
Yachting and Boating on the Pacific 
Coast. Fine hotels, good boarding houses, 
Klegant camp grounds and pure water. 
Agents of the 

Los Angeles Terminal Railway 

Will sell you tickets and furnish all desired 
information. 

Excursion Rates Frequent Trains 

City Ticket Office, !„':', 7 So. Spring St., Los Angeles 
F. K . Rule, Gen. Mgr. T. (; Peck, (Jen. Pass Aet. 




'REE CAMP GROUND 

With Pure Mountain Water 
— at Avalon — 

Santa Catalina 



Island 



A Missouri editor propounds the following cpies- 
tion: "A boy 10 years old has a sister who weighs 
25 pounds and he gets tired of holding her 5 min- 
utes. When he is twice as old how long will it 
take him to get tired holding some one's else sis- 
ter who weighs 125?" 



Under conditions prevailing last year. Dozens 
of swift power launches for fishing and ej."ur- 
sions. Tuna Club tournament now on. Free 
concerts by our famous band of 20 soloists. 
The best golf links. The aquarium, containing 
hundreds of living wonders of the deep. Boat- 
ing and bathing over Nature's most wonderful 
inaiine gardens, as seen at great depth through 
smooth transparent waters, with the many 
other natural advantages, permits Catalina to 
oiler attractions for season of 1900 not possible 
at other resorts. Daily steamer service, Her- 
mosa running Saturdays and Sundays. Hotel 
Metropole always open. Take Southern Pa- 
cific or Terminal Ry. trains, leaving L. A. 
daily at 9:05 and 8:50 a. in., respectively. Fare 
round trip from Los Angeles, excursion f 2 50; 
regular $2.75. 

BANNING CO. S£$£*cS 

Telephone Main 36 



I OS ANGELES PACIFIC R.R. 

The Scenic Route 10 
Santa Monica.... 

LKAVK FOURTH 8T M Ix>H Angeled, every thirty rain- 
titen on the hour ami half hour Irom 6. HO a.m. to 7.80 
p.m., 8.80, 0.30, 10.30, 11.30. 

LHAVK HANI) STAND, Hauta Monica, every half 
hour on the quarter and Ihr. e quarter from 5.4"> a.m. to 
7.45 p.m., 8.45, 0.4.'., IVM 



■ -» ~ A A A A .A i. -A. J. J. > - . * 

. 7 -r -r -r v » » » » <r - - - 



Joseph Maier, George Zobelein 

Pres. and Treas. Vlce-Pres. and Sec'y 

HOME INDUSTRY KEEP MONEY AT HOME 

MAIER & ZOBELEIN 




BREWERY 



Incorporated 

444 ALISO STREET % 

: tel. M. 91. Los Angeles, Cal. S> 



A TENT 



o 

TH 



h n e BEACH 



It costs less to occupy a tent 
at Coronado's Tent City than 
to stay at home. You can rent 
them furnished or unfurnished 
You can keep house if you 
like. Grocery store on the 
grounds. Tents with electric 
lights and Coronado water. 
Music at the Pavilion and a 
hop in the evenings. Dancing, 
bathing, fishing, boating — 
every day a pleasure. Only 
$4.00 round trip, good till 
September 30. 

Ask Santa Fe Agent About it 



jHammam Turkish 

Russian or ^ 



\ 

j Los Angeles.... 



210 South Broadway 



Tel. Green 427 



Open Day 
and Night 



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s6 

« 
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• • » « Che Paper in this Publication is 
"fialf tone Book," furnished by « • « • 

Blake, moffitt * Cowne 



« « « « 



Paper Dealers 



« « « « 



« Paper « of • all « Descriptions 



Cos Hnsclcs 



California 



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Eureka 
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Hide by ST1MIAKU OIL 10. 



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Western Graphic 
EXPOSITION GOSSIP 

A Chatty Letter From Pa^ris 

By BEN. C. TRUMAN 



7»HE Exposition is not even yet finished, but 
there is quite enough to see and to enjoy 
and to remember. There are a number of 
side shows and restaurants not yet completed and 
the hammer and the saw may still be heard inter- 
mittently on flooring, on facade and on wall. But 
no one now minds these defects, except in the 
Machinery building, which cannot be in perfect or- 
der before the end of July. Neither is the elec- 
tricity building and its accessories so near readi- 
ness as to warrant the belief that its aims can be 
fully reached before the middle of the same 
month. But no one now says "It is not at all 
ready" or "It won't be ready for a month." No 
one any more finds fault because there is a wilder- 
ness of beautiful things to see and to admire and 
miles upon miles of wonders to explore. On all 
the main grounds and esplanades no debris or 
other obstacle meets the eye; there are some bad 
places and other evidences of a stubborn unpre- 
paredness off the main ways, but all these will 
have been among the things that were in another 
fortnight. 

If I had not long since concluded that the "sa- 
cred story" of the destruction of Sodom and Go- 
morrah by the Almighty on account of the wick- 
edness of their inhabitants was too silly a fiction 
to appeal at all to modern intelligence and ordi- 
nary reasoning faculties I should at once after 
having arrived at Longchamp on the day of the 
Grand Prix thought the Omnipotent had given up 
his job or was letting that awfully good fellow 
the Devil have everything his own way. For there 
were a hundred thousand people breaking nearly 
all of the ten commandments — for they were 
swearing, carousing, bearing false witness, covet- 
ing — and all on a Sunday. From my standpoint 
1 do not believe all these people were wicked. 
Indeed, although there is always more or less 
swearing and gambling and drinking on all race 
tracks, there was the utmost decorum for so tre- 
mendous a crowd, and not an ungentle act nor 
accident occurred, although there were twelve 
thousand carriages and automobiles on the roads 
laeding to the Longchamp race course that mem- 
orable Sunday afternoon. The ways through the 
Bois de Boulogne had all been scrupulously swept 
and sprinkled, and a hundred thousand odd people 
had lined the majestic thoroughfares from the 
Arche de Triomphe to the Longchamp gates to see 
the equipages and their occupants pass. The 
trees were prodigal in leaf and each set in grass of 
emerald green. Flowers on all sides gave out de- 
licious odors and delightful breezes elbowed their 
zephyry ways from softly polaric points. It was 
a matchless crowd of superior looking people — 
that is, the sixteen thousand that paid twenty 
francs each to occupy chairs and settees in the 
top-notch tribunes. Not a man but had a silk 
hat and a Prince Albert coat; and the women, who 
were quite as numerous as the men, all looked as 
if they had been smiled upon by Felix, Doucet, 
Virot and Worth. And such rivers of champagne 
as flowed in the woods behind the track! And 
such clockwork in starting, timing and announc- 
ing! I wish my old friend Tom Mott could have 
been here. He would have said, "I can now die 
happy and at peace with all the world." 

The laws against adulteration in France are ex- 
ceedingly stringent — that is, it is presumed they 
are. They really are ferocious reading. It is 
still against the law to smoke on the common In 
Boston; it is unlawful to swear on the streets in 
San Francisco, and there is an ordinance against 
expectorating along the sidewalks of Los Angeles. 
So far as these laws are concerned one is about 
as readily and conveniently broken in one place 
as in the other. France today imports millions of 
gallons of Italian, Greek and Californian wines 
annually; and after due manipulation, which 
moans adulteration or sophistication, they are 
barreled or bottled and sold as Medoc, Bordeaux, 
or other wines, and tens of thousands of Cali- 
fornians and other Americans buy them at fancy 
prices. But one of the most curious things in this 
line came lately to light in Paris and inquiries 
are being now instituted regarding a serious 
charge of fraud against one of the largest dealers 
here. Not content with adding 45 per cent, of wa- 
ter, he is alleged to have also added certain chem- 
icals. The authorities noticed that a considerably 
larger quantity of wine left the premises than 
went in, and steps were taken to prove the sus- 
pected fraud. But an analysis of the wine sent 
out failed to reveal any but the ordinary chem- 
ical properties which go to constitute the "good 
wine of France," although there could be no doubt 
that some of it was artificial. Further evidence 
of the latter fact was established by the results 
given by a meter placed in the sewer underneath 
the premises, to register the quantity of water 
which went down the drains as against the quan- 
tity which entered the place. It was abundantly 
clear from a comparison of the wine-merchant's 
meter and that thus surreptitiously put in by the 
police, that a good deal of what went in as water 



went cut as wine. But how the conversion of this 
water into wine was effected remains a mystery, 
which the authorities are still bothering them- 
selves about. And this is only one of many. But 
France can't hold a candle to America as an 
adulterator, I am forced to admit. 

Of all the delightful sounds in a foreign land 
there is none so endearing (to me) as the voice of 
an American. Even if Lindley Murray Is some- 
times badly treated, I adore the sound of an Amer- 
ican voice. There was even pleasure in hearing 
him say "Them things wasn't no good any way," 
and downright ecstacy in hearing her exclaim "I'd 
rather have a good piece of strawberry shortcake 
than all the French pastry in Paris." But the fol- 
lowing are what are more frequently heard: 
"There never was such a lot of mercenaries be- 
fore;" "Same old thing every day at dinner;" "As 
between the Frenchman and his dog, I think the 
latter is the cleanest;" "O, they have raised our 
rates three times in one month; I'hank God I'm 
an American;" "Well, let me get out of this and 
I'll never come here no more;" "The damned rob- 
bers, they've raised me from thirty to sixty-five 
francs for a single room and no bath:" and much 
more in the same strain — but all mellifluous be- 
cause of the .lovely American accent. 

It is estimated by strategists in statistics that 
there are twenty thousand native-born Americans 
who are permanent residents of Paris, and that 
this figure has been augmented to nearly thrice 
that number who are here on their way from their 
pilgrimage to Rome, or among the flow to Ober- 
Amniergau, or who have come here just to do the 
Exposition. At any rate, the American is in evi- 
dence. He is the poorest dressed man in Paris, 
and about the only person of account who does 
not wear a top hat. The Frenchman is the best 
dressed man on the globe, and the Englishman 
comes next to the American in general slouchi- 
ness. There are a good many Englishmen also in 
Paris just now, but the Briton is scarcer than 
eleven years ago. Between the two English is 
as much heard on the boulevards and at the Ex- 
position grounds as French. The American wears 
a sack coat or a cutaway and a derby or a slouch. 
He patronizes the cafes and American bars and 
spends money like a prince. He lives at the best 
hotels and rides half the day and night in a car- 
riage. He smokes a cigar or cigarette, but his 
manners at the table, on the street and in com- 
pany are invariably good. The Englishman 
wears a silk hat or a straw, dresses more carefully 
than the American, but in colors. He carries a 
short cane, keeps a bulldog pipe between his teeth 
and looks as if he was afraid somebody or every- 
body would do him up. He occupies "lodgings" 
and drinks and eats all by his lonesome. He is 
rude (not vulgar) in manner and speech. He is 
essentially an Englishman, whether he be from 
London, Birmingham or the Isle of Wight. He is 
staunch and kind and often grateful. But he is 
generally offensive without knowing it. He toler- 
ates an American on account of his Anglo-Saxon 
proclivities, doncher-know? and looks upon all, 
Frenchmen as "only monkeys, anyhow;" all he 
knows of the United States he obtained from 
"Martin Chuzzlewit," and Paris isn't in it with 
Little Muggleton. 

0, it is so dead easy for an American girl to get 
away with an English one. The former was 
bright and pretty, and knew it, 'undoubtedly, but 
did not seem to. She sat at the head of the table 
at dinner with her father and mother on her 
right and two English girls and their father on 
her left. She got away with the English women 
every time. One day one of the latter said to the 
diabolically pretty and clever one at the head: 
"Why do you Americans persist in saying I reck- 
on? We never use the word reckon unless in 
speaking of Aggers." Said the American beauty. 
"There is no such word as Aggers in our vocabu- 
lary. We say flgures." O, mamma! Then, on an- 
other occasion, the other English girl let Ay at the 
superb one: "Why do you Americans always say 
Yaa-aas? We English say Yes." Well, the reply 
nearly took away my breath. It was short, quick 
and decisive, and ended the dialogue: "Why do 
you English always say Na-o-w? We Americans 
say No!" 

If you were living here in Paris and saw the 
avalanches of wreaths and other Aoral offerings 
that are part of every funeral you would not doubt 
that one corporation employs directly and indi- 
rectly half a million people in their manufacture! 
And you would not doubt that the clergy of Paris 
and some others are appalled at the outlay. In- 
deed, the question whether the money paid for 
funeral wreaths would not be spent to greater ad- 
vantage in masses for the dead is causing no little 
stir in Paris. For some time past a portion of the 
metropolitan clergy have been deprecating the 
money spent on outward show at funerals. They 
have made no secret of the fact that their princi- 
pal objection to extravagance in this direction is 



western Granlm, 



9 



the circumstance that it tends to lessen the num- 
ber of masses ordered by the relatives of deceased 
persons. At first sight the matter would seem 
solely to concern the clergy and the members of 
their congregations. However, the manufacturers 
of funeral wreaths, an important industrial cor- 
poration employing over half a million workers, 
arc not of this opinion. They declare that the 
campaign in progress must seriously injure their 
trade. Moreover, they are not disposed to submit 
with resignation to the fate that threatens them. 
So they have drawn up a petition which has been 
presented to the Chamber of Deputies. This peti- 
tion ascribes the move to the Jesuits and goes on 
to berate the Archbishop of Paris, "a Statepaid 



functionary, who has ventured to use his influence 
in favor of the suppression of the ancient and 
touching custom of offering flowers and funeral 
wreaths in homage to the dead." Finally, the pe- 
titioners implore the intervention of the Chamber 
on the score that the clergy are trying to obtain 
money by false pretences when they advise that 
the sums spent on wreaths should be devoted to 
masses. "Masses have no efficacy." says the peti- 
tion, "and those who pay for them are deluded by 
persons who assume imaginary powers and credit 
with a view of creating the belief that they can 
bring about chimerical events" — acts which, as the 
petition points out, are forbidden and punished bv 
the code. BEN C. TRUMAN. 



15 he Country f R_ ourvd 

-> Notes on the Progress of Our Country ^ ^ ^ 



AN increase of $.1, 500.000 in the taxable prop- 
erty of Los Angeles for the year 1900 is re- 
ported by City Assessor Ward. 

Jt J* :< 

The city is preparing to considerably extend the 
electric light service. Over one hundred new 
lights are to be added. 

J* & v* 

Considerable lumber is still cut in Southern 
California. One company which operates in the 
mountains near Redlands is getting out (iO.000 feet 
daily. 

Three tons of gold arrived this week in Seattle 
from Alaska. These tons of gold from the far 
north will do more to insure prosperity than all 
the political platforms ever written. More tons 
are said to be on the way. The civilized world 
has a profound respect for gold. 

dt & j* 

At last the artesian water, so abundant between 
this city and Santa Monica is to be utilized. The 
irrigation plant is nearly completed and cost $30,- 
000. This will make productive a large area here- 
tofore only planted to barley. 

tg£ t$ 

One prominent feature of the oil country of Ohio 
and Indiana is the metamorphic rock, showing the 
outlines and structure of fossil coral distorted by 
heat and pressure. A quantity of this rock has 
been discovered in San Diego county, which en- 
courages the San Diegans who are anxiously 
awaiting an oil boom. 

An immense walnut crop is assured at Fuller- 
ton, and the orange crop in sight is the heaviest 
ever known. 

Between Los Angeles and Redondo a large area, 
both this and last year, was planted to cucumbers 
with good financial results. A yield of ten tons to 
the acre is reported, in one case creating a neat 
little bank account for the fortunate individual. 
J* -J* ,* 

The cannery at Pomona has been putting up 
20,000 cans of apricots daily. Both the canneries 
in East Los Angeles have also opened up, and at 
the heighth of the season will each employ from 
three to four hundred hands — mainly women and 
boys. The money paid in wages aggregates a 
considerable sum during the season. 

J* J* 

Arizona figures largely in the present population 
of Southern California. Santa Monica and Phoenix 
present, by contrast, startling differences in tem- 
perature during the months of July and August. 
The winter climate of Arizona cannot be surpassed 
in the world. In summer that ancient, moss-cov- 
ered story of the dead Yuma soldier who sent back 
for his blankets does not seem a wild exaggera- 
tion after you have "summered" a few weeks in 
Arizona. 

vSt J/t ■< 

Prospects for a fair bean crop in Santa Barbara 
and Ventura counties have greatly improved of 
late. This humble vegetable is a money maker 
where it can be grown successfully. The bean 
men have suffered from the drouth, to some ex- 
tent, but, as compared with the barley growers, 
they have done well. Many fields in Santa Clara 
valley will yield a full crop this year. 

.4 * jl 

Bakersfield is grading streets, constructing sew- 
ers and sidewalks, and next to Fresno, is the live- 
liest town in the San Joaquin valley. Bakersfield 
is practically located on an island formed by the 
Kern river. The country round is as fertile as the 
valley of the Nile. Oil and water may not mix 
but they are just now creating a city across the 
Tebacbapl divide. 

The gold strikes on the Alaska beaches recall 
the fact that years ago considerable excitement 
occurred when the "color" was found in the sands 
of the California coast. Many claims were staked 
out, and much prospecting done, but the returns 
did not prove remunerative enough to continue 
working them. It is not. difficult, however, to find 
gold in every pan of beach sand washed out at 
anv of our ocean resorts. 

* < Jt 

Preparations for the construction of the new tile 



factory at Tropico are being made. This will be 
one of the largest manufacturing establishments 
in California. It is no doubt the fore-runner of 
many more to follow. The era of cheap fuel is at 
hand, and expansion has opened innumerable new 
markets. Manufacturing on a large scale will give 
Los Angeles a prosperity never before dreamed of. 
J* ,< ■< 

Los Angeles has the Chicago Tribune to thank 
for an advertisement calculated to greatly 
strengthen this city in the estimation of the busi- 
ness world. The Tribune gives Los Angeles a to- 
tal increase in population, since the last census, 
of 139 per cent. — the largest growth of any city in 
the United States. Few and far between are other 
cities which approach at all this marvelous per- 
centage of increase. The fact is encouraging, still 
it is safe to predict that Los Angeles is to surpass 
in the future all past records of rapid growth. As 
the years go by a trip to the Pacific Coast becomes 
more a pleasure jaunt than the serious matter it 
was once considered. The railroads are striving 
to make travel more comfortable and cheaper than 
staying at home. Last winter the largest number 
of tourists in the history of Los Angeles arrived. 
It may be added that the coming winter will, un- 
less all signs fail, be another record breaker. 

J. S. Winslow of New York is now in this city, 
having just returned from a trip which included 
a visit to Panama, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, San 
Salvador, Guatemala, Central America, and the 
western coast of Mexico. Mr. Winslow is a repre- 
sentative of the Cooper Commercial Company, but 
his journey was mainly made for health and 
pleasure. "At Panama," said he, "the new canal 
company is continuing its work, which seems to 
be done in a businesslike manner. A revolution 
was brewing in Columbia while 1 was there, and 
since I left I learn there have been several battles. 
Such affairs appear, however, not to affect foreign 
interests. I am surprised more concern is not 
taken in the Panama canal in this country. Some 
think the work is only being done by seculators 
who hope to sell out, but well informed engineers 
say the big cut will be made. A fearful sight is 
the waste and destruction caused by the old man- 
agement. The climate has destroyed much, but 
enough remains to give one an idea of what hap- 
pened. Millions of dollars of machinery have 
rusted to atoms on the isthmus. For several 
miles, I was told, the ground was literally filled 
with the bodies of canal laborers. Neither Pana- 
ma or Aspinwall are prosperous. No one stays on 
the isthmus if it is possible to get away — that is 
no foreigners do. The present traffic is but a 
shadow of what it formerly was. 

"Costa Rica was quiet when I was there. The 
coffee trade has been dull of late. Coffee is the 
main product of the country. Very few citizens 
of the United States are to be found there or in 
fact anywhere in Central America. All the way 
up to Acapulco, Mexico, I was impressed by the 
fact that our country is poorly represented. The 
business is mainly in the hands of the Germans 
and English. At nearly every port you see the 
flag of imperial Germany flying from substantial 
vessels, and England is not far behind. Even 
Chill has a better showing than the Great Re- 
public. True a few antiquated tubs from San 
Francisco make semi-monthly visits. They bring 
little, but carry away considerable coffee. 

"The people of the I'nitod States made a sad 
mistake when, in 1884, they failed to elect James 
G. Blaine president. That sagacious statesman 
understood the Spanish-American, and bis plans, 
if matured, would have given us the trade of the 
southern countries. Blaine is remembered kindly 
everywhere south of the border line for bis tact 
and diplomacy. 

"The Germans are working hard, and with con- 
siderable success to prejudice the natives against 
the 'Yankees.' They say we intend to dominate 
all of America if we can get a chance. Probably 
Hamburg, (iennany, has six times the trade with 
Central America San Francisco controls. 

"I found Americans in Nicaragua — there are 
only a few — incredulous regarding the immediate 
construction of the canal. They say the Pacific 
railroads will bar any action for many years to 
come. At least one Oalifornian there doubted if 
the Pacific Coast would be much benefited by the 



canal. This heretic thinks it would give New York 
the benefit of the expansion trade. Of course, I 
bi lieve the canal would be the best thing the 
United States ever went into. It would treble 
trade all around. 

"Life in Central America has its advantages and 
disadvantages. No one is in a hurry. People do 
not wear out on account of work. It is always 
tomorrow there. The well-to-do classes are hos- 
pitable, polite and genial. The poor are very poor, 
but do not seem to mind it. They smoke the ever- 
lasting cigarette and die— principally of old age. 
Now and then Don Juan Sebastian de Flores, or 
some other Don, starts a revolution, and for a time 
it seems as if blood would be really shed but it 
rarely is. 

"Except in elevated locations the climate is hot 
and malarious. Foreigners are not long lived un- 
less they take great precautions. Fever is com- 
paratively rare among the natives. 

"All the foreign employes expect to be paid in 
gold. To a Bryan man it must seem strange that 
a clerk who might draw a salary of $21f» a month, 
Mexican dollars, should be willing to accept and 
even prefer $100 of Uncle Sam's gold but such Ap- 
pears to be the case. 

"Mexico is prosperous. Not the masses, but 
those engaged in commercial pursuits. The silver 
standard helps Mexican business interests because 
Hie masses are too ignorant to note the fluctuation 
of the dollar. The silver standard, if established 
in the United States, would quickly cause a riot 
among our working people for its repeal. Diaz 
makes a good ruler, but lie is practically an Em- 
peror." 

HERBERT. 

ED U CATI0NAL 



Brownsberger 
Home School .... 

Shorthand and Typewriting 

903 South Broadway. Tel. White 4871 

This institution owns the largest number 
of typewriters of any school in California 

Touch method in typewriting exclusively. More posi- 
tions are offered to the school at a gond salary than 
we can till. Only individual work. Office training. 
Machine at home free. Hours !i to 12; 1.30 to 4.30 

SPECIAL SUM/IER RATES 



) Loi /?nge/es /T)/) [) — 



Tel. Kliick 2051 



312 XV. Third St. Tel. Black 2051 * 

* Oldest, largest and best training school in the city. £ 
Thorough, practical courses of study in Bookkeeping, » 
Shorthand, Typewriting and Telegraphy. College *■ 

f trained and experienced teachers. Best equipped 4t 

Business College room West of Chicago. This is the ijfr 

• only school in the city that has the right of using the ^ 
■Ff Budget of Voucher System of Bookkeeping. Come and 

t see it. Our students have the advantage of Spanish, 

.+ Herman and Lou V. Chapin's Course of l ectures free. * 

J j It will cost you nothing to investigate the merits of * 

-if our school before going elsewhere. Special rates for +, 

# the summer. Catalogue and full information on ap 

• plication. Address 

~* L. A. Buslnesn College, 212 W. Third St., I,. A. 



Los Angeles 
Military Academy | 

Begins its seventh year September 25th. s 
Classical, English and Scientific Courses. 
The common branches thoroughly taught. 
Prepares for business. 

Sanford A. Hooper, Head Master 

Edward L. Hardy, Associate 
Catalogue mailed upon request. Visitors 
take Westlake (First street) Traction cars. 



s 



t 



Los flnyeles School 
ol Dramatic Art. . . 



Incorporated Sept. 1X'J9 



Tel. James 711 



Training for the I'latform, Ptllpll and Stage Cultivation of 
the Speaking Voice for every purpose. 

DlRKCTOHN-ti. A. Dobiiison, .lohii I). Hooker, W. C. Patter- 
son, B. It. Baumgardt, Sheldon Borden. 

The Art Building, III I S. Mill St., Lot AngeleR 

PHYSIC! \ns ,\m> BURGEONS 



TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 

306 308 WII.COX BUILDING 
Ites. Tel., White 6011 



Hours— 10-19 a.m. 
2-4 p.m. 
Office Tel., Main 179 
RXUDENC*: 919 S. UNION A VK 



NETTIE E. HAMMOND, M. D. 

i: 420-122 

l.mighliii I'.iillrllng 



Tel. James 2271 



D. CAVE 

I. A S K K RSI 1 1 M BLOCK 
1211 West Third Street 



Tel. Main UUfl 



II) 



Western Graphic 



Music and Art 

Criticism and Comment V» 15he Doings of Artistic Folk 




MUSIC AND ART ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 

VOICE 

COMPOSITION 
THEORY 

Phone Maiu 885 230 Hellman Block 



ARNOLD KRAUSS 

SOLOIST AND VIOLIN TEACHER 

Pupil ol Cesar Thomson 
Studio: 807 W. Seventh st. Tel. Green 1558 



MISS JENNIE WINSTON 

SOPRANO 

Concerts and Recitals. Vocal Instruction. 

Pupil of Madame Rosewald, San Francisco ; F. H. Tubbs, New 
York; Anna Miller Wood, Bostou, and Geo. Sweet, New York. 

Studio, Rooms 312-313 Blanchard Building. 
Residence, 1372 S. Flower St.; Res. Tel. Bine 3682. 

HARLEY HAMILTON 

CONCERT VIOLINIST ANI> TEACHER 

Ensemble playing a specialty. 
Musical Director Los Angeles Theatre. 
Pupil of Emile Sauret, London, and Slmonettl, London. 

Studio, 320-321 Blanchard Building 



MISS FRANCES DAVIS 

VOCAL INSTRUCTION 

RESIDKNCE: STUDIO: 
Abbottsford Inn 418-419 Blanchard Bid 



CHARLES F. EDSON 

BASSO CANTANTE 

Engagements Accepted for 

Concert, Oratorio Studio 
AND Opera ... 611 WITMER STREET 

Telephone James 78 

M O R T ON R M~X SON 

Teacher of Piano, Organ and Harmony 

Organist Pasadena Presbyterian Church 
Studio: Blanchard building Residence: 250 State Street 

Los Angeles Pasadena 



MISS MIRIAM B. BARNES 

Piano Soloist and Teacher of the Piano 

Pupil of 

Heir Thllo Becker 253 SOUTH GRAND AVE . 

CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

HARMONY COUNTERPOINT 
COMPOSITION VIOLIN 

Studio Tajo Block, cor. 1st .i Brd'y Residence 632 Burlington 

MRS. J. M. JON E S 

TEACHER OF THE HARP 

Address care of So. Cal. Music Co. RESIDENCE: 
216 W. Third St., Los Angeles Lincoln Park 



MADAME MARIE HUNI 

TEACHES OK SINGING 

Classical Music a Specialty. 
Studio, 028 S. Hill Street Los Angeles 

T>. FL MORRISON 

VOICE BCILUING 
77 and 78 Potomac Block Los Angeles, Cal. 

MISS MAUDE P R I EST 

GUITAR LESSONS 
specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Pupil M.S. Arevalo STUDIO ; 4">2% So : Broadway 

Room 25 

ANNA VIRGINIA METCALF 

SOPRANO SOLOIST 

Pupil of Henschel. Shakespeare and Vocal Studio 

Randegger, London, and 1011 S. Olive 

Vanniui, Florence, Italy Tel. White 6821 

aT will hartit z 

Piano, Harmony, Composition, Etc. 
Los Angeles 311 BLANCHARD MUSIC and ART BLDG. 

et7w a rTs. w a r r e n 

MANDOLIN ANO GUITAR 

STUDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall 
Mornings at Pasadena Directoi Throop Institute 

Afternoons at Los Angeles Mandolin and Guitar Club 

ROLLA E. GARDN Ell 

BANJO, MANOOLIN, GUITAR 

String Orchestra Sicnio. 244 South Hill St 



: 
s 



APROPOS of the recent discussion relative to 
the so-called unsatisfactory condition of 
musical matters in this city, which by the 
way, are clearly no worse than they are elsewhere, 
and in some respects, much above the average of 
the status of cities of similar size, I may again 
point out that the cheapening of the art by those 
whose duty and whose interest it should be to up- 
hold it, lies at the bottom of what trouble there 
may be. I noticed in a Sunday paper a small ad- 
vertisement which said that lessons on the piano 
are to be obtained at "50 cents an hour" from "a 
pupil of Herr Becker." I haven't the faintest idea 
who this "pupil" may be or what stress of circum- 
stances may have driven this student to offer to 
lead the youthful aspirant along the narrow and 
crooked path at a rate one sixth of what Herr 
Becker customarily charges, but it strikes me that 
the course is most injudicious for the person ad- 
vertising and certainly both disrespectful and, in 
some people's views, damaging to Herr Becker. I 
recall a case in San Diego, where a barber took 
lessons on the violin for one month and then had 
the temerity to open a "studio" across the street 
from his talented teacher and on his shingle an- 
nounce his being a "pupil" of the latter. The clai- 
mant was, of course, secure in his position, for 
he had taken lessons, but it is comforting to know 
that the annoyance he caused his teacher was 
short-lived and he did no harm of a permanent 
sort. It is not to be expected that a pupil of Hen- 
Becker, or of any other teacher of acknowledged 
standing, should or could ask the same rate of 
tuition even for preparing pupils for the better 
teacher, but depreciating one's knowledge and 
qualifications to fifty cents for an hour's teaching 
is either an indication of doubt as to fitness or a 
sad case of dire necessity. This same fifty-cent 
teacher may, later on, if the Fates are propitious, 
be anxious to raise the tariff, when the fifty-cent 
ghost will be sure to rise up and wiggle its ghastly 
arms. 

The same principle of cheapness is to be applied 
to those who give vocal lessons a "cut rate" price. 
In this case the damage is infinitely more serious 
lor a voice .once ruined can never be restored or be 
made what it would have been had a good teacher 
had the training of it from the beginning. I am 
strongly in favor of doing away with the promis- 
cuous singing in the public schools where teachers 
are really ignorant of the first principles of vocal 
training endeavor to do two or three part work 
with their pupils, and assigning, without a fear 
of the consequences or a knowledge of the range 
and scope of the youthful voice, these parts to 
children who are forced to strain their delicate 
organs in order to obey the behests of their peda- 
gogic guide. Class singing is more dangerous than 
a massed chorus sung lately in unison with only 
i he void' qualities to lend color, and in the latter 
case children whose parents are opposed, through 
Hi., knowledge of the risk the child is running, 
need not necessarily sing. But when the matter is 
carried to the length as it appears to be in the 
county schools where vocal remissness is made 
to militate against a pupil's class standing, it is 
evident that those who directed this sort of an or- 
dinance or rule are fitter to be butchers of throats 
than conservators of one of the most delicate or- 
gans in the human body. With such a rule in force 
it is clear that children, in order to make a class 
showing, are forced to compete at whatever cost, 
and the ignorant and senseless maker of the law 
probably could not be made to realize the harm 
that is being done. Outside of the cities the en- 
forcement of this rule is left to any teacher who 
may be handy, whether qualified or not, and I sup- 
pose even those who realize what responsibility 
rests upon them and what risks they are incurring 
would not dare to evade the law. Meddling of this 
sort is most reprehensible. The school books de- 
voted to the theory of music are surely curious 
and wonderful enough to satisfy a most inordinate 
pedagogue, and there is the pleasant contemplation 
that what may find temporary lodgment in the in- 
fantile brain will readily yield to a "sponging out" 
as the child grows out of the school; but a voice 
once tampered with cannot be restored to its first 
malleable conditions. 

To return to our mutton. Why do not the 
teachers of the city, the responsible and conscien- 
tious ones, at least, come together in friendly 
union and decide upon a scale of rates and abide 
by them consistently? Barring two or three "wire- 
pullers" who are Ismaelitish in their selfish ten- 
dencies and who in the end will wreck themselves 
on rocks of their building, the mutual relations of 
the teachers of music in the city are much more 
intimate and friendly and charitable than they are 
in any community in the country. There is no jeal- 
ousy in this class. They attend each others' re- 
citals, they visit each other in a broad spirit of 
friendship and there is practically no back-biting. 
It is all an honest, open and above-board rivalry 
and many of the teachers adhere as closely to the 
code of ethics that prevails among physicians and 
lawyers as do the members of these professions, 
and decline to take a pupil from another teacher 



unless a satisfactory and complete explanation is 
made. With this association of practical and 
practicing musicians perfected it would be an easy 
matter to settle the "choir difficulty." The singers 
would be in position to make proper and convinc- 
ing representations to the people who have the 
handling of the funds which support the choirs and 
a reasonable compensation could thereby be se- 
cured. It would not then be necessary for singers 
and players to secure appointments in more than 
one church in order to eke out an existence, and 
it would prompt young and struggling singers to 
insist in stronger terms that, vocal attributes be- 
ing equal, the preference should be given to those 
who have to make their living, rather than to 
those who are not actually in need of the money, 
having comfortable homes or other sources of in- 
come. The beggarly "five-dollars-a-Sunday" rule 
would then fall into disuse, the singers would re- 
ceive a wage more in proportion to the valuable 
services they render and a lifting of the standard 
of both the singer and what they sing would be 
an immediate and beneficial result. 

I wish some one church had the nerve and good 
business acumen to select a high-priced choir, 
making it a model, both in quality and perform- 
ance; the mere announcement in an advertising 
way would be worth ten times what would be paid 
the singers. There is nothing that will draw an 
audience to a church as quickly as good music. 
That is the purpose of an advertisement; if the 
salesman in a store or the minister in a church 
cannot then hold an audience by interesting them, 
that is not the fault of the advertisement, yet, 
even if the minister fails, the choir will have done 
what it set out to do. It is an experiment that 
could easily be tried. It should be as easy, if the 
facts are properly presented to a vestry or other 
governing board, to raise two or three thousand 
dollars a year for the support of the musical part 
of the service as to raise more than that amount 
in order to secure a minister who has "fashion- 
able" attritbutes, and I venture to say that the 
church or congregation which would undertake the 
experiment, and would entrust to competent hands 
the selection of a choir which should be the very 
best obtainable here or in the neighborhood, whose 
members would be sufficiently compensated to be 
justified in rehearsing more than once a week, 
and whose director would be given only a broad 
instruction to furnish the best music that his 
forces are capable of presenting in a finished man- 
ner, would not regret it, and, more than that would 
never be willing to revert to the present stupid 
and unenlightened custom of treating the musical 
end of the church service as a necessary and un- 
avoidable evil. The filled pews and the demand 
for increased seating space would be the most po- 
tent argument against such a course. The recent 
discussion of the choir trouble has directed the 
public attention to the necessity for a remedy and 
thai I have pointed out. E. F. KUBEL. 

Mrs. Maud Menardi, whose display of brilliant 
technique in the "Concert Polonaise" of Wieniaw- 
ski, at the pupils' recital of Mr. Edwin H. Clark 
at Blanchard Hall last week aroused the hearty 
applause of the large audience that filled the hall 
to repletion, is the concert mistress of the Ladies' 
Philharmonic Orchestra. Mrs. Menardi's excellent 
work as leader of the string choir at the recent 
concert of the Philharmonic also demonstrated the 
fact that she is a capable and thoroughly con- 
scientious musician. 

Mr. Edwin H. Clark, the well-known teacher of 
violin and cornet, leaves tomorrow morning for 
Indian river on a month's outing. Mr. Clark will 
be accompanied by Mrs. Clark and Miss Heinze- 
man. The deadly rifle and full piscatorial outfit 
will occupy a conspicuous corner of their luggage, 
for it is the intention of the party to have a jolly 
good time at whatever cost to the finny tribe and 
wild game in that section of the Pacific slope. 

& S 

Prof. M. S. Arevalo 

On Monday morning the last sad rites were per- 
formed over the remains of Prof. M. S. Arevalo, 
whose sudden death came as a shock to the local 
musical world of Los Angeles. For many years 
the strong, energetic personality of Prof. Arevalo 
has been a conspicuous factor in the musical life 
of our city. Although a Mexican by birth, Sefior 
Arevalo seemed to imbibe almost intuitively the 
push and energy which characterize the American 
citizen in these western sections of our great re- 
public. His was a nature that could not be satisfied 
with anything below the first rank in his special 
branch of musical endeavor, and it was' these qual- 



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1 1 



ities, exceptional as they are, that at once placed 
him at the head of guitar and mandolin instruct- 
ors here, which position he held intact up to the 
time of his untimely death, for his years had 
barely reached fifty-eight in number. The name 



of Professor Arevalo can truly be said to have 
been a household word in this community, and 
many homes will preserve the memory of the old 
professor with affectionate regard. Requiscat In 
pacem. 



With 

Doings 3 Among 



t K 



e Butterflies 

People ^ in the 5 Gay ^ Life 



LOOKS like the summer boy was learning to 
play the mandolin with his feet. Why? 
Don't ask me. But I think this is nice 

poetry: 

Let us play a game for two, 

Let's pretend that I love you; 

And let's play that you love me in return, 

Let us have a sweet flirtation. 
What does the poetry have to do with the feat 
of the mandolin? I can't imagine, really. 
Only— 

This sort o' calls up — Catalina for two, a tent, 
a hammock, sweet tinklings and — so forth, all too 
delightful for "any use," as my English friend 
would say. The English are so vague, I do think 
there is anything at all vague in the sweet tink- 
lings and that. 

The newspapers say that Catalina this Glorious 
Fourth eclipsed, &c, &c. How convenient. And 
what a good thing it would be if the gay doings 
at the summer isle would keep on being eclipsed 
right along for a while — say until the end of Sep- 
tember. 

They say that everybody is going to Catalina in 
the course of time. It is quite the proper caper 
to leave even your happy summer home, no mat- 
ter where it is, for the joys of the Metropole ve- 
randah for at least two weeks, of the season. 
Then as to the young folks— I quite assure you no 
growing up boy or girl thinks the summer has 
been properly spent without a certain number of 
dances at the Pavilion. 

Taking outings in general — to those of us who 
stay at home it is very bourgeois to "go away" 
and really we can't see how some people can be 
"cooped up" all summer and live in their trunks. 
But it is necessary sometimes of course for some 
folks to be in the swim. 

Time was when no newspaper dared take it upon 
itself to chronicle society doings after June 30th. 
Now it is different. What has given the 400 the 
necessary backbone not only to have functions but 
allow them to be bruited abroad in the land — of 
print— is hard to say, but the vertebral stiffness is 
there and it has come to stay. Is it that the de- 
markations of the season shall have for its first 
date July 15th or are entertainments to be the 
order of the entire summer? Time will decide. 
Some of the swellest things of the year are booked 
for the first half of this month and I hear of 
some very large affairs that are whispered for the 
latter days of July. The new home of the Van 
Nuys' on Loma Drive is to be thrown open on the 
ninth for a large dancing party, and invitations 
are out for a card party to be given by Mrs. Earl 
B. Miller on the twelfth in honor of Miss Annis 
Van Nuys, that is considered one of the notable 
affairs of the year. 

^8 t$ 

It is one of the indisputable canons of the sea- 
son to have a fad. I am only speaking of women- 
society women, men don't count. The latest sum- 
mer fads I have noticed are the quill pen and Mr. 
Mathieu. I know that, for some time back the 
girl that patronized golf, the automobile (coat) 
Belgian hares, &., also kept a "quill." Then she 
was odd. But now I give you my word the girl 
who has none of these is the one that is odd. 
And along with these fads, not the least of them 
is the aristocratic members of the Prawley com- 
pany. 

They say that Mr. Mathieu is all right. His 
people were prominent in society in San Francis- 
co and he was what is popularly known as sought 
after. And now all Los Angeles, that is to say all 
Los Angeles society women worship him, and the 
poor man is kept busy all day long answering tel- 
ephone messages from "ladies" inviting him out. 
Indeed, it is not all nonsense. He is the rage. 
He has the entree to our best homes and I could 
name off a string of houses that find him a con- 
stant visitor. If I wished to be merely tentative 
I might make up the old story of the photographs 
and notes and things that handsome actors receive 
daily from their feminine admirers, but I do not 
know this of Mr. Mathieu. He may receive all 
the tokens of the nature I have enumerated for all 
I know. But I do know that whenever the "pet" 
actor leaves the stage he is immediately sur- 
rounded by a "bevy" of society girls and matrons. 
How do they manage to get acquainted with him 
is the cry of everybody— that does not know him. 
Don't ask me. 

They say Mr. Mathieu has the dearest little wife 
and two lovely children. I do not know whether 
they are in Los Angeles or not. They may be in 
San Francisco. 

^8 t£$8 

I knew that young Mr. Chanslor would not stay 
in Los Angeles after he made his pile. They say 
he is going round the world. He merely follows 
out the old saying that when a society man has 



made money or is looking for a wife he leaves 
Los Angeles. The hunt for the wife is perhaps 
the more noticeable of the two. Just think a bit 
and try to recall how many of our best men have 
married elsewhere; "best" in various senses. I 
know of several young swains who were best men 
for all the fellows they knew and then finally got 
out themselves and married some sweet girl from 
— some other place. 

The same way with our best girls. They can't 
find anybody in Los Angeles to suit them. 

There was Mrs. Brandis, formerly Miss Edelman. 
That was a "lovely" instance of a petted girl car- 
ried off by a gentleman from somewhere else. The 
gentleman, by the way, is a wealthy merchant of 
Omaha and possesses various sources of congrau- 
lation. Mrs. Brandis is at present on a visit to 
friends in Los Angeles and has never looked more 
charming in the heyday of her girlish beauty than 
in her matronly "airs" and graces of a six-months 
bride. 

To return to Mr. Chanslor, I believe his sister 



some 200 guests thronged the beautiful rooms 
throughout the afternoon. 

Jt :< 

SANTA MONICA. 

Last year it was Miss Winston and Mr. Woodard. 
This year it will be — but you may do your bet- 
ting on your own account. And if you want to 
take chances on three or four, you may win every 
time. There is pretty nearly always just one co- 
terie of girls at this swell earavanserie and this 
includes one or two Jewish heiresses of Los An- 
geles and then you know some of the greatest 
"parti's" come from San Francisco. It would not 
do at all to give you the hotel list— that looks so 
provincial you know in a society column, as if you 
went in and registered for your Fourth of July 
dinner and then put in the time on the sands. 

And besides you can't prove by this who do the 
summer flirtations. 

Golf brought down a great contingent and the 
ball was kept rolling by all kinds of swelldom. 
There is only one feature about golf that is inter- 
esting and that is that society and his wife or so- 
ciety and her husband — whichever you prefer — go 
in for the game together — it is not one-sided. Be- 
sides its saves space in a newspaper column. If 
you say Holliday, you know at once it is not one 
Holliday, but two — you needn't bother about the 
Mr. and Mrs. At the game on the 4th there were 
playing, Sartori, Griffith, Foster, Silent, Vail, Hol- 
terhoff, Chapman, Bishop, Waring, Seymour, and 
by the way: 

Those red coats and green collars are immensely 
becoming. 





WONDERFUL NOME CITY. 
The illustration shows Nome City, Alaska, which is situated on Tape Nome. The town 
sprung into existence as if by magic. Two years ago it was a desolate piece of Alaskan 
coast; now it is a city of several thousand inhabitants. Gold wrought the wonderful change. 
The precious metal was found first in the sand on the beach. Now the hills and valleys of 
the vicinity, as well as the beach, give rich returns. 



\ 

T 



will accompany him on that tour. In fact, there 
is to be quite a party and there will be some San 
Franciscans included. Miss "Bird" Chanslor is an- 
other whom I would rather have remain in Los 
Angeles or half a score young Lotharios will have 
to look to themselves. Dear, dear, it is too bad, 
that our girls will roam from the home nest. 
There should be some kind of a law— but who is 
it says love laughs at laws. I am sure I don't 
know. 

^8 u$ 

Terminal is becoming so exclusive one can hard- 
ly see it. However, I daresay it is all right. As 
long as Mrs. Sale, the Rules and those hold forth, 
there will of course be some other people. Mrs. 
Sale will have Dr. and Mrs. Davisson and Mr. 
Woodford Davisson as guests at Idlesales this 
month. 

I think there were some "events" this week, but 
since the reception given by Mrs. H. D. Thomson 
and Mrs. James L. Boyle, things have quieted 
down. The reception, by the way. was the open- 
ing of another of those handsome new houses 
which are continuing to grow up about us. This 
is at the corner of Sixth and Bonnie Brae and is 
one of the handsomest places in the Westlake 
district. The Interior decorations are as elaborate 
and in as good taste as the exterior would indi- 
cate and on the occasion of the reception were 
further beautified with most exquisite floral ac- 
cessories. The hostesses were assisted in receiv- 
ing by a number of prominent society women and 



I 

As to the other names? Well, it is a question. 
There were a lot of men playing but it is not quite 
certain whether their wives were there or not and 
having learned wisdom, this column does not com- 
mit itself. 

Prizes wore given and the names of the man and 
woman turning in the best gross score are to be 
inscribed upon the challenge cups. What are the 
names? Ask Mr. Tufts. 

With an established family like that of Senator 
Jones at Santa Monica 'most any resort would 
have revolving about it a certain portion of fash- 
ionables from all directions. This is the case at 
this charming little burg by the sea. The usual 
San Francisco element will make its summer vis- 
itation and it is understood there will be some 
extensive entertaining by the Senator and his fam- 
ily. Mrs. Goodwin, formerly Miss Hamilton, will 
be "among the many guests." 

Mr. and Mrs. Cameron Thorn, the Modinl Woods, 
Chapmans, .Mrs. Plater, Mrs. A rcadla d6 Maker 
and all of the set who have "made" Santa Monica 
the past years are either already in residence or 
expect to make it their outing headquarters by the 
time the season is considered en regie — July the 
15th. 

In riding on the cars from Carpenterla to Ven- 
tura the apex of a distinct anticlinal can be traced 
from the car windows, in the ocean for a distance 
of several miles. Further up this is several miles 
from the shore, but its presence can be traced by 
the oil discolored water. 



12 



Western Graphic 



Oldeit and Largest Bank In Southern California 

FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

('A P1TAL (Paid up) *500,000 SURPLUS and RESERVE »926,742 
Total $1,426,742 

OFFICERS 

L W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

G. HEIMANN Asf istant Cashiei 

DIRECTORS 
W. H. Perry C. E. Thorn A. Glassell 

O. W. Childa L W. Hellman, Jr. L N.Vau Nuys 
J. F. FranciB H W. Hellman L W. Hellman 

•^-Special Collection Department. Our safety deposit depart- 
ment offers to the public, safes for rent in its new Are and 
burglar proof vault, which is the strongest, best guarded 
and best lighted in this city. 



W. C. Patterson, President 
M. P. Green, Vice-Prest. 



W. D, Wooi.wine, Cashier 

E. W. Coe, Asst. Cashier 



THE LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL 850(1,000 SURPLUS and Undivided ProfilLs, JIOO.OOO 
United Slates Depositary 



Letters of Credit and Drafts issued available in all parts of 
the world. 

W. F. BOTSFORD, President J. G. MOSSIN, Cashier 

G. W. HUGHES Viee-Pres. T. W. PHELPS, Ass't Cashier 

CALIFORNIA BANK 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



DIRECTORS: 



\V. F. Botsford G. W. Hughes 
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Homer Laughliu I. B. Newton 

Capital Stock 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 



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$2. r >(>,000 
35,000 



A General Banking Business transacted. 
Special attention given to Collections. 
Exchanges sold on all parts of the world. 



H. i. Wooi.lacott, President 
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K. H. Howei.i., 1st Vice Pres. 
Wakken Giu.ei.en, 2nd V. P. 



STATE BANK & TRUST CO. 

Of Los Angeles. 

PAID-UP CAPITAI HALF MILLION DOLLARS 



R. H. Howell 
H. J. Woollacott 
J. A. Muir 
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DIRECTORS: 

J. W A. Off 
B. F. Porter 
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C. C. Allen 
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Warren Gillelen 
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A General Banking Business transacted. Interest paid on 
Time Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes for rent 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

MAIN STREET SAVINGS BANK 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts. Temple Block 

CAPITAL 8TOCK SUBSCRIBED 1200,000 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUE ...President 

I. N. VAN NUYS Vice-President 

B. V. DUOUE Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Kasper Cohn, H. W. O'Melveny 
L. Winter, O. T. Johnson, T. L. Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. G 
Kerckhoff, A. Haas. 

CHAS. B PIRONI Located at West Glendale 

Sole Proprietor Log Angeles county 

West Glendale Winery and Vineyards 

Producer and Grower of 

High Grade Sweet and Table Wines 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Formerly conducting the Herald Palmistry Department 

Mrs. KATHRYN CASE 

Scientific Palmist 
and Astrologer 

Suite 117 Hellman Building 

223 W. Se"ond St. Los Angeles, Cal. 

| S. CONRADI... 

® ^ Optician, 

Tel. James 1971 matchmaker 

™ nojeveier 

Store ' — 205 S. Spring St. 

Ladies' fine Gold Watches, Diamond Rings, Gold 
Lorgnettes Precious Stones, and everything con- 
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T5he Mad Painter of Perigonne 

By Linda M. Bensel 



IN the struggling little village of Perigonne 
there is a cathedral. In it there are many- 
paintings. They are all of the saints, and the 
altar-piece is particularly fine. To them the vil- 
lage folk point mournfully, yet with a note of 
pride in their voices. "These," they will tell you, 
with a wave of the hand, "are the work of Antoine 
— our mad Antoine." Then, if you are seemingly 
interested, they will tell you of the haggard youth 
with the fine brown eyes that see nothing but 
ghostly shadows, and of the supple hands that can 
destroy but no longer create. 

The early spring days in Perigonne are long 
ones, after the gloom of the winter. Then the 
town is full of strangers, tradesfolk, some tourists 
and others. The tradesfolk merely haggle over 
their wares with the villagers and then go their 
way farther up the mountains. The tourists linger 
and revel in the wealth of scenery and the quaint 
hospitality of the villagers. 

It was on one of these early spring mornings 
that the wife of the inn-keeper was in converse 
with the stranger who had come the night before. 



"The very same," whispered madame, excitedly; 
"and B handsome lad. But sh! Here comes Marie 
Oaudet. She and Antoine are — what you say — 
fiancee, eh? That is it." 

"Aha!" laughed the Englishman. "The pretty 
milkmaid, with the glossy black tresses and the 
cheeks of rose, and — well, my young friend An- 
toine is no fool. I could love that girl myself. 
Our young Antoine makes a wise choice, madame." 

****»*«««* 

The English artist had been a week in the vil- 
lage. He had been to the cathedral. He had 
spoken with Antoine, and had made friends with 
the latter in spite of himself. Moreover, he had 
given Antoine several moments of uneasiness for 
the attention which he bestowed upon Marie Gau- 
det. But Marie only laughed demurely and her 
eyes sparkled mischievously. "Oho, it will serve 
Master Antoine right to tease him. He must needs 
be jealous. Well, then, I will give him cause; for, 
in faith, he is madly jealous without reason." 

"Antoine," called the Englishman from the door 
of the inn one morning, "what is the sketch this 



. 2& a-, j! 

'14 ' 




" CHOOSE BETWEEN OS NOW 1 



He was an artist, so he said, and the sympathies 
of the good woman were at once enlisted. As he 
gave her his confidence, she in turn divulged to 
him all that she knew concerning Antoine, whose 
genius rendered the little stone cathedral so in- 
teriorally beautiful. 

"Ah me," said the good woman, "I have been in 
Paris, and I have seen what their painters can 
do. But our Antoine — ah! you have not seen the 
cathedral. There it is, see, beyond the trees. You 
must go this very day, and ask some favor of Our 
Lady. Her cures are wonderful. There is no one 
ill, now, for whom you might ask? Ah! well, she 
would not refuse yon, I am sure. It was she who 
helped Antoine to send a picture to Paris and have 
it sold. And the grand dames there, in the great 
house, where they tell me it hangs, will say: 
'Ah! the cathedral at Perigonne.' So!" and she 
gave a fair mimicry of a bell of fashion, as if she 
gazed, lorgnette in hand, at the painting. 

While the housewife's volubility amused the 
artist, it piqued his curiosity. In his portmanteau 
there were a few sketches, too, and in England, 
whence he came there were many extremely clever 
people, who would be proud to accept what his 
brush would put on canvas for them. 

"I will go. madame," he said, "I will go and 
see the work of this young genius. But I warn 
him. let him look to his laurels, for I, toi, can 
daub. But who is this Antoine? Is it the slen- 
der youth, who held his head so high when I called 
for my frugal supper last eve?" 



morning — the chateau again? Well, then, we will 
work together, you and I." 

Antoine came swinging along, his knapsack over 
his shoulder, a soft hat crushed over the luxurious 
head of curls. But the dark face was ugly with a 
frown. He had begun to fear this English friend, 
for not only have his laurels been assailed, but 
Marie had tantalized him the livelong morning. 
Why should she tell him of the Englishman's 
broad shoulders, of his fair hair and fine eyes, 
while he himself was small and dark. So he is in 
no humor for the Englishman's banter. 

"What say you— shall we sketch. Monsieur An- 
toine?" called the strong Saxon voice. A roguish 
face peered over his shoulders, and the painter 
of Perigonne lost his temper completely. 

"We will," he replied curtly, and started off 
alone up the rugged road to the chateau. Even a 
cry from Marie did not stop him. He doggedly 
continued his tramp, tramp, up the stony path, and 
nursed his ill humor the while. Marie shuddered, 
for she knew this mood well. The Englishman 
laughed merrily. It was an amusing little comedy 
to him, this love affair between the fair milkmaid 
and the village artist. 

"Uppish is he, the young dog." said he. "If those 
white hands had to till the soil as his fellow-vil- 
lagers, he would lose their suppleness and some of 
his fine airs and graces. There, there," to Marie; 
"do not cry, my pretty one. We'll teach him a 
lesson, never fear. Ah! the rascal. Come, we will 
follow him to the chateau." 



Western Graphic 



The girl looked up in silent admiration of her 
sturdy companion Surely, this Englishman was 
both brave and kind. 

Antoine, in the shade of the chateau, was paint- 
ing furiously. Every dab of the brush was as a 
dab at the Englishman's heart and an oath for 
Marie Gaudet's shining black eyes. Those eyes 
could gleam fire, he well knew; but he would 
humble them. He would teach her what a jealous 
lo'ver was. Ah, foolish Antoine! The bird so near 
at hand, he thought was his. It was well that he 
should look to his laurels. While the Englishman 
flirted desperately with the young coquette, she 
was learning to believe him and to take his glances 
and whispers as from a heart as true as Antoine's. 
Fond, foolish Marie! 

Antoine saw them coming up the road together. 
There was a strange smile about his mouth, and 
the girl was half afraid. "Forgive me, Antoine!" 
pleaded the girl. 

The eyes of the other were opened to the tragedy, 
and he was man enough to wish himself well 
away. Therefore, with his hand in Marie's, he 
faced the painter. 

"We will sketch together, Antoine," he said, 
calmly, "and our friend here shall pronounce opin- 
ion. The best resigns in favor of the other." 

"Have you nothing to say?" Antoine demanded 
angrily, of the girl. "Choose between us now. 
You wanted your choice. Now you have it. 
Choose." 

After a moment of terrified silence Marie whis- 
pered: "Then sketch." 

"Done!" said the painter of Perigonne. "It 
shall be the altar of the cathedral." 

The other acquiesced, and the three started for 
the cathedral. Marie would fain have gone to 
Antoine and pleaded forgiveness, but his black 
looks stayed her. She had never seen him thus 
before. Up the hillside they went, higher and 
higher, swinging along at a reckless space, stum- 
bling over rocks, up to the cathedral. Far below 
in the valley peaceful herds were grazing, watch- 
ful shepherds near at hand. Better to have turned 
back; better to have done with pride, Marie, and, 
after the stormy scene, to go home with Antoine. 
Better to swallow pride, friend Antoine. 

In the cathedral all was dim and hushed, naught 
to break the silence save their own heavy breath- 
ing. Before the altar of Our Lady, who smiled 
upon the restless spirits, the artists esconced 
themselves. Marie sat listlessly by, benumbed by 
some secret force. At a word, she could call upon 
Antoine to desist; and, surely, if he loved her, he 
would heed. Why had this Englishman come into 
this fool's paradise of theirs? He was brave and 
strong, though; and, besides, he was rich, for had 
he not told her? And he would take her to his 
English home. And she mused on. And the two 
men sketched as though for dear life and for 
dearer love. 

"Your light is bad, friend Antoine," the English- 
man said, at length. 

"You have the only good position," was the 
moody response. 

When the sketches were completed, the true eye 
of the artist showed Antoine his defeat staring 
him in the face. The Englishman drew him aside. 

"Friend," said he, "take my sketch. No one will 
know. Remember the ransom, and, besides — I 
don't want the girl." He said this with brutal 
force. "I never wanted her. Here, fool, take your 
prize, and learn to treasure her more highly." 

He was already at the door when a wailing cry 
came from the little figure huddled before the 
main altar. "You are not going to — leave — me — 
here" 

The face of the painter of Perigonne was ashen. 
He slashed at the canvasses with a palette knife 
and tore them asunder. He trampled them under 
foot. 

The Englishman was gone. So was the mind of 

the unhappy Antoine. 
********** 

In Perigonne the mad painter, Antoine, roams 
the village highways and byways. You may see 
him daily about the cathedral, ever sketching, as 
quickly destroying. Marie Gaudet has silver 
threads in her luxuriant locks, and her mouth is 
set with firm, hard lines. She is ever disconsolate. 
For her there are not little chubby arms to clasp 
her round and whisper sweet childish confidences 
into her willing ears. For her there is only pity, 
given ungrudgingly, from the simple-hearted vil- 
lage folk. 

And in the cathedral there are still many paint- 
ings, to which the village folk point with pride. 

:"* v* J* 

(Copyrighted, 1900, Wm. R. Miller.) 

Census of the R^afferty Family 

NO, I'm not buyin' bukes today, nor anny 
other day," said Mrs. Rafferty, as she 
stood with her hand on the door ready to 
shut it in the face of the young man in the hall. 

"But, madam, I'm not selling books. I am an 
agent in the employ of the government. I am the 
census-taker." 

"Oh, you are, are you? Well, I'll let you know 
that you won't take any away from here, bekase 
we have none. So there! 

"My good woman, I am afraid you do not under- 
stand. About once in every decade the govern- 



ment sends men like myself around the country 
to find out by courteous inquiry at what ratio the 
population has increased since the last census and 
to procure other data necessary for preservation 
in the archives of this glorious republic." 

"Oh, 'tis infourmation you want. What does it 
cost? Are you sure you're not from O'Connor's, 
the 'stallment man, bekase we haven't the bed- 
room set paid for yet, all on account o' the wit 
days this month, and Patrick bein' a mason and 
workin' on an outside job. of coorse he couldn't 
work in the rain, small blame to him. and .lamesey 
bavin' a new pair o' shoes a dollar on' a half, as 
I may die where I stand in me shoes. God save me 
from my sins, and there's the dollar I spint goin' 
to Coney's Island lasht Sunda', mebbe I oughtn't 
to spint it. but the sun was so bright, glory be, and 
1 had the new straw hat I'm afther buyin' in Divis- 
ion street for forty-five cints, wid the wax cherries 
an il! Arrah, dear man, come in and sid down. 
Sure yon must beh tired clinibin' up the five stairs. 
Faith, if you are thirsty I have the can if you have 
the price, and I won't be gone while you'll bo 
winkin' twice " 

"But. my dear madam, I'm " 

"Don't say a word about it, darlint, you're tim- 
perance. Here. Katy, you scut you, will you come 
awa' from the windy, or I'll lay me heavy hand on 
you! Do you want to be making dog's mate of 
yourself on the sidewalk below, gur'rl! Oh, sir, 
childer are a sore trial, so they are. What wid 
the washin' and the mendin', the mumps' the 
m'asles! and mebbe if won wouldn't be.takin' beer 
you'd try a drop o' the craytur! Sure, I wouldn't 
be blamin' you for not likin' the beer, the doctor 
was sayin' on'y the other day that beer was bad 
for your kidneys, but my man must have kidneys 
made of brass. It won't be long now before he'll 
be sittin' out on the roof and lowerin' the pail 
down to the saloon below wid a string to be filled 
every hour and singin': 

" 'Beer, beer, glorious beer. 
Fill yerself right up to here. 
Make a whole meal of it. 
Drink a whole pail of it, 

I forgot the rest. But I don't believe all the doc- 
tors say, do you, sir? 

Here Mrs. Rafferty stopped to take breath, which 
enabled the census-taker to say: 

"Excuse me, madam, but we are not getting 
along very fast. Of course, everything you have 
been saying is very interesting from an autobio- 
graphical and sciological standpoint. A sort of his- 
tory of how-the-other-half-lives, you understand. 
But in order to facilitate the work in which I am 
engaged, perhaps it would be better if I should 
ask you a few questions and you should answer by 
a simple affirmative or negative, as the case may 
be. How will that suit you?" 

"Well, I suppose 'tis all right. But divvil a wan 
o'us knows what you're sayin'. Not that I want to 
hurt your feelin's, sir. I always says to my little 
boys and gur'rls, always be polite, says I, bekase 
politeness costs nothin' and nayther man nor 
woman ever threw bricks at a man for bein' polite. 
There's Casey's boy, Mike, that's goin' to the high 
school. You were never introduced to him. sir! 
No? Well, you should see the dignacious way he'd 
be takin' his hat off to a leddy, and him goin' down 
the street! 'Tis the Southern way that pays the 
bosht, never fear. 'Twill capture young and old, 
hump-back and cripple, the lovely and the homely, 
glory be! Eddicashun it not to be sneered at. as 
the goose said after she swallowed the red-hot 
horse-shoe nail. Faith, Willie, you spalpeen, will 
you put down that varnish can! Did you swally 
it? Open your mouth! Oh, my! oh, my! You lit- 
tle larrup, you have your tongue all painted! And 
the gentleman lookin' at you 'Tis hard enough 
gettin' the dirt off the outside of your skin, but 
how'll I scrape the paint off your insides? Now, 
I suppose, you'll have to swally some sand-paper. 
There, there, don't cry. See, the gentleman is 
givin' you a penny. 

" 'Wisht you, wisht you, wisht you my baby. 
Don't you know that your mother is right, 
Sure the noise that you make would drive 

Slattery crazy; 
Wisht you, my darlint, and be a good boy.' 

"You'll excuse me, sir, while I'm rockin' the 
darlint asleed. The varnish is it? Faith he'll for- 
get all about it agin the morning'. Is that you, 
Mrs. Murphy'' come in, acnshla. Will I lend you 
the ind of a quarter of a pound o' tay? Of course 
I will. This is my neighbor, sir. She lives on the 
floor below. Mary dear, this is an agent from the 
gov-mont He is tellin' me purty stories about 
how to behave. I'm hearin' that Forgarty's 
daughter ran away wid Phil Kelly, and he only 
knowin' her three weeks lasht Tuesda'! Look a' 
that now! Sit ye down, sir. Hush, Willie! Well, 
well, did I ever hear the likes o' that? So they 
were married in Jersey, eh? Wonders will never 
sthop, as the duck said when the hawk flew awa' 
wid his tail-feathers. What! Are you goin' sir? 
Well, come in tomorrow, and I'll give you some 
more information. Good day and good luck to 
you."— New York Sun. 



In the 
World 



Strongest 

THE EQUITABLE 
LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY Of New York 

It gives protection that protects (not for a 
day, but fur all time) with ;i 

Surplus of over #61,000,000 

The largest held by any company on earth. 
In surplus there is strength; and from 
surplus earnings 

Dividends are Paid 

More than 

One Million Dollars 

A month was paid to our policy holders in 
L899, and almost as much in 

Living Benefits 

This great financial institution issues 5 
per cent 

Guarantee Income Bonds 

Which may be paid for on the installment 
plan. Send in your date of birth, on 
receipt of which we will mail pamphlet 
giving 1 full discription. 



Southern California Department 



A. M. SHIELDS, 
W. H. CKAMER 



Manager 
Cashier 
414-416-418-420 Wilcox Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



YOSEMITE 
VALLEY 

SEASON NOW OPEN 

Visit the valley early and enjoy the 
spring-tide bloom and the majesty of 
the marvelous waterfalls at their 
Hood. Comfortable stages carry you 
through the great forests of the 
Sierras to this wonderland and there 
are first-class hotels for your accom- 
modation. Any agent of the South- 
ern Pacific Company will make reser- 
vation and give you full particulars 
concerning the trip to the Yoscmitc 
and the companion marvel 

MARIPOSA 
BIG TREES 

Special rates from l.os Angeles and 
Southern California to Yosemitc and 
return, with special sleepers. 
Enquire at or address 

Southern Pacific Co. 

261 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Longo 



Furs stored, made to order and remodeled. 
D. Bonoff, 247 B. Broadway, opp. City Hall. 



The Ladies' and Gentlemen's 

Has now the handsomest establishment of 
its kind in Southern California at 

222 S. Broadway 

It is in accord with the reputation of his 
Garments. They are the recognized 
K Standard 

I Longo ^ "Tailor 



1 Western Graphic 

Amoag the Mvimmers 

In tKe Eyes qf the Critic- -Coming Events 



THE play which was built upon Alphonse 
Daudet's thrilling and moving story 
"Sapho" and exploited at the Burbank dur- 
ing the week, presents as many facets upon which 
the mind may lodge as a diamond, and is as spiky 
as the knotted mace with which the warriors of 
the middle ages were wont to crack skulls. The 
play is powerful; it is surcharged with that ele- 
ment which we call human. It is claimed for it, 
even, that it points a moral besides doing its duty 
in the way of adornment. It is a leaf out of the 
life of a grisette who after being the mercenary 
plaything of innumerable admirers at last feels 
the sting and the consuming fire of what the 
French call the "grand passion." In the class of 
society in which the heroine of the play moves, 
the governing principle of the respectable classes, 
moral restraint, is a neglected quantity, and to 
want is to have and to have is to hold as 
long as possible. But this question has been 
threshed out for many centuries. Virtuous love 
has been upheld. "Virtuous love, exalted by 



her jaded taste. She is to be governed only by 
her own promptings, by her own desires is she to 
be led. So, in the first act, she sends the Baron 
about his business because he bores her, and is 
attracted strongly by the young rustic who dares 
to speak a fearless word for womankind. The 
next immediate step with her, as is the tumult- 
ous nature of the unfettered and passion-driven 
woman of the half-world, is to possess the man 
who has attracted her by being novel and fresher 
than the night-hawks and dawdlers in her coterie, 
and the reign of sin begins. It takes on a halo of 
virtue through the assumption of a condition like 
that of a hallowed respectability and ambitions 
not unlike those of a good and pure woman, 
whose main desire is to make her husband happy. 
The woman is anxious to throw her past behind 
her; she would have, if her fit had lasted, drifted 
into a state of existence entirely antipodal to that 
which she had known from childhood. Unfortu- 
nately she has to do with a weakling, who, after 
the bloom of his passion is worn off, turns into 




KEITH WAKEMAN 
Whose Sapho was the sensation of the Burbank Season 



friendship, seems to be that sort of mixture of 
sensual and intellectual enjoyment, particularly 
suited to the nature of man, and most powerfully 
calculated to awaken the sympathy of the soul 
and produce the most exquisite gratifications. The 
evening meal, the warm house, and the comfort- 
able fireside, would lose half their interest if we 
were to exclude the idea 'of some object of affec- 
tion with whom they were to be shared." This 
state we all know, but that other, lower, condition 
where the home life is at best an aspiration as in 
the unusual case of Sapho and Camille, and where 
the gratification of a temporary, if most powerful, 
desire, is the all-in-all, is fortunately known, by 
experience, to comparatively few of the cleaner 
class of men. The laws of civilized countries 
hedge and safeguard virtue and its practice by 
laws, and the customs of people extol moral re- 
straints and visit severely with heavy penalties 
those who are known to violate its laws. It was 
Malthous who said that if the "bond of conjugal af- 
fection were considerably weakened, it seems prob- 
able that the man would make use of his superior 
physical strength and turn his wife into a slave, 
as among the generality of savages," and that 
there is very much of this every observer of his 
neighbors knows. With a woman of the Sapho 
type her own inclination governs her actions. She 
is tied to no one permanently without her will; 
as soon as she tires of one man she sends him 
adrift and picks up another who appeals more to 



the savage beast which brooks no interference 
with his property. He uncovers the ghosts of 
her past career; he torments himself with the 
shadows of her earlier favors and his crazy jeal- 
ousy is made to crush the blithe-spirited woman 
of the morning into the mire of her former life 
before the day has passed. The woman who had 
been so confident of plucking the flower of virtue 
from the nettle iniquity, first pleads, then im- 
plores, and finally, in righteous anger at the man 
who shows himself much lower in his nature than 
even she, drives him from her door. She lifts 
herself far above him by her action, even though 
he goes to sink his shame, according to his lights 
and the majority of his kind, in the bosom of an 
innocent pure girl just from a convent, who like 
unto a multitude of other guileless maidens jubi- 
lantly offers to assume the task of reforming a 
rake without suspecting the thorough rottenness 
of the apple they are anxious to bite into. The 
woman is consistent in her life. She has thrown 
her past behind her. She repents her loss of temper, 
softens to herself the provocation and attempts 
to plead with her lover to return to her. Her con- 
duct is womanly and woman-like and it paints her 
an angel beside the creature who pretends to 
"have done with her," so that he may again enter 
the ranks of respectability under the cloak of an 
innocent wife. The poor spurned outcast returns 
to her former home but avoids her former life. 
She practices the virtue to which he pretends. 



Then comes into her life a new element, that of 
the father of her child; a man who had loved her 
in earlier years so thoroughly and so passionately 
that he had forged for her and had gone to prison 
in expiation of his fault. This man comes to her, 
offers her a new life far away from temptation 
and greatest boon of all for a hungry sou. beyond 
the social gates, tenders her ..he gift of mar- 
riage. The despised outcast sees the hope of a 
brighter future dawning for her; she sees in h'er 
acquiescence the acknowledgment of the paternity 
of her child, it will gain for it a legal name. Her 
lover has deserted her in order to become respect- 
able, and so why should she hesitate. She prom- 
ises to marry. Then the lover again appears to 
torture her and to ask her to resume their life. 
His passion has mastered him. He begins by be- 
ing humble but soon the jealous craze breaks out 
afresh. The woman is given a glimpse of what 
she may expect, but her love of her child deter- 
mines her, and at the end with a breaking heart 
she forsakes the man she. loves with a devouring 
passion to go with him who will make her an hon- 
ored wife and be a true father to her child and 
whose devotion to her has gained freshness in the 
gloomy prison. The woman emerges from the or- 
deal purified; she has passed through the Are and 
has been cleansed. The role of Sapho was pre- 
sented by Miss Wakeman in a manner that ap- 
pealed both to the critic and to the laity. It was 
powerful, painstaking, and effective in its fidelity, 
and most happily illustrative of the emotional con- 
tent of the part. Some of the lighter colors were 
laid on with an exquisite art and the broader, 
stronger brushings were made by an artist of ster- 
ling merit. By all odds Miss Wakeman showed 
us in this part her finest example of her high 
ability. In life, color and charm, the Parisian 
Phryne was shown to the life, the wiliness of the 
serpent in charming, the ardor of the woman to 
possess, the justifiable rage of the scorned and 
accused partner who was every whit as good as 
was the coward who launched his mad accusations 
against her, and the broken-hearted, tear-torn ex- 
ile in writing the words of separation, all these 
various moods were painted most admirably by 
this talented and resourceful actress. She invested 
a role which had been stamped as shocking by 
the writers and theater-goers of other cities as in- 
decent, with an interest and force that threw this 
element of consideration altogether into the back- 
ground; one saw simply a suffering woman strug- 
gling against her environments and her alliances 
and in the end triumphing over them. In the 
stormier scenes Mr. Reynolds did some clever work, 
but he is of altogether too inelastic and unyielding 
a temperament and make-up to portray the young 
provincial, with the impulses of a young and un- 
sophisticated nature in his breast, and armed for 
combat with the sneering, acid-filled men and wo- 
men into whose midst he is plunged, to make the 
part of Jean in any degree sympathetic in the ear- 
lier scenes. When he can drawl and boil over, as 
the mood calls for it, Mr. Reynolds displays good 
force and discernment, but the role made too great 
a demand upon his versatility. The story hinges 
upon these two; the other characters are incident- 
al. Of the latter Mr. Byrne did the best work, 
showing himself, as on numerous other occasions, 

MAIN 8TEEET 
BET. FIRST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vandevill <• 
Theater 

Week Commencing ftonday, July 9 

Mimical Dale— The Peer of all Instrumentalists 
Sullivan and Weber, in Blanche Marsden's laughable 

sketch, the "The Janitor" 
Gilbert and Goldle, Comedians, Singers and Dancers 
Carrington, Holland and Galpen, a Comedy Trio 
Cha«. K. Grapewln, Eminent Eastern Comedian 
Miss Anna Chance, a Bewitching Comedienne 
Sydney Deane, Celebrated Australian Baritone Sololist 
Miss Lillian Burkhart, farewell week 




PRICES never changing— 25c and 50c: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house: Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 



Concert Hall 
and Cafe *m 



Imperial 

Family Restaurant' 
and Oyster Parlors** 

243 S. SPRING STRKT ond 

j| Phone lOl 242 s. broadwav... 

? Grand Concerts daily from 12 noon to 1.30 p. m. 

1 6 to 7 and 8 to 12 evenings. Orchestra under direction 9 

2 of P. J. Franks, late of Chicago. Everything first-class. 3 
! Thea'er Parties a Specialty 3 
I HALMER & PUTZMAN, Managers. 

Room 20 J, 223 W. Second St., Los Angeles 
Tel. Main 1415 Membership Fee 50 cents ; 

Books rented at 5 cents the week - 5 cents for delivery 

Seventy-five Cents worth of Magazines rented for 25 Cents I 
Five 10-cent Magazines rented for 20 cents. One you keep ' 
For $3.75 we rent you five 10-cent Magazines the month, 
and give you a year's subscription to the 
Western firaphlc 

Subscription" taken for all Publications 
All leading Coast and Eastern Papers on File. 



Western Graphic 



15 



possessed of both sterling merit and an acute 
sensibility and intelligence that enables him to 
make his readings finished and satisfying. Miss 
Barrett, as Irene, Miss Ida Banning, in a dual 
role, Miss Buckingham as Francine, Mr. Mathieu, 
Mr. Gardner, and little Fay Bainter, are all de- 
serving of honorable mention for having contrib- 
uted their share in the production of what, despite 
the many fears expressed by sensitive people, 
proved to be one of the most enjoyable and im- 
pressive performances given here. It is to be re- 
gretted that one was forced to recall the royal 
motto of England so often during the first act, be- 
cause of the evident intention of a portion of the 
young and old men in the audience to emphasize 
certain lines of the first act, absolutely necessary 
to the atmosphere of the happenings, by applaud- 
ing those in which they saw either a hidden or 
patent meaning. These people doubtless saw re- 
flected certain experiences of their own, or they 
found gratification in the spoken words for that 
part of a man's nature which is usually kept well 
under cover. The dialogue had been most care- 
fully gone over, to have weakened it still more 
would have been to make it ridiculous and also 
faithless in what it purported to illustrate. 

ti$5 

Lillian Burkhart and her company head the bill 
at the Orpheum this week for legitimate and am- 
bitious work. "Captain Suzanne" is a little play- 
let in which Miss Burkhart saves her warrior 
husband's life by donning a hussar's uniform and 
entertaining the Prussian major while her Roger 
escapes. Lillian looks very pretty in the man's 
costume, and at the end of the play engages the 
major in a duel with swords, in which there is 



play is called "Garret Salvation." It calls for act- 
ing of a different sort than that which Miss Burk- 
hart has familiarized us with. There is all of 
pathos and nothing of comedy in the pelce. Its 
strength and the fine presentation that Miss Burk- 
hart and her company will give it, will doubtless 
make the piece acceptable and successful. 

Besides this new piece Miss Burkhart will pro- 
duce for the first time in Los Angeles, a play 
written by herself. "Her Soldier Boy." This play 
will been seen but one night — Thursday. On Fri- 
day night, "A Passing Fancy" will be revived and 
at the Saturday matinee "Capt. Suzanne" will be 
repeated. 

Musical Dale, considered the most expert instru- 
mentalist in the world; Holland and Carrington 
and Gal pen, an operatic trio; Sullivan and Web- 
ber, eastern comedians; Gilbert and Goldie; 
Grapewin and Chance, in a new comedy sketch; 
Sydney Deane, the baritone singer, will make up 
the bill. 



SOME peculiar phases of human nature are 
brought to the top during this oil excite- 
ment, and if the following incident is an in- 
dication of a wide-spread condition, we may safe- 
ly conclude that the petroleum industry has at 
least given us a. new fad. 

It would not do to give the real names of the 
gentlemen concerned, so as a good July substitute 
we will call one of them Wilted and the other 
Fresh. Fresh darted out the door of one of the 
oil exchanges, and, approaching Wilted familiarly, 
said "How do, I believe you're Wilted — my name's 
Fresh — glad to know you; warm day — I'd like to 
talk to you about two minutes on an oil proposi- 



r 




PRESIDENT WILLIAM McKIN LEY. 



more poetry of motion than ferocity; but she kills 
him and lives happily ever after with her husband. 

Chas. E. Grapewin? Hully gee. Well, shay! He 
is a real, live tough, fresh from the Bowery, a 
character that is of international reputation. "In 
Above the Limit" is the name of the sketch he 
puts on with the assistance of Anna Chance and 
Eddie Rourke. 

Van and Norbriga introduce a new sketch this 
week, "Sapho in Rag Time," in which Billy Van 
cuts all kinds of capers and says many funny 
things. 

Sidney Deane is new. He owns an unusually rich 
and clear baritone voice, and sings the old favor- 
ites with success. He is the kind of a man the 
matinee girls will be raving over, and introduces 
more animation into his songs than the general 
run of straight singing acts. 

Jessie Padgham adds to her success every night 
and it is pleasant to chronicle that she is booked 
for the circuit at a nice round salary. Miss Padg- 
ham is fortunate in her selections and in sparkling 
orchestral accompaniment. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart make even a bigger hit than 
last week, and Fluerette and Gardner do the same 
turn with their usual ginger. 

Orpheum 

Lillian Burkhart will begin the last week of 
her season at the Orpheum next week. She has 
played in three pieces since her opening in June, 
and eich of these new plays have met with 
marked approval. Next week this indefatigable 
actress is to stage another brand new play, writ- 
ten by a Los Angeles girl, Marion Short. The 



tion — ground floor — basement in fact — here's a 
sample from a well only ten miles from our land 
— rub some on your hand — smell it — worth four 
dollars a barrel — five hundred barrel well, two 
thousand a day — low capitalization — only small 
block left — let you have it for three cents, thirty 
days — your paper's good — " 

"Hold on here, young man," interrupted Wilted, 
"I don't care anything about all your clatter — 
what color are your certificates?" 

Fresh looked a trifle puzzled at the query, but 
quickly answered, "Um — well, I think they are 
green." 

"That settles your proposition with me. I have 
too many green ones already. I also have brown 
ones, and gold, pink, blue, black, buff and OliVfl 
certificates. Now if you have any yellow ones I 
will take a few to complete my collection." 
,< ,< J» 

Despite Shakespeare's protest that there is no- 
thing in a name, these matters continue to inter- 
est people. One such person has been troubling 
himself about the origin of Kipling and asserts 
that it is a Durham name, although found in York- 
shire. He concludes that it is a contraction of 
Klpperling — ling being an inferior kind of cod, 
sold for 6 cents a pound in Stockton market — 
analagous to the name of Kipling being Dobling, 
or Jopling, jobber in ling, or fishmonger. In that 
case it is only natural that Kipling should be so 
fond of the sea. But how will he like the sugges- 
tion of Kipperling, which the vulgar will interpret 
as "little kipper?" The Rudyard of his name we 
know as due to the fact that he was born on the 
shores of Rudyard lake in Westmoreland. 



GARDEN I NG | 
.^CALIFORNIA I 



§ W.S. I.Y< >NS 

i 



I 



1 




I 



156 PAGES 
H.i.cstka ' I) 

BH BOSSES : : 
PAPBH : : : : 
COVERS : : : 



npIK ONLY WORK 
ever written for this 
soil and climate; entirely 
non-technical and espe- 
cially adapted to amateurs. 
Heretofore sold at 50 CCIUS, 
will be reduced to close 
out an edition to 

2 5 Cents 

and three cents postage. 



GEO. RICE & SONS, Tnc, 

31 1=313 
New High St. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



A Tempting 
Proposition 

TEN-CENT OIL STOCK 

A better one is a $2( 00 Life Insur- 
ance (or a year in the popular 

Order of The Iroquois 

incorporated under the laws of 
the State of New York. For par- 
ticulars and literature send card 
to T. M. CHAPMAN 

2.50 N. Union Ave., L. A. 

«S" Deputies make good pay. 
Several wanted for this territory. 




The 

Summer 
Man 



J is as much of a necessity as the summer 

| girl, and needs a proportionate amount 

% of attention. See our novelty flannel 

% negligee suits, as low as $10.00, and 

i all the fixings that go well with them. 

% % 

LONDON CLOTHING COMPANY f 

£ HARRIS & FRANK, Pkops. 

117-125 North Spring Street i 

&\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\v\\\\\w 



MISS GOODIN 

Florist.. 



440 S. Broadway 



Tel. James 2311 
Res. Tel. Bine 456 

Orders for Cut Flowers 
and all kinds of floral and 
decorative work carefully 
attended to. 



All We Ask is Comparison 

of Goods and Prices 

Ne W Carpets and Rugs 

Suits Hundreds of others and will suit you 

3x7 Shades only 45 Cents 

I. T. MARTIN 




381-3-8 so. 



H'herl Chairs 



il>RINO ST. soldorrtnttA 



Washstand Slahs, Table Tops, Coping, Foot- 
wanners. Hitching Posts. Soapstone and Ser- 
pentine from Catalina Island. 

All kinds of stone and marble work at lowest 
prices. We quarry and manufacture. Whole- 
sale and retail. 



Tel. 36 



BANNING CO. 

222 S. Spring St. 



««««(L»»ftft»*ftftft««ft«ft«**ftAftft«ft»«ftftAft 

NOTICE 

The I .on Angeles City W ter Company will strictly enforce 
the following rule: The hours for shrinking are between (land 
8 o'clock a m. ami f> and 8 o'clock p m For a violation of the 
abivc regulations the water will he shut off, and a fine of 12.00 
will he charged before the water will be turned on again. 



Puritas Root Beer 



The beverage that pleases the palate. The children's especial favorite 

Sif/*^ ICE & COLD STO RAGE CO. Tel. Main 228 
pints 51I.40. — — — — — — ______________ 



3 




FAMILY OF CHINESE CON VKRTS. 

The Boxers have not I n satisfied to vent their wrath against the mission irien and 

othnr forevnera. Native converts are included among tlie objects of their verureanoe. 
Whole families of convi-rts. such as is here pictured, have been murdered, omen and 
childivn being :M ruthlessly treated as men. ThflWIH— Iflfl of other converts have beeu driven 
from their homes in se.irch of safety from the wrath of tlie Boxers. 




In every detail and in all its 
Envionment Ideally 
Californian 



The Most Hagnificent Hotel 
The Most Expansive Landscape 
The Most Varied Forests 
The Most Delightful Temperature 
The Most Superb Flowers 



IN 



ALL 

AMERICA 



One hundred and twenty-six acres of cultivated 
ground, and almost the whole of the Peninsula 
of nonterey for a playground 



Send for illustrated pamphlet to any agent 
or the Southern Pacific Company, 
of for special monthly rates, write 



W. A. JUNKER 



MANAOKK 





JyUR MR. H. C. DILLON has just returned from our McKittrick 
^ well and reports satisfactory progress. The diill will soon be drop- 
ping and our stock will then make another advance. He confirms 
strike of oil on sections 2-32 22, and says the great midway oil field 
between Sunset and McKittrick is being nipidly occupied with der- 
ricks and sure to be a great producer of high grade oil. 



: 
: 



Block of Shares at \2\cts. 



Will Soon be Exhausted 



J. S. DILLON 
H. C. DILLON 



President 
Secretary 



CURRIER BLOCK 

212 West Third Street 



t 
& 



A. R. MAINE5 MFG. CO. 

[J 435 S. Spring St., Los Angeles. 



Orient 
Bicvcles 



SIX HODELS 

•p i? To Choose From 



I 
I 

Fa 



Absolutely the Best Bicycle 
in the Market . . . 



Small Savings Only 



But why not invest them so as 
to make BOO per cent, on 

your investment? When vou 
buy fO shares of stock iu the 



Women's Pacific 

Coast Oil Co. 




OFFICERS 

President, Maty I angley. 
Viee-Pres. . Sarah Tomlinson 
-ec'y-Treas., Douizelle Aldrieh 
Attorney, Elizabeth Kenuey 
H. Ilawgood, M. Inst., C. E., Consulting En- 
gineer. 

DIRECTORS 

Mary Langley Sarah Tomlinson 

Stella Merrltt Marian Ilasson 

Elizabeth Kenney Rose Burcham 
Donizelle Aldrieh. 



At 25 cents per share 

w hen it reaches par, as it will soon lOO r\c*r r^nf 
the profit will be OXf\f per ICIIl. 

Capital Stock $300,000, full paid. non-assessable. Par value Sl.oo. 
330 acres of fine oil land in Kern County Oil District, and owned by the 
Company; fine lease in Newhall District adjoining the fatnons White 
Oil Wells; tine oil property in Nob Hill tract, city, and lease secured of 
some of the finest land in the town of Summerland. where operations 
will begin at once, warrant us in placing our stock on the market at 
25c, in blocks of not less than twenty shares. 

334 Copp Building, 218 S. Broadway 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Phone .John 1 t s 1 



luuiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui 

GEO. R1CB & SONS. (Inc.) LOS ANGELES. 



Illllll 



WESTERN 

GRAPH IC 

<-/In Illustrated Family Weekly of tSe Sovithwest 

WITH WHICH IS CONSOLIDA X B I> T B X LOS A N O E L K 8 BUND A V IOIIiI AND CALIFORNIA C V R I n 

&Vv7Zl fx xv,,, |No.2. Los Angeles, Saturday, July 14, 1900. Price 10 Cents 




A MAGNIFICENT IOSTATE NEAB FRESNO 



WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

otf/i Illustrated Family Weekly of f6c Southwest 

WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED THE 

SUNDAY WORLD and CALIFORNIA CURIO 
0E0. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

ri'HI.IHIKD EVERY SATt'RDAY MORNING AT 

811-818 New High Street Telephone Main 1053 

ENTERED AT THE LOS ANQELSS FOST OFFICE At SECOND-CLASS MATTER 

Sl'FSCRIPT/O.XS—Thiee Pollats a )Va>. or, Twenty-fine cen/l 
a month, collected by Remittance Card system, at! postage paid 
by the publishers. 

COSTRIRUTIONS—We pay cash for accepted contributions, 
those containing photographs for reproduction being most avail- 
able. The usual rules regarding manuscripts should be observed 
to insure consideration. 



15he Editor's Say 

THE question as to who is married and who 
is not is one of absorbing interest just now 
to an astonishing number of people. The 
antipodal opinions of two learned men of the 
bench still leaves room for unlimited argument un- 
til the matter shall have been settled by the de- 
cision of the Supreme Court. Aside from the hair- 
splitting technicalities of the law common sense 
and justice are on the side with Judge Hebbard's 
findings — that a marriage legal in one State must 
be recognized as legal in another. The equity of 
such a view is obvious. There is no injury done 
the State or commonwealth by the immediate 
marriage of a divorced person, nor can it be suc- 
cessfully established that any harm ' accrues to 
either or both the contracting parties through the 
hasty resumption of marital ties. The rebuffs of 
society and the indignation of friends and rela- 
tives are items for individual consideration, in 
which the law has no valid interest beyond the 
mere serving of the law's ends. 

A hypothetical case illustrating the injustice of 
holding a Reno marriage invalid in California 
would be where, innocent of the knowledge that a 
man was a divorcee, a woman should contract mar- 
riage outside the State; and, becoming a resident 
of California In after years, discover that her 
standing was that of a mistress and that her chil- 
dren were illegitimate. If her Reno husband were 
alive and their relations harmonious the remedy 
would be at hand in a second ceremony: but sup- 
posing, farther, that the husband and father had 
died in the interim, leaving property interests only 
in California, the wife and children would be left 
in a sad plight. With no interest in the estate, 
her children's lives irremediably blighted, and 
herself in the position of an outcast, the woman 
would suffer unequaled ignominy to the benefit or 
vindication of no person. 

As in other phases of government where inter- 
state clashes have made it necessary, it seems as 
though the marriage laws will eventually have to 
come under Federal control. Great good has re- 
sulted from the national bankruptcy act, by which 
the rights of individuals are conserved, though the 
interested parties may be separated by the breadth 
of the country. Federal statutes contemplating the 
best features of all the State laws bearing on mar- 
riage and divorce would result in a depreciation 
for hasty marriages and equally hasty separations, 
and work immeasurable good in the upbuilding of 
the institution of the American home, which, es- 
pecially in this western country, is in danger of 
degenerating in appearance at least to a legal con- 
venience. 

It is bad enough for individual users of tele- 
phones to be exasperated to a point of frenzy and 
inconvenienced to the extent of financial loss 
through the miserable service of an institution that 
can be classed as a semi-public utility; but when the 
inefficiency becomes so gross as to threaten the safe- 
ty of the city through fire, there should be a move 
looking toward a remedy. The Herald is authority 
for the statement that two persons tried in vain 
to send in a fire alarm one evening this week by 
telephone. Every minute wasted at such a time 
may mean thousands of dollars loss, and it is time 
for something more than complaints. If the mat- 
ter can he brought to the "official" knowledge of 
the City Council, which has the power tinder the 
charter to lower the rates charged by the telephone 
company, there might be action taken which would 
result in better service. 

It begins to look as if we were at last to have a 
County Hoard of Education without the polit ! cal 
and boodle tentacles that have disgraced previous 
boards. The experience of Ix>s Angeles city and 
county all goes to show conclusively that so long 
as there is patronage connected with an unsalnri' , n' 
office just so long will there be dissatisfaction, if 



not corruption, in the administration of the office. 
A per diem compensation will influence nine men 
out of ten to use every legal excuse to line their 
nests, and if the reorganized board shall conduct 
itself on a high-principled basis it is so much 
more credit to the individual members. 

.< .< 

Whatever may be the ultimate outcome of the 
troubles in China, there is reason for congratula- 
tion that the United States is so strong, both in its 
navy and its army in the Orient. This country 
is so situated that it cannot keep out of any com- 
plications which may arise on the other side o'f 



the Pacific, and the extent of our influence will be 
guaged by our military and naval strength. The 
present crisis is one which may eventuate into a 
war which will decide the fate of the Mongolian 
race, and determine the question of race suprem- 
acy. If civilized nations stand together there can- 
not be any question of the result, but the political 
differences of European nations makes it almost 
impossible that such a union can be maintained. 
Hut happily the position of the United Staets, in 
its impartiality and disinterestedness in such quar- 
rels, occupies a position which will enable it to be- 
come the leading power in the work of uniting 
the white race in such a conflict. China may fall 
to pieces at the first onset, or .t may, by the im- 
mensity of its population, be able to continue the 
fight until other branches of the yellow races are 
drawn into the contest, from racial or religious 
impulses: but in either event, the most critical 



AMONG the many startling and bewildering 
advertisements that one sees in perusing 
the advertising columns of the daily press, 
the following, published last Sunday, will bear 
placing in the front rank: 

PERSONAL — Diana, daughter of the famous as- 
trologer, Dr. Dee; readings for short time only, 
etc. 

Now, as the famous Dr. Dee flourished in the 
time of good Queen Bess, and was presumed to 
have died in 1608, or something like three cen- 
turies ago, the startling question arises, Did he 
really die? or was it a mean, shabby trick that 
this celebrated man of the occult sciences played 
upon his contemporaries, by making believe dead? 
If he really did allow himself to die, like any other 
honest Injun, at the time specified in history, 
then we are brought spang up against the demor- 
alizing and shuddering fact, that we have in our 
midst either a healthy, tangible ghost of long 
standing and of presumably extensive experience, 
or a female so ancient that the "memory of man 
runneth not to the contrary." The bare thought 
that either one of these suppositions can possibly 
be true, is enough to make the cold chills wriggle 
and scoot down the spinal column of the bravest 
Angeleiio. Unless some reasonable explanation can 



time will come when the future policy of civilized 
nations is to be decided, and with the great inter- 
ests which this country has on both sides of the 
Pacific, our influence can be made paramount in 
settling this world-extensive question. 

l* Jt J* 

After several years of tribulations, during which 
only the echoes of the internal wranglings have 
reached the public ear, the future of the Los An- 
geles Herald is at last settled by its appearanc 
Friday morning as a Republican daily, under the 
control of men of money and nerve — requisites for 
successful aggressive journalism. The change is 
an important one. Southern California is left 



without a Democratic organ, and The Times, 
which has enjoyed practically a monopoly of the 
newspaper business of this city, must now divide 
the pie and look pleasant. 

There has been talk for some months that in 
the event of the Herald deal being consummated 
Abbot Kinney and some associates would imme- 
diately launch a true-blue Democratic daily. But 
Mr. Kinney is somewhat of a boomer and it is not 
generally believed that he will plunge into the dif- 
ficulties surrounding the establishment of an- 
other daily, chief of which is the matter of tele- 
graphic news. At this distance from the news 
centers it would be impractical to provide a special 
news service, and the Associated Press is not 
available for a third morning paper. 

The new Herald appears in decidedly better form 
and improved contents. Here's to the Herald, with 
the world before it. 



be given for the presence in our beautiful city of 
this ghost of ancient days, if it be a ghost; or the 
real, simon pure Diana, daughter of "the famous 
Dr. Dee," weighted down by the wrinkles and 
hoarfrosts of three centuries of years, if she be a 
real, simon pure; the Coroner should be requested 
in a gentle, but firm manner, to summon a jury 
of reputable citizens and hold a rigid and search- 
ing inquest to determine her ghostly, or mortal, 
status, and what the dickens she, or it, means by 
invading this peaceful community. 

tj^f 

Another interesting, is not quite so startling, 
advertisement in the same issue is the following: 

"WANTED— Educated man for Mark Antony in 
big local production of 'Julius Caesar;' also man 
for Cassius." 

It will be seen that the advertiser doesn't care 
a continental for voice, figure, histrionic ability, 
training, stage experience, and the other small 
matters of dramatic equipment, heretofore consid- 
ered absolutely necessary and essential by the 
world's renowned — but now effete — managers of 
the past. All the advertiser wants is an "educated 
man." As to the other qualifications, they be 
blowed. What do the people of Los Angeles know 
about Mark Antony, any way? or, for that mat- 



Notebook and Camera. 

N£ ^ Personalities and Happenings n^v^ 




Western Graphic 



s 



ter, where did they ever have a chance to hear of 
old Julius, or even Cassius? They've been dead a 
thousand years, more or less. Truly, we are a 
nervy, audacious people. That is, a few of us. 

Many people will be interested In the portrait 
of Mrs. J. Torrey Connor, the woman who, through 
her popularity and indefatigable hustling, won the 




■ 

MRS. J. TORREY CONNOR 

Express ticket to the Paris Exposition. Mrs. Con- 
nor's name is well known among the reading pub- 
lic, she having contributed largely to the local 
press for several years, and it is not idle anticipa- 
tion to look for some clever letters about gay 
Paree from her pen. Her personality is striking, 
being the very picture of hearty, jolly American 
womanhood. 

t£ 

A San Francisco paper contains the following. 
Can this mean a Paris Commissioner, so called, 
who made his boasts before going to Paris — in 
bar-rooms and elsewhere — that "Varney and I will 
run the Paris Commission and that old man Tru- 
man and the snob Runyon will have nothing to 
say?" and who also boasted that "the Governor 
depended on me to run the thing in Paris as I see 
fit?" and much other low-lived stuff regarding him- 
self and the Governor that we would rather not 
print? Do tell us if this is the person alluded to. 
Well, here is the paragraph: 

An Eastern paper mentions that the "deportment 
of an old Californian during the last Eastern pas- 
sage of the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse was dis- 
graceful in the extreme" and then the paper pro- 
ceeds to say that the old Californian was placed to 
the left of the captain of the steamer, and that 
"even when not in a state of excessive booze" his 
conduct was offensive to all around him. His 
treatment of the Rev. Dr. Talmage was simply 
brutal. The eminent divine had been pressed, 
much against his inclination, to preach, and he 
took for his theme the sacredness of the Bible, 
which the "old californian" proceeded to tear into 
pieces, as he boasted of doing, and grossly offended 
all who heard him. The captain was too much 
mortified to speak about it afterward, except to 
say that it was the most humiliating scene that 
had ever occurred on his steamer. A passenger who 
sat near the captain says that the "old Califor- 
nian's behavior throughout — at the table, in the 
salon, at the drinking and poker rendezvous — was 
coarse, nasty, and generally disgraceful during the 
voyage." Could this fellow have been one of the 
"ole Bills" of our State, which, thank heaven, are 
nearly extinct? 

There is a Presbyterian minister in Los Angeles 
whose vocabulary gets a little rusty between ser- 
mons sometimes, resulting in not a little merri- 
ment among those of his congregation who are 
not deaf to humor, even if it happens to be in a 
pathetic connection. By the way, he is the same 
pious fool who made the remark some time since 
that any young man who took a drink was not 
fit for any ladies company, and was no better than 
a criminal. But to the story: In bringing to bear 
an illustration on some point of his sermon he had 
occasion to refer to his father, electrifying the 
quick-eared of the audience by concluding, "my 
dear father, who lies smouldering in his grave." 

t^jC 

No more delightful of the far away watering 
places can be thought of than the Tavern of Castle 
Crag, the hostelry among the pines of the upper 
Sacramento valley in Shasta county. The excite- 
ment of the most thrilling and enchanting mount- 
ain climbing, the pleasure of absolutely ideal trout 
fishing, and the comforts of a perfectly appointed 
hotel are for those who become guests of the fam- 
ous tavern. In addition one may receive the ben- 
efits of the well-known Shasta medicinal water, 
fresh from the depths of Mother Earth. All South- 
ern Pacific agents are possessed of every detail of 
information which prospective visitors may need. 

The careless attendant who boiled a helpless 



imbecile to death at the insane asylum this week 
is to receive swift punishment for his criminal 
neglect— he is to lose his job at once. It is a sol- 
emn warning to functionaries of public institu- 
tions not to boil the patients to the point of dis- 
solution. 

And now it is discovered that the ordinance pro- 
hibiting Chinese laundryman from working out 
side certain hours has been repealed. Who was 

A Posted 

By Joe 

MY landlord's manner was far from cordial 
when I alighted from the train at Monk- 
ton. He took my grip, and in silence fol- 
lowed me to the hotel. I had not knowingly given 
offense during my last visit, but I knew too well 
it was useless to ask questions. 

The Monktonians had heretofore been friendly 
but now they merely nodded their heads or were 
obvious to my presence. 

The same reticence continued throughout sup- 
per. My landlord thawed a little, for when I 
offered him a cigar, he jerked his thumb over his 
shoulder, and said: 
"Come with me — store." 

We walked in silence. People hurried to and 
fro, taking no notice of my greetings, and even 
ignored my oft-extended hand. 

Curiosity and anger getting the better of me, I 
blurted out: 

"What in the name of" , when I was silenced 

by a warning look. 
I found the store filled with an excited crowd. 



My presence had a quieting effect, for what seemed 
to be a heated argument on my entering, fell to 
the stillness of the grave. It was embarrassing, 
and turning to leave the room, I felt the grip of 
my landlord's restraining hand. 

"Your Honor and gentlemen of the committee," 
he said, "this man ain't no stranger — 'pears like 
your memory's bad — if that's so, git acquainted 
again," and he jerked his thumb at me and then 
at the men. 

Eager to show my appreciation of his confidence 
and gain the good will of the men, I said: 

"Set 'em up, barkeeper; what shall it be, gen- 
tlemen ?" 

I raised my glass as high as I could reach and 
gave the regulation toast, "Monkton and prosper- 
ity." 

Their glasses clinked, and the many hearty slaps 
on my back told me I was winning them over, 
though not a word was spoken. 

I was not a little startled to see the bar-keeper's 
eyes glitter with almost fiendish glee as I passed 
him a silver certificate, none the less so when he 
gave me my change, eight and a half dollars in 
two-cent postage stamps. 

The men took no notice of my indignant, inquir- 



responsible for it? The friends of white labor 
would have willingly "chipped in" to pay the laun- 
dry bill of the meddler. 

jl < * 

In these long days of July, in the year of our 
Lord, nineteen hundred, no one need complain for 
lack of seepage, as the oil men say. In fact, the 
excessive seepage necessitates a change of under- 
clothing at every revolution of the short hand on 
the clock. 



o rv 

B a \j g K e r 

ing looks, but were as dumb as Henry Hudson and 
his ghostly crew. 

I thought of the effect of the damp murky at- 
mosphere on my newly acquired postage, and 
wishing speedily to rid myself of some of it, I 
said: 

"Set 'em up again, barkeeper," and signed to 
my landlord to propose the toast. 

"Monkton and Prosperity!" he shouted, and all 
was quiet again. 

Carefully separating my stamps I placed the ex- 
act amount before the bar-keeper. 

"Wot's them for?" he asked. 

"My treat, you know," I replied in an off-hand 
manner. 

"Them things don't go here, mister," he said, 
grave as an owl. 

"Didn't they went here?" I asked with a faint 
pink smile as I looked in vain for the crowd to 
laugh at my feeble jest. 

Receiving no encouragement, I pocketed my 
postage with my chagrin and passed a note of 



small denomination, and increased to a propor- 
tionally small extent my stock in stamps. 

"Where can I get some small currenoy?" I asked 
timidly. 

"Not in this town, mister," said the Mayor. 

"How about the postmaster?" I ventured. 

"Wouldn't advise you to try it, stranger." 

Throwing caution to the winds, I asked if they 
would buy some of my stamps at a fair discount. 

"Not at 50 cents on the dollar!" they answered. 

I seemed to be living in the "Mysteries of the 
Udolpho," and started to leave the room, when 
again I felt the restraining hand of my friend, who 
mounted a barrel. 

"Your Honor and gentlemen of the committee!" 
he exclaimed. "I have jest told you that my guest 
ain't no stranger. Have you forgotten the interest 
he took in our last conflict? Have you forgotten 
the yell he gave for the schoolhouse? Tell him, 
Your Honor, tell him of our gigantic enterprise, 
on the success of which depends the prosperity of 
Monkton ! " 

"We will confer," said the Mayor, and he beck- 
oned the committee to follow him to the ware- 
room. 



Continued on Page 15 




IN TWO CKNT I'OSTAOK STAMPS 



Competiti 



in 



Western Graphic 



fmSS^^^'^^^^^MW§:*M$^^m^m^SSS^M A Remakably Prophetict Forecast 



MARINE OIL COMPANY 



S. W. KNAPP, 

President and (ien. Mgr. 



OF SUMMERLAND 

Capital $300,000.00 
140,000 In Treasury 



H. D. LOMBARD 

Secretary and Treas. 



Offers subject to previous sale 10,000 shares at 35 cents per share on which price we 
are earning- large returns. 25,000 shares sold between May l~th 
and May 30th. After the present issue of 10,000 shares has been 
taken the price will be advanced. 

We Own 32 Producing Wells and Territory for 60 More 

We are not hunting- for oil, but we have oil in sufficient quantities 
to earn larg-e returns on the present selling price of stock 



Call or send 
for Prospectus 



Marine Oil Company... 



432 Bvrne Building 
Los Angeles 



OFFICERS 

LOUIS 8HIVELY, President 
JOHN O. MILLER, Vice-President, Bakersfield 
E. S. TUTT, General Manager 
A. SHIVELY 



AND DIRECTORS 

I. E. TUTT, Secretary and Treasurer 
TELEPHONE GENERAL JOHNSTONE JONES, Attorney 

JOHN T. C MILLER, Bakersfield 



1601 



Sunset Diamond Oil Company 



Par value of Stock $1 
Present Price 25 cts 



INCORPORATED UNDER THE LAWS OF ARIZONA 

Will begin drilling their first well on section 13 within ZiOO yards of Jewel t & 
Blodgott'a famous gusher, well 17 in the Sunset District. A valuable lease has 
been hecured on to acres in the immediate vicinity of Jewett & Blodtrett's refinery and 
the terminus of the new Sunset Railroad. This insures cheap and easy transportation. 



Make remittance payable to the Secretary. 



Office, 426 Byrne Building 




"Lluie Moneu Works Wonders" { 

The "SUNSET KING" offers to all classes of investors $k 
the greatest fortune-making prospects of the past fifty years. 

Its location, small capitalization, and brilliant leadership jz. 

recommend it to the most conservative investors. jjD 

SUNSET KING OIL 60. 

320-322 Lauohlin Building % 
Sunset JCing Oil Co. - » ■» . - j. * - -v v - r - - - - * ;< y - 

K. H. Dunham, Pres. Fkanklin Refining Co., President 

F. L. Hossack, Secretary. 

Hercules Oil Producing Company ' 

Are now drilling on their Kern River lands; also drilling in the Los 1 
Anpeles field. The Company has valuable oil lands in Coalinga, Kern 
Kiver, Ventura, Newhall and Los Angeles fields. 

REFINERY , 

The Company has begun work on the largest oil refinery on the coast. 
The earning power of this plant will be equal to the value of the prodnc- ' 
tion from several oil wells of 100 barrels capacity each per dav. This 
injures good dividends. •'Hercules" stock is worth owning and is worth ' 
holding as a permanent investment. It will increase rapidly in value. 

Rooms 230-331 Douglas Building, Los Angeles, Cal. - 





fin Absolutely 
_ t Safe Investment 

ft Mine, not a Proved 

~~^B The property consists of the Lost 
ffc- fr ' -■ 9^1 IIorse > ^ ost Horse Extension, and 

'" JKl "-it. E I HW People's Party Claims, each claim 

„ ";.'*- ''■ , * 9H1 being 600 by 1500 feet in area, situated 

'Ci^^JSB&k " *" ' ' B^^H in Riverside County, Cal. 

fljj^H The books of the mine show that 
t about 3000 tons have been mined, and 

milled, with an average result of $27 
per ton. 

SHares now 25 Gents 

Imperial State Mining and Milling Co.'s 10-Stamp Mill 

officers • n • • 

I ^k,."^ 1 :.::: ^ Imperial State Mining and Milling Co. 

0. S. Williams Secretary u 9 

C. H. Schirmer Treasurer Capital $1 ,000,000 -fully paid— non-assessable 

U. S. G. Toed General Manager 

1. r^Z^xor^Zi^^ 605 Lauohlin Building .... Los ftnoeles 



tin the Greater Los Angeles of February 19th, 
1S98, — that journal was the original of Western 
Graphic — appeared the following letter from 
Joseph D. Lynch, written from San Francisco. 
At that time a strong effort was being made to 
displace Mr. Bryan from the leadership of the 
Democracy. Mr. Lynch grasped the sentiment of 
his party with remarkable prescience. The Graphic 
reproduces the article because recent events have 
made it a political curiosity.] 

MR. ARTHUR McEWEN has appeared lately 
in two letters respecting William ,1. Bryan, 
which have been given an extensive pub- 
licity. Without desiring to detract from Mr. Mc- 
Ewen's claims on the recognition of the public, 
any one who dissents from his views may be ex- 
cused for believing that there is nothing in his 
opinions themselves, or in the personal standing of 
the writer, which calls for the exceptional favor 
which has been accorded to both by the Associated 
Press. Tbey derive their importance principally 
from the fact tnat they arraign Mr. Byran per- 
sonally, and are intended to discourage the advo- 
cates of the free coinage of silver on the ratio of 
16 to 1. They differ in no respect from the tirades 
which Republican editors and orators directed 
against the Democratic candidate in the memorable 
campaign of 1896. A great deal of depreciation of 
Mr. Bryan is sought to be balanced by undignified 
inculpation of President McKinley. Mr. McEwen 
represents no large or distinctive element of the 
American people or even of the people of the Pa- 
cific coast. Until lately, this gentleman has fig- 
ured on this side of the continent. Here he has 
been known principally as a headstrong and iras- 
cible man, possessing great skill as a phrasemon- 
ger, and equipped with a power of vituperation 
which shows that Dean Swift imbued succeeding 
generations with a portion of his gall and literary 
ferocity. Mr. McEwen has always had a gala time 
with the victims of his spleen until he has chanced 
to run up against Mr. Ambrose Bierce, or some 
other logomachic champion, when it generally 
turned out that Greek had met Greek, and the re- 
spective friends of the verbal gladiators were 
left disputing as to which was the more accom- 
plished jawsmith of the two. In recondite and 
esoteric involution, convolution and wobblement 
of speech of the Jibbenainousay type, it was gen- 
erally conceded that the doughty and variously ac- 
complished Bierce, who is able to compile a whole 
Volupuk distionary himself without any assistance 
from any quarter of the globe, usually came out 
first best, but in the faculty of not knowing he was 
licked, and of getting in his branding-iron in true 
vacquero fashion, with a rough and "scalp-your- 
foe-and-hang-his-gory-locks-on-your-belt" fashion, 
Mr. Arthur McEwen often extorted the plaudits of 
the spectator. Notwithstanding these frequent ex- 
changes of verbal courtesies, it has never occurred 
to any one on the Pacific Coast, where he is best 
known, to regard Mr. Arthur McEwen as an au- 
thority on politics. From that point of view he 
has been looked upon , as a sort of Ishmaelite, 
whose hand was against everybody, as everybody*s 
hand was against him. His position in California 
and Nevada could not be more accurately stated 
than in the foregoing, if any regard is to be had 
to the truth. Able, but eccentric; a doctrinaire, 
who scattered all over the universe of thought; en- 
dowed with a fund of malignity large enough to 
vivify an Afridis stockade, is a true summary of 
the reputation left by Mr. McEwen when he car- 
ried his pen and person to fresh fields and pas- 
tures green between the Hudson and East rivers. 

Thus far for Mr. Arthur McEwen as he is known 
out here. It is impossible to overstate his imper- 
tinence to Mr. Bryan, or his insignificance as a 
leader of opinion where he is known. Mr. Bryan, 
according to this gentleman, is entirely too small 
a man to lead the Democratic hosts. He is a 
"smart lawyer of the cornfed" west. Mark the 
smug, self-gratulatory insolence of this postulate 
of a phrasemonger who has been allowed, through 
some capricious chance of fate, to bestride the 
continent, as far the Associated Press can bring 
that result about. And all this because our well- 
beloved Arthur has been visited with a "hop and 
ko fetch if change in his views. The whole epi- 
sode recalls to us nothing so much as the old 
anti-climax, 

What ho! Dalgetty, thou great God of War, 
Lieutenant-General to the Earl of Mar. 
McEwen, astride of the continent, and visiting 
judgments with sovereign and potent air of au- 
thority — the ex cathedra idea extended to the ut- 
most scope of any possible prism— is a sight to 
make gods and men laugh, if the former are ever 
supposed to indulge in cachinnation! 

To get down to the gist of the matter, whence 
these McEwenesque tears? The alembic, through 
which the inquiry goes, yields the solution that 
Bryan is not big enough for Democratic leadership, 
because, like ninety-nine out of every hundred of 
the real Democracy, he is still, as he was when he 
was surrounded by the enthusiastic and dauntless 
Democratic hosts of the Presidential campaign of 
1896, in favor of the remonetization of silver at the 
ratio of sixteen to one. What is the matter with 
that issue now? What was the matter with it in 
1896' It is true, as McEwen says, and as every- 
body knew before he said it, that Bryan and the 



Western Graphic 



Bryan Democracy were beaten under that slogan 
in 1896. But it was a victory whose costliness no 
people know better than the intelligent leaders of 
the Republican party. Though, to employ the 
sporting phrase, they "won out," they were scared 
to death in the moment of a victory which would 
not have been theirs if the contest had lasted two 
weeks longer. The Republican leaders, after thev 
had pulled McKinley through, felt as did King 
Pyrhus when he surveyed his decimated legions 
after battle with the Romans, and exclaimed. "One 
more such victory and I am undone." Today they 
are afraid to encounter their opponents of 1896 on 
the same ground. If the election were called to- 
morrow on this identical issue. McKinley, with his 
tergiversation on the silver issue, and his practical 
betrayal of the St. Louis platform, would not figure 
as "deuce aces" in the struggle. 

All honor to Bryan for remaining faithful to 
the issue — that is to say, the main issue on winch 
he was nominated, and which vitalized a memor- 
able campaign. He stays true to the formula of 
sixteen to one because from that constitutionally 
established ratio of the two metals started the most 
remarkable conspiracy against the rights of the 
masses known in the history of mankind. In right- 
ing a wrong there is no wiser course than to get 
back to the point of departure from which the 
wrong started. Every concession to the wrong- 
doer is, to that extent, a condonation of the origi- 
nal iniquity. Bryan is faithful to the ratio of six- 
teen to one between silver and gold because it is 
the old-time honored American ratio, which is in 
consonace with the constitution of the United 
States, and which was established by the govern- 
ment of this country as against the fifteen to one 
ratio of Fiance and of the Latin Union, and as 
against the ratio of any other nation. He wishes to 
get back to that ratio because innumerable steals 
start from it, and can only be rectified by a return 
to first principles. This is probably primarily 
the reason which influences Bryan in his inflexible 
adhesion to the cardinal doctrine of the platform 
on which he was nominated. All honor to him 
for standing where the great majority of the 
American people stand. This is not the place, 
nor would I demand the space, for the multiple ar- 
guments which would establish the fact that the 
ratio of sixteen to one is the right ratio, and 
that interminable fraud and injustice masses can 
only be corrected through its restoration. 

But perhaps the peculiar audacity of Mr. Ar- 
thur McEwen, self-constituted lector of political 
morals as he is, could not be better displayed 
than in the cool insolence with which he assumes 
that, in his devotion to silver remonetization un- 
der proper conditions, Mr. Bryan has overlooked 
any essential Democratic doctrine. We have be- 
fore said that McEwen is a doctrinaire. He prob- 
ably believed that the sun rose and set near points 
which projected shadows of himself or the late 
Henry George on the horizon. Now any Demo- 
crat may be permitted to say that the opinions, 
the vagaries, or the carefully elaborated theories 
of Henry George — admirable as many of them 
may be, and available as some of them may prove 
themselves to be in the politics of the future — 
have at no time formed any part of the dogmas 
of the Democratic party. George and his fol- 
lowers have borrowed from that source far more 
than they can ever hope to return. The Demo- 
cratic party embodies in its repository of political 
truths about every sound proposition ever formu- 
lated for the betterment of mankind. Democrats 
are not bigots. They have not erected any cast 
iron, copper-riveted standards of opinion. They 
have substantially adopted the idea of the old- 
est Christian church, which ran: — "in essentials 
unity, in non-essentials liberty, in all things 
charity." 

The Democratic leader is a fine exemplar of this 
noble principle. Perhaps the breezy self-sufficien- 
cy of Mr. Arthur McEwen has in no respect been 
more conspicuously shown than in his assump- 
tion that William .1. Bryan, in holding steadily to 
his platform of the remonetization of silver at 
sixteen to one, has lost sight of any essential Dem- 
cratic principle. I have studied the leader of the 
true Democracy after the manner in which Saul 
studied Gamaliel. I have sat at his feet when he 
spoke from the rostrum to twenty thousand peo- 
ple. Any man more essentially endowed with the 
burning, living, immortal and never to be over- 
slaughed or extirpated principles of Democracy, 
it has never been my privilege to listen to. On 
all questions of trusts, government by injunction, 
restraint of corporations and maintenance of popu- 
lar rights, he is as true as the needle to the pole. 
Listening to his splendid and patriotic eloquence 
it would require a great effort on the part of any 
fair man to accept the estimate of Bryan so la- 
boriously and so unsuccessfully formulated by Mc- 
Ewen. 

Not big enough for the leadership of the De- 
mocracy of 1900, says this transplanted Pundit, 
McEwen! Fortunately for the masses the man 
who has discovered this fact represents a con- 
stituency of about one on the Pacific Coast; and, 
when the whole country, if the Nebraskan lives, 
shall, with synchronous emphasis, pronounce its 
verdict that Bryan and Bryanism and Democracy 
are one, McEwen and a small and select circle 
will be able to pull themselves together, put on 
a pleasant smile and exclaim, "How we apples 
swim?" 




Under the Derricks 



THE readers of the Western Graphic may 
have noted what to some would appear to 
be optimistic views in regard to the price of 
oil in the future. For some months past the mar- 
ket has been declining and the expression of the 
opinion that this decline would be checked in the 
face of a rapidly increasing production was gener- 
ally looked upon as too hopeful. In other lines of 
trade a declining market and an increasing sup- 
ply would be regarded as forecasting a further 
decline. But the condition of the oil market in 
California is peculiar. In judging of the probable 



tism prevents them from taking such a step with- 
out the assurance that the present conditions will 
continue. It has only been within the past year 
thai the supply on hand and in prospect has grown 
to such volume as to convince them that it is per- 
manent. But now they are convinced of this fact, 
and for several months past the larger users of 
fuel have been in the market trying to make con- 
tracts for oil in quantities sufficient for their use 
running for a series of years. The result Is that 
practically all the visible and prospective supply 
has been contracted for. These contracts have 



Men Who Have Made the Oil Industry 

I --CHARLES VICTOR HALL 



i» 
J» 

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9 

J* 

a» 
j» 
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s» 
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J* 

m 
m 
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J* 

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J* 

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* 




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CHARLES VICTOR HALL lias long been an active business man in Los Angeles, 
came here early in life, and 



He 

most, of the time has been engaged in handling real 
estate. During the boom of 1SS:)-T his operations in this line were large, and at its close 
he owned an extensive tract of land in the south-western part of the city. This he sub- 
divided and for some years has been building bouses upon it and selling them on the 
installment plan. Shortly after oil was discovered in Los Angeles be commenced oil devel- 
opment here and put down several wells which proved to be good producers. His opera- 
tions were confined to the Los Angeles field until about a year ago. when be organized a 
company and began operations in the Fullerton field, where the company now owns one 
of the best properties in that district. Since then his operations have become very exten- 
sive, including many of the oil fields of Los Angeles, Orange. Ventura and Santa Barbara 
counties. The companies now included in the Charles Victor Hall properties are the 
Kullerton Consolidated, the Southern Consolidated, the Arroyo Grande, and the Northern 
Consolidated Xos. 1 and which now const it ut e one of the strongest combinations of oil 
companies under one management in Southern California. Personally he is a gentleman 
with many estimable traits of character, and is very popular among bis business and 
social associates. 



« 

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condition of the market the future demand for the 
product must be taken into consideration, and this 
demand is almost wholly contingent upon the abil- 
ity of producers to increase production. This ap- 
parent contradiction is explained by the fact that 
manufacturers and other heavy users of oil are 
now convinced of the cheapness and utility of oil 
as a power producer, and their only hesitancy 
about its use is the fear that they have hereto- 
fore entertained in reference to the certainty of 
the supply being abundant enough to insure a sup- 
ply sufficient for their use for a term of years. 
Business men are too clear-headed to continue 
using coal at a loss, but their natural conserva- 



been made mostly with the large producers, and 
the result has been that those who use oil in small 
quantities find that they have to bid up in price 
in order to obtain a supply. This is the reason 
why the price recently jumped from 11.05 to $1.25 
per barrel, with the prospect of a still further ad- 
vance. 

«t < .< 

The market being bear of oil and the demand 
rapidly increasing, no matter how much the pro- 
duction may be enlarged there will be no glut for 
a long time to come. A few months ago It was 
calculated by men engaged in the purchase of oil 
for shipment or storage that until well into the 



6 



Western Graphic 



coming year the supply would gain on the de- 
mand, and that Dy early winter all the storage ca- 
pacity in Los Angeles would be full. They under- 
estimated the demand and discounted too largely 
on the increase of the supply, for now the output 
is being shipped directly from the well to such an 
extent that the tankage is not as full as it was. 
One of the immediate causes of this is the large 
increase in the demand from the railroads. The 
Southern 1 acific is reported to have recently con- 
tracted for an increased supply of 15,000 barrels 
per month, and the Santa Fe is making contracts 
to meet an expected increased demand of 30,000 
barrels per month consequent upon the entire dis- 
continuance of coal on their lines in California. 
New contracts with San t rancisco parties will re- 
quire 130,000 barrels of oil within the next 
eight months. The Union Oil Company has con- 
tracted to deliver a like amount in excess of its 
usual shipment to San Francisco before the year 
closes. This means an increased demand of about 
400.000 barrels by the close of the year. 
It is true that the building of railroads to the 



Horace S. Cutter 



Edward D. Silent 



I Ed. D. Silent & Co. 

* ESTABLISHED IN 18S5 

jfc MEMBERS 

1 LOS ANGELES OIL EXCHANGE 

* CALIFORNIA OIL EXCHANGE 

X BUY AND SELL 

I Oil Stocks Strictly on Commission | 

<t OFFICE V 

t 216 West Second street Tel. Main 695 $ 

w 



The only way to purchase Oil Stocks 
is through some disinterested 
Capable Broker m 



WE 



Deal in Oil Stocks Exclusively 
Are thoroughly posted .... 



Dickinson & Bush 



OIL STOCK BROKERS 

Wilcox Building 



v ii if tti it it it iii it & a a m m m nm it it m m a it >t< & it »<< »i< >*< »i< >«< »»< * 

1 Kern River Oil I 

I and Development Co. 



r 

I 

| 201 Laughlin Bldg. 212 Sansome St. r 

^ Los Angeles San Francisco 

^ Own outright 320 acres in Kern District, 

-a Lease outright on 100 acres in Fullerton Dis- fr 

* trict, near big producing wells. ^ 

\ 250,000 shares, $1.00 each 100,000 shares in \ 

•3 treasury. Non-assessable. 

20 Cents a Share 

-i r 

if m if\ if\ »|\ »|\ <i> ^ > m m n\ it< n > f« nv t» W «i» m •» » i> *» i» <i> n m n »n m *< <t 



C. W. SMITH, President 



F. C. MELTON, Secretary 



H. O. HAINES, Treasurer 



m jvleviy <?eptury Oil <?o. 

Has a total of 38f>3 acres o( the choicest Oil Lands, situated 
in the very heart of the known and proven best producing 
districts. This Company will also manufacture, under U. !S. 
patent 439,745, 

Gasoline, Kerosene, Sewing Machine Oil, 
Bicycle Oil, Engine Oil, Cylinder Oil 
and Asphaltum 

Samples of all these can be seen at the Company's office. 
Subscriptions for stock will be received from 10 a.m. to 5 p m 
SHrtRbS * 1 .OO E«CH 



NEW CENTURY OIL COMPANY 

Telephone GREEN 564 1 08-1 0°-l 10 Stimson Blk. 

vfc it *fc ii 0> it \tt it * it it A it u> ifc tli \tt \ti vIj \lt \i> \ii vfc \fc \t> \it \* \fc ifc Ji \k vli t- 

I 323 Acres in Soquel Canyon £ 

% Low Capitalization No Salaries * 

% No Debts No Assessments % 

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LIBERTY OIL CO. 

I Rooms 201-220, 202^ S. Broadway | 

* t- 
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Kern river and Sunset field will release a large 
amount of oil from wells in those fields which are 
now capped and will throw it upbn the market, 
but however this may be, it will no more than 
keep up with the demand for a short time, and 
would be insufficient to make the storage in San 
Francisco large enough to induce all the manufac- 
turers to make the change from coal to oil. 
J* J* 

It may seem ungracious to criticize the Chamber 
of Commerce for lack of enterprise in any re- 
spect. Its work for the upbuilding of Southern 
California has heretofore been so persistent and 
effectual that it is entitled to the gratitude of 
every citizen. But for some reason this activity 
has not been exerted very strongly in the building 
up of the oil industry. It is true that some inci- 
dental commendation has been given, but not to 
the extent which the magnitude of the interests 
involved demand. It is now the largest and most 
promising industry in California and the people 
of Los Angeles and other portions of the South 
should work together in the dissemination of in- 
formation in regard to its extent. It would be 
well for the Chamber of Commerce to take the 
lead in having a petroleum exhibit sent to the 
Paris Exposition, and in all the literature sent out. 
and exhibits made of Southern California products 
the fact should be emphasized that the largest de- 
posits of petroleum are to be found here. Already 
an association has been formed in San Francisco, 
the purpose of which is to convince people in the 
East and in Europe that the bay city is the com- 
mercial center of the petroleum fields of Califor- 
nia, and it behooves Los Angeles to be at least 
as energetic in meeting this rank heresy with ex- 
hibits and literature showing that the natural 
home of the derrick is in Los Angeles and that 
this city is the center around which the petroleum 
industry revolves. These are suggestions Frank 
Wiggins should ruminate on, unless he is too busy 
promoting some oil company. 

The decision of Judge Ross in a case wherein 
an injunction was asked to restrain a party who 
had located a placer oil claim upon land upon 
which lieu script had previously been located is 
one of great importance to oil men in some por- 
tions of Central and Southern California. ll< de- 
cides that the script location will hold. By this 
decision quite a number of locations in the Kern 
river field will change hands, many of them being 
among the most valuable oil lands in that field. 

Jt 

This decision may also have an effect upon some 
placer locations which have been placed upon a 
number of homestead tracts where the rights of 
the homesteaders to a patent had not yet accrued. 
Following the same line of argument as laid down 
by Judge Ross it would seem that such placer 
claims would not be valid against a homesteader 
where he had only partially completed the five 
years' residence required. This being so the home- 
steader would be entitled to an injunction re- 
straining placer claimers from doing assessment 
work upon the land. 

<J* -."* 

There is some talk about a union of the two oil 
exchanges. Such a result of the bickerings of the 
two bodies would be a great relief to oil men, for 
the present bear raid upon stocks has arisen more 
from the jealousies engendered by rival brokers 
than from any foundation for depressing prices. 
The prospects and financial standing of most oil 
companies are now better than they have ever 
been, and the exchanges have done much injury 
to legitimate oil development in their attempts to 
raid stocks of rival brokers to settle imaginary 
scores. If this unbusiness rivalry is kept up the 
result will be the same as it was in San Francisco, 
where the business of both organizations has gone 
to pieces. No exchange at all would be far better 
than to have the present conditions continued. A 
little while ago all the leading producers were reg- 
ular attendants at exchange meetings, but now the 
business of both organizations seems to have fall- 
en into the hands of men who have but little in- 
terest in oil development. Their sole purpose 



seems to be to make a little money out of margins, 
without regard to the effect upon the industry. 

t($8 

Those oil men who have kept out of placer oil 
claims are now congratulating themselves. The de- 
cision of Judge Ross in the "scripers" cases has 
unsettled titles, or rather settled them adversely 
to the way most of the oil men desired, and now 
this aversion will be more pronounced than ever. 
Of course it is possible to obtain a clear title under 
such claims, but the road thereto is beset with so 
many uncertainties that many are now requiring 
titles based upon patents or Spanish grants before 
they will begin oil development. The dangers are 
so numerous that the utmost caution is necessary. 
Clouds may arise in many unexpected ways. There 
has been so much competition in making such 
claims that in many instances adverse claims have 
been filed upon the same land, and even where this 
is not the case there has been so much careless- 
ness in making filings that generally the only way 
a title may be perfected is through the courts. 
The seriper difficulty is now passing away, for the 
amount of unlocated scrip is not large, but even 
here the cloud of litigation still towers, the un- 
scrupulous methods used in making locations hav- 
ing made everything short of a patent unsafe. Many 
of these locations have been made upon homestead- 
ed land where the patent has not been secured, 
many upon the seashore, where only the in- 
cohoate right to drill below tide is acquired, and 
even this is contingent upon the consent of the 
government, and in still others, where apparently 
all the provisions of the law have been met, the 
spectre of litigation hovers. The only safe course 
for oil men to take is to require a perfect title be- 
fore expending money upon land. 

fc?^ 

And in taking leases where the title rests upon 
a firm basis the same care should be exercised in 
regard to mortgages that would be regarded as 
necessary in the purchase of the land. The con- 
sent of the mortgagor is requisite, as his release 
will be required in all matters affecting the land 
while the mortgage is in force. The great care- 
lessness so often shown in such matters promise 
that the lawyers will often make more money out 
of oil land than the men who furnish the money 
for development. The best way is to pay these 
professional gentlemen moderate fees when the 
leases are taken rather than to give them the 
larger moiety of the profiis to straighten out these 
legal tangles in after years. 

Money and Tre^de 

THE present Presidential campaign is re- 
markable for the fact that business has not 
been affected on account of it. For the past 
thirty years business men have been compelled to 
take in sail every Presidential year because of the 
threatened radical change in monetary and indus- 
trial conditions and policies. The exemption 
which business is now having in this respect is 
very fortunate for the country, for were the same 
menace to business present as have heretofore at- 
tended Presidential campaigns, even the present 
prosperous business conditions would be seriously 
affected. The most reasonable explanation of this 
seems to be that people do not believe any change 
in the national administration will take place. 

(,$8 

A year ago at the present time there was general 
apprehension throughout Southern California that 
the fruit trees would be seriously affected for the 
lack of water before the rains came. This year, 
although the supply of moisture last winter was 
but little in excess of a year before, there is no 
such apprehension, and all kinds of crops are 
looking much better than in 1899. The reason for 
this is that there has been so much water develop- 
ment going on that the supply is much in excess 
of last year, and in addition to this, much more 
rain fell in the mountains than one year ago. The 
country is passing through the summer in ex- 
cellent shape and with a reasonable amount of 
rain next winter the effect of the drought will be 
entirely effaced next year. 




Music and Art 

Criticism and Comment ^» T5he Doings of Artistic Folk 




IT isn't always the person who knows most of 
the science of music who is to be credited with 
the best taste in musical matters. It is a great 
mistake to confound knowledge with culture. 
Gaining a taste in art is very much like the pro- 
verbial pursuit of happiness. We are always pur- 
suing that elusive something, but how many of us 
actually achieve our desires in that direction or can 
approach a tangible result as the outcome of the 
chase? The art world is full of illustrations of the 
pursuit; poets, painters, composers have in tones, 
words and colors endeavored to show how vain is 
this striving after the nearly unattainable. You 
can easily cram your brain with facts garnered 
from every handy field, you may be a walking en- 
cyclopaedia of matters in which you are interested, 
be they artistic or scientific; but the attainment of 
that peculiarly elusive something which we call 
culture is beyond the reach of those who aim sim- 



ply to fill their minds with an assortment of facts 
on which to draw when the occasion demands. 
There are many earnest students in the depart- 
ment of art who strive industriously and ardu- 
ously to acquire that polish, refinment and discern- 
ment which will enable them to appreciate the 
aesthetics of the art, but the majority of these 
succeed in securing knowledge, but not culture. 
The value of the knowledge gained by the tedious 
process of study and experience lies in the fact that 
it is merely crude ore that has to be passed 
through the furnace; the refined product of melt- 
ing and assimilation is that fine feeling and taste 
which is the possession of the man of culture. As 
in the Garden of Eden, "the tree of knowledge is 
not the tree of life." Knowledge is necessary for 
culture, it is not conceivable that an ignorant per- 
son can be cultured. The brain must be refined, 
rasped down by experience, fined by the absorp- 



Western Graphic 



7 



tion of the food on which it builds its fibre. As 
Mr. Apthorp has properly and aptly said: "Cult- 
ure is, in the end, a matter of feeling and trained 
instinct; never purely a matter of thought. It is 
a matter of perception." The acquisition of a fine 
taste in music as in other of the Arts is very 
much as it is in that social condition or class 
which we designate society. Those who live in the 
world and in good company, are quicksighted in 
discerning every defect or irregularity in behavior; 
the very slightest singularity in motion, in speech, 
or in dress, which to one beyond the pale would 
be invisible, does not escape observation. The 
most minute differences in the human counte- 
nance, so minute as to be far beyond the reach of 
words, are distinctly perceived by the plainest per- 
son; while, at the same time, the generality have 
very little discernment in the faces of other ani- 
mals to which they are less accustomed; sheep, for 
example, appear to have all the same face except 
to the shepherd, who knows every individual in 
his flock as he does his relations and his neigh- 
bors. The difficulty of distinguishing individual 
Chinese until one becomes accustomed to the finer 
differences or facial characteristics, is also an illus- 
tration of how necessary experience is in the mat- 
ter of discernment, and the power of discrimina- 
tion which experience and knowledge gives. The 
people of Athens were critics in language, in pro- 
nunciation and even in eloquence, harangues being 
their daily entertainment. In Rome the most il- 
literate shopkeeper is a better judge of statues and 
of pictures than persons of refined education else- 
where. These facts are convincing that a discern- 
ing taste depends more on experience than on na- 
ture. But these facts, however, serve to open to 
us a sure method of improving our taste in the 
fine arts; which, with those who have leisure for 
improvement, ought to be a powerful incitement to 
cultivate a taste in these arts; an occupation that 
cannot fail to embellish their manners and to 
"sweeten society." This matter of taste is far- 
reaching. Taste, whether it be natural or ac- 
quired, must be improved by education, reflection 
and experience; it must be preserved in vigor by 
living regularly, by using the goods of fortune 
with moderation and by following the dictates of 
improved nature, which give welcome to every ra- 
tional pleasure without indulging any excess. The 
most insidious foe to a proper and sane art devel- 
opment is an "art-formula." Zola, it was, who 
said that a formula is but an instrument from 
which the predestined man can draw most eloquent 
music. But a formula serves only as an aid; the 
composer builds his works upon a form, and the 
cognizant hearer treats this form as a framework 
upon which a plant has been built and trained. 
In the latter his individuality and genius show di- 
vergences from what others have done before him. 
But this framework, while it bears on the intel- 
lect, has little to do with feeling and instinct. It 
is a piece of knowledge, that is all. 

The various schools of music fight over these 
things, but what does that signify? Wagner 
laughs at Donizetti; he holds that his character 
in a drama shall sing instead of speaking, but 
there are as many people of good taste who ad- 
mire the Italian composer as there are followers 
of the Master of Bayreuth. i oese contentions are 
not based on an accurate appreciation of the 
artistic character and quality of Wagner's music- 




■pRAl'TICK of many hours daily, a test 
under which many instruments give way, 
has no appreciable effect on the 
KIHBALL PIANO 

After years of this kind of usage its tone 
will be as sweet, strong and clear as on the 
day it was first used. 

It does not take a trained car to detect 
beauty of tone in the Kimball. It is appar- 
ent to everyone It satisfies the critical 
tastes of thousands. .. 



SOLE AGENCY 



The Bartlett Music Co, 

233-2^ S. Broadway 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



dramas or Donizetti's operas. The man or woman 
of strong convictions is quite likely to err in an 
ethical way; to be stern in giving an enormous 
value to a notion. Good taste is essentially 
catholic, a liberality of thought and striving is 
abEDlntBly necessary in reaching a high point of 
artistic culture. The rag-time tunes of the day, 
where 'they properly represent the out-pouring 
of the oppressed slave heart, such tunes as "Sweet 
Marie" that are echoes of the only music that we 
can in any way claim as national — that of the 
Creoles, are within the scope of those who are 
striving for the best taste. The vogue which the 
latter-day and fictitious "negro music" enjoys is 




MISS F.DITII BOND, HARP 

a mere indication of ignorance on the part of an 
unmoral — not immoral — public. "The true aim of 
artistic culture is to train the instincts, not to 
eradicate them; to heighten their activity, not to 
block it." 

Counterfeit coin often passes current a long time 
before its true quality is discovered. So it hap- 
pens, too, in the case of people who, curiously 
enough, in their sweet simplicity are parading un- 
digested ignorance, a loginess of absorbed knowl- 
edge, for the thorough mental assimilation of that 
knowledge, and its transmutation into a quick 
perceptive faculty, which is the true culture. A 
study, wide, thorough and comprehensive, of the 
great works of the masters of the tone-world; not 
only in books and in the score, but from the plat- 
form as voiced in the interpretation of the best 
conductors; the gradual understanding and assimi- 
lation of the best in each, with a just discrimina- 
tion and patient sifting of that which is of highest 
purpose and aspiration in all these works, with no 
hard and fast preference for any "one in particular 
until the judgment is formed to the point of 
honest balancing of the points of appreciation and 
the traits of highest value; a catholic liberality 
which looks for good in everything, and with an 
optimistic forbearance for human shortcomings; 
the work of the bee, taking, however, the perfume 
with the honey; all this is necessary for him who 
would honestly aim to reach that gratifying and 
joyful pinnacle which will enable him to claim 
fairly that he is a person of the best culture. 

E. F. KUBEL. 

,< 

At last we can claim Herr Arnold Krauss as 
one of us — congenially, sympathetically and polit- 
ically — for on Tuesday of this week, in the solemn 
presence of Superior Judge Allen, he renounced the 
King of Roumania and swore allegiance to the 
stars and stripes, which he could probably also 
play in sixteen different keys. Having become an 
American he left Friday for Catalina, where he 
will enjoy a much-needed rest. The application 
of "having become an American" lies in the fact 
that Mrs. Krauss did not accompany him on his 
vacation jaunt to frisky Avalon, and ere long we 
may expect to hear the dear summer girls from 
the bewitching isle of the I'acific whispering among 
themselves "Arnold — and to think he was mar- 
ried." 

An excellent program has been prepared for the 
musieale to be given July 24 at Blancliard Hall, 
under the auspices of the Castro Select Academy of 
Languages for the benefit of the famine sufferers 
of India Mr. Blancliard has contributed the hall 
and some.of the best local talent have donated 
their services for the evening, including the Mex- 
ican Independent Band, Joseph Scott, C. S. De- 
lano's Guitar, Banjo and Mandolin Club, Mrs. 



MUSIC AND ART ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 

VOICK 

COMPOSITION 
THEORY 



Ihone Main 88ft 



230 HKl.I.MAN BLOCK 



ARNOLD 



KRAUSS 



SOLOIST AND VIOI.IX TKACHKK 

Pupil ot Cesar Thomson 
Studio: 807 W. Seventh at. Tel. Green 1558 

MISS JENNIE WINSTON 

SOPRANO 

Concerts and Recitals. Vocal Instruction. 

Pupil of .Madame Roeewald, San Francisco; F. H. Tubbs, New 
York; Anna Miller Wood, Boston, and (ieo. Sweet, New York. 

Studio, Rooms 812-818 Blancliard Building. 
Residence, 1372 S. Flower St.; Kes. Tel. Blue 3682. 



HARLEY 



HAMILTON 

CONCERT VIOLINIST ANI> TEACHER 

Ensemble playing a specialty. 
Musical Director l,os A ngeles Theatre. 
Pupil of Emile Sauret, London, and Simouelti, London. 

Studio, 820-823 Blauchard Building 



CHARLES 



E D S O N 



BASSO CANTANTK 

Engagements Accepted for 

Concert, okatorio Studio 
and Opera ... 611 WITMKR STREET 

Telephone James 78 



MORTON F. MASON 

Teacher of Piano, Organ and Harmony 

Organist Pasadena Presbyterian Church 
Studio: Blancliard building Residence: 250 State Street 

Los Angeles Pasadena 



MISS MIRIAM B. BARNES 

Piano Soloist and Teaeher of the Piano 
Pupil of 

Herr Thilo B ecker 253 SOUTH GRAND AVE . 

CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

HARMONY COUNTKKPOINT 
COMPOSITION VIOLIN 

Studio Tajo Block, cor. 1st A Brd'y Residence 632 Burlington 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

TKACHKK OF THE HAKT 

Address care of So. Cal. Music Co. RESIDENCE: 
216 W. Third st., Los Angeles Lincoln Park 



MADAME MARIE HUNI 

TEACHKIl OF SINGING 

Classical Music a Specialty. 
Studio, 628 S. Hill Street Los Angeles 

D. EL MORRISON 

VOICK BUILDING 

77 and 78 Potomac Block Los Angeles, Cal. 



MISS MAUDE PRIEST 

GUITAR LKSSONS 
Specialties — Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Pupil M. S. Arevalo STUDIO: 452% So: Broadway 

Room 25 



A. 



WILLHARTITZ 



Piano, Harmony, C posil Etc. 

Los ANOELES 311 BLANCHARD MUSIC AND ART BLDG. 



EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAB 

STUDIO— 314 Blauchard Music Hall 
Mornings at Pasadena Directoi Throop Institute 

Afternoons at Los Angeles Mandolin and Guitar Club 



ROLLA E. GARDNER 

ICAN.IO. MANDOLIN, GUITAR 

String Orchestra Si uiuo, 244 South Hill Bl 



BiaiiGliard Hall 



223 S. Broadway 

Opp. City Hall 

Building devoted to Music and Art. 

Auditorium, seating 800, can be engaged for Muslc- 
alcs. Receptions, Lectures, Dances, eiu. 

Itehcarsal anil Lecture Rooms for rent. 

Forty Studios— single and en suite. 

Public Art Gallery open daily, 1 to 4 p. m. 
For any Information apply to 

F. W. BLANCHARD 



LADIES f 

Have your Freckles Removed " 

Original Freckle Salve f 



By Using the 



PREPARED ONLY BY 

C. F". HEINZE/WAIN 

Sag North CH KM 1ST 

Main str«et Vr*»> Price OO cts. S 



Furs stored, made to order and remodeled. 
D. Honoff, 217 Broadway, <>pp City Ila 



Western Graphic 
To 'Frisco by tKe Sarvt^. Fe 

MAI ER & ZOBELElNi oC6e Consummation of Many Hopes 



Joseph Maier George Zobelei.n 

Pres. and Treos. Vlce-Pres. and 8ec'y 

HOME INDUSTRY KEEP MONEY AT HOME 




BREWERY.. 



t Incorporated 

444 ALISO STREET 

TEL. Ml. 01. Los Angeles, Cal. 



BROKE 

ON A GIRL 

A Wave at Coronado Beach 



It only costs 94.00 for Un- 
round trip to get there. 
Tent City is the attraction. 
Music. Dancing, Bathing, 
Boating and Pishing, 



Santa Fe Ticket Office 

Second and Spring Sts. 



W "^B* "W — ' ' -W -^P^ 

\ Hammam Turkish 

; Russian or Baths 5Qc 



J 210 South Broadway 
^ Los Angeles.... 

J Tel. Green 427 



Open Day 
and Night 



-3» 51 -jW *cm 3gW ^» 



ft 



• • • « the Paper in this Publication is 
"Bait tone Hook," furnished by « « « « 

Blake, moffitt * Cowne 



* * * * 



Paper Dealers 



« « « « 



Paper • of « all « Descriptions 



Cos Angeles 



California 



H ?6 ?6 S6 16 l« ?6 18 



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ON Saturday morning, the 30th of June, the 
first through passenger train from Chicago 
to San Francisco, reached Point Richmond, 
San Francisco Bay, having made the entire ruta 
from east to west, over the new lines of the Santa 
Fe system. The new division from Stockton to 
San Francisco is completed, the terminals are 
finished, the ferries are in full operation and the 
Santa Fe is at last in San Francisco. 

Ever since the Santa Fe's lines reached Los An- 
geles, business men have wished that it might 
gain the point it has now attained. Ever since 
the first rumor became circulated throughout the 
San Joaquin valley, that its lines might possibly 
extend there, it has been longed for, and now that 



a simple one. The trains of the Santa Fe have to 
pass over the tracks of the Southern Pacific from 
Mojave to Bakersfield, in order to cross the Te- 
haobap] mountains. What the terms of the Santa 
Fe's lease for the use of this 68 miles of track may 
be, no one but the officials of the two roads know. 
Until it has its own tracks covering the entire 
distance, the Santa Fe cannot dictate terms for lo- 
cal passenger travel over portion's of the S. P. 
tracks. As soon as its own line is reached at 
Bakersfield, however, it is upon its own property. 
Another class of growlers are small business men 
who get a box of goods by freight from time to 
time and who ignorantly imagined that as soon as 
the Santa Fe got into San Francisco, it would im- 




Photo by VV. J, Rouse 



DEPOT AT HAN FORD ON SANTA FE NEW LINE 



its through trains are running, there is a stimu- 
lated business activity throughout the south half 
of the State, that may be attributed directly to it. 
The completion of this new line marks an epoch 
in the business history of the State, that is second 
in importance to no other one achievement that 
has been accomplished in the past quarter of a cen- 
tury. With two transcontinental lines open for 
business, almost the entire territory of the Pacific 
Coast is radically benefited and to assure one's 
self that these benefits are appreciated, one has but 
to talk with business men all along the line. 

In order to describe the new road, the towns and 
cities through which it passes, its depots and other 
buildings, the conditions that prevail in the coun- 



mediately annihilate all existing freight rates and 
everything would take a tumble. The Interstate 
Commerce law is still in effect, and if it were not, 
it is not the sole aim of the Santa Fe to fight 
the S. P. They are here for a share of the busi- 
ness and by courteous treatment, fair charges and 
prompt service, believe they will get it. Those 
who looked for a cut-throat rate war will be disap- 
pointed, 

The ride from Bos Angeles to Bakersfield is too 
well known to need further description here. The 
famous "Loop" is an example of railroad engineer- 
ing well worth going a long way to see. At 
Bakersfield the tourist takes his seat in a north- 
bound Santa Fe train, over what has heretofore 




p hoto by W, J. Rouse 



SANTA EE WAREHOUSE AND YARDS, SAN FRANCISCO 



AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA 



try tributary to it, I made a trip a few days ago, 
over its entire lines in this State. Before describ- 
ing the things I saw, however, it may be as well 
to refer to one or two unbusinesslike complaints 
that have been heard here and there about the 
new road and its plans. There are those in Los 
Angeles who shied very badly when the Southern 
Pacific road put its limited passenger rate to San 
Francisco from Los Angeles, up to $15. What the 
company's reason for this was, they only can ex- 
plain if they see fit, but the complaining ones won- 
der why the Santa Fe doesn't immediately make a 
lower rate for the same business. The reason is 



been known as the San Francisco and San Joaquin 
Valley road. At Bakersfield the Santa Fe have 
erected one of their best type of depots. The 
building is a careful copy of the modified mission 
style of architecture. Its pretty facade of sym- 
metrical arches and pillars, its white walls, its 
shady verandahs and its bright roof of red tiles 
combine to form a picture of restfulness and beau- 
ty, seldom seen about railroad property. Along 
the sunny side of the pretty structure, reaching its 
entire length, is a superb garden of tropic and 
semi-tropic plants and flowers. At all of the sta- 
tions, large and small, throughout the entire lines, 



Western Graphic 



9 



these pretty gardens are found. They are the crea- 
tions of Mr. J. Reimers of Stockton, a landscape 
gardener of more than local reputation. 

Passenger traffic is now being regularly handled 
between San Francisco and the East, and the same 
fine equipment of roadbed, Pullman palace and 
tourist sleeping cars, chair and dining cars, that 
characterizes the Santa Pe is in evidence. 

For fiften or eighteen miles north from Bakers- 
field, the effect of irrigation may be seen, upon 
what would otherwise be desert land. A great 
water company at the place named has reclaimed 
thousands of acres of rich land, upon which al- 
falfa, wheat, fruits of all kinds, as well as vege- 



the busiest city I found on the entire trip, and as 
long as they are all making money they don't 
worry about the condition of the streets. Maybe 
some day they'll clean 'em. The Santa Fe has 
built a magnificent depot here and in addition a 
substantial freight house of brick, both of the mis- 
sion style. 

From a few miles north of Fresno, all the way 
to Stockton, the great grain fields of the State are 
seen. For almost a hundred miles, or from 
I.ankershim to Stockton, the train runs through 
endless fields of wheat, that stretch away toward 
the coast range on the West and toward the Sier- 
ra Nevadas on the Fast, as far as the eye can 




Photo by W. J. Rouse SANTA FE FREIGHT DOCKS FOOT OF SPEAR STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



tables are raised in plenty. But after passing this 
land and a comparatively narrow strip of artesian 
land which affords excellent grazing, the tracks 
run through what was once a portion of the Tulare 
lake bed. Not even a jack rabbit will stay there 
now. It is hotter than Tophet and the only di- 
version by way of scenery for 60 or 70 miles, is 
the unceasing array of whirlwinds of alkali dust, 
far away across the level waste. Beautiful mirages 
are seen under certain conditions, but these are not 
of lasting interest. At Corcoran Junction the 
branch line to Tulare, Visalia, Reedley and Del 
Rey leaves the main line, to rejoin it again at 
Fresno. Soon after leaving the junction the first 
of the great peach orchards of this section are 
seen at a station named Banner. Vineyards of 
tremendous extent also appear and when the little 
station of Laton, on the Laguna de Tache grant is 
reached, the King river is crossed and the train 
runs for miles through magnificent groves of live 
oak and cottonwood trees, that stretch away to- 
ward the east as far as the eye can reach. This 
same sort of country extends out and beyond Tu- 
lare and Visalia, both of which are favorably lo- 
cated, Visalia being a particularly beautiful town. 
Hanford, one of the best watered sections in this 
portion of the country is a progressive little city 
with public buildings and business blocks, some of 
which would be a credit to Spring street in Los 
Angeles. 

As the train nears Fresno, the great vineyards 
of Fresno county appear. It is a marvel to the 
uninitiated, how such vast expanses of land can be 
so well and perfectly cared for, how the tremen- 
dous crops can be gathered and dried and how it 
can be possible for the workmen in the fields to 
keep pace with the ripening of the grapes, which 
have to be handled so carefully and so promptly. 
But Fresno is the center of the raisin industry and 
the growers there understand the details of the 
business to perfection. The peach, nectarine and 
apricot orchards are seen upon every hand, and 
beyond them a few miles, fields of wheat and other 
grain almost limitless in extent. 

Fresno is the most important city between San 
Francisco and Los Angeles, in the matter of agri- 
cultural and horticultural pursuits, while Stockton 
holds the same place, with regard to manufactur- 
ing. Fresno has fine public buildings, a magnifi- 
cent court house, an excellent fire department, 
good schools, fine canneries, fifteen fruit packing 
firms and the dirtiest streets in the State. The 
streets are said to be paved with asphalt, some- 
where down under the dirt, but as the street de- 
partment hasn't had any money since last October, 
they have not been exhumed recently to ascertain 
whether or not the paving is still there. Fresno is 



reach. On the night of the 9th of May there was 
an unprecedented fall of rain throughout, this sec- 
tion, almost two and an eighth inches falling in 
two hours. This has damaged these immense 
wheat fields somewhat by rust, but notwithstand- 
ing this the yield will be heavier than in 1899. 
This does not mean, however, that the grain crop 
of the San Joaquin valley will be a good crop, as 
reckoned for averag3 years, but it will be better 
than the best crop of a dry year yet gathered. 

As delightful a railroad picture as one can look 
upon is displayed from the car windows in the 
vicinity of Merced. This is the Yosemite station, 
and over against the Eastern sky, when the sun 
has passed the meridian, glisten the snow-capped 
peaks of the Yosemite range, towering up into the 
blue of the sky to an exaggerated height, and ap- 
parently not half so far away* as the actual dis- 
tance of 70 miles in an air line places them. 
Mount Whitney's sharp peak, glistening like a gi- 
gantic prism, pierces the ethereal blue, overtop- 
ping all its big comrades, standing like a silent 
sentry guarding the beauties of the wonderful Yo- 
semite. From Merced it requires two days each 
way to the valley, but over night stops are made 
at comfortable inns and the entire ride is made 
in daylight. Just to the west of the town of Mer- 
ced, over near the S. P. tracks, is the new mam- 
moth copper smelting plant recently completed by 
the California Copper Company, one of the new 
and successful enterprises of Merced county. Rich 
copper ore is found at Daulton, where the com- 
pany's mines are, in unlimited quantities. 

From Stockton to Point Richmond the road is 
all new. It runs through a country rich in scenic 
wonders, through fertile farms and green hills, 
pretty towns and suburban villages nearer to the 
bay and at the Point Richmond terminus, the pas- 
sengers are transferred to the new ferry depot in 
San Francisco, at the foot of Market street. 

Already the freight traffic that has come unso- 
licited to the Santa Fe speaks volumes for its pop- 
ularity. Their freight docks at Point Richmond and 
in San Francisco at the foot of Spear street pre- 
sent busy scenes. 

Some photographs, made during the trip above 
referred to, are submitted herewith, the better to 
describe the scenes on the Santa Fe's new posses- 
sions. W. J. ROUSE. 



To the Deaf 

A .lch lady, cured of her deafness and noises in 
the head by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drums, 
gave $100,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people 
unable to procure the Ear Drums, may have them 
free. Address No. 532c, The Nicholson Institute, 
780 Eighth Avenue, New York. 5-7-01 



GARDENING 
^CALIFORNIA 



i 



1 



...BY... 
W.S.LYONS 




156 PAGES 

ILLUSTKA ' I) 

BMBOSS8D : : 
paper : : : : 
covers : : : 



Hp IK only WORK 
A ever written for this 
soil and climate; entirely 
non technical and espe- 
cially adapted to amateurs. 
Heretofore sold at 50 CCIUS, 
will be reduced to close 
out an edition to 

2$ Cents 

and three cents postage. 




I 



AT A I.I. 
HOOK STORK? 



GEO. RICE & SONS, /»' 

311-313 
New High St. 
LOS ANUELES, CAL. 



A Tempting 
Proposition 

TEN-CENT OIL STOCK 

A better one is a $2f00 Lite Insur- 
ance [orfUa year In the popular 

Order of The Iroquois 

incorporated under the laws of 
the State of New York. For par- 
ticulars and literature send card 
to T. M. CHAPMAN 

2. r >0 N. Union Ave., L. A. 

*S~ Deputies make good pay. 
Several wanted for this territory. 




The 

Summer \ 
Man I 



£ is as much of a necessity as the summer 

I girl, and needs a proportionate amount 

J of attention. See our novelty flannel g 

g negligee suits, as low as $10.00, and 

? all the fixings that go well with them. 

I I 

LONDON CLOTHING COMPANY j 

i HARRIS A FRANK, Props. | 

117-125 North Spring Street % 

Te\ James 2311 if 
Res. Tel. Bine 456 

Orders for Cut Flowers \ 

and all kinds ol floral and feu 

decorative work carefully J 

Jj 440 S. Broadwuv attended to. )g 

All We Ask is Comparison 

of Goods and Prices 

sTw Carpets and Rugs 

Suits Hundreds of others and will suit you 

3x7 Shades only 45 Cents 



MISS OOODIN 

Florist . . 




I. T. MARTIN 



Wherl Chairs 
SPKINO ST. sold or rented 



§ _ 

Washstand Slabs, Table 'I ops, Coping, Foot- 
warniers, Hitching Posts. Soapstone and Ser- 
pentine from Catalina Island. 

All kinds of stone and marble work at lowest 
prices. We (juarry and manufacture. Whole- 
sale and retail. 



* 
* 
* 

m 
m 

1 
i 
* 

i 
i 

I Tel. 36 

««««**«A**ftA«««ft«»«»«ft«ft»ftftft»«ftftft 



BANNING CO. 

222 S. Spring St. 



NOTICE 

The Ixm Angeles City Water Company will strictly enforce 
the following rule: The hours for spri 11 k I n g are between 6 and 
8 o'clock a. m. and (1 and K o'clock p m. For a violation of the 
above regulations the water will be shut off, and a fine of $2.00 
will be charged before the water will be turned on again. 



10 




Western Graphic 
Where Cool Breezes Blow 



HOTEL REDONDO 

The Social Center 

The Finest Seaside Resort in 
Southern California 

1 O Trains Daily I Q 
10 Early and 1 te |0 

JOSEPH H. B0H0IN, manager 

REDONDO, CAL. 



"fanned by Ocean Breezes 




Island 

Cong 
Beach 

Catalina 
Island 



No better places for Ska Bathing, FlSHIHG 
YACHTING and Boating on the Pacific 
Coast. Fine hotels, good boarding houses. 
Elegant catnp grounds and pure water. 
Agents of the 

Los Angeles Terminal Railway 

Will sell you tickets and furnisli all desired 
information. 

Excursion Rates frequent Trains 

City Ticket Office, 237 So. Spring St.. Los Angeles 
F. K . Kixe, Gen. Mgr. T. C Peck, Geu. Pass A*t. 



I pREE CAMP GROUND 

With Pure Mountain Water 
| — at Avalon — 

Santa Catalina 
Island 

Under conditions prevailing last year. Dozens 
of swift power launches for fishing and excur- 
sions. Tuna Club tournament now on. Free 
concerts by our famous band of 20 soloists. 
The best golf links. The aquarium, containing 
hundreds of living wonders of the deep. Boat- 
ing and bathing over Nature's most wonderful 
marine gardens, as seen at great depth through 
smooth transparent waters, with the many 
other natural advantages, permits Catalina to 
offer attractions for season of 1900 not possible 
at other resorts. Daily steamer service, Her- 
mosa running Saturdays and Sundays. Hotel 
Metropole always open. Take Southern Pa- 
cific or Terminal Ry. trains,' leaving L. A. 
daily at 9:05 and 8:50 a. m., respectively. Fare 
round trip from Los Angeles, excursion $2.50; 
regular $2.75. 

222 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Telephone Main 36 



BANNING CO. 



I OS ANGELES PACIEIC R.R. 

The Scenic Route to 
Santa Monica.... 

LEAVE FOURTH 3T., Los Angeles, every thirty min- 
utes on the hour and half hour from 6.30 a.m. to 7.80 
p.m., 8.S0, 9.30, 10.30, 11.30. 

LEAVE BAND STAND, Santa Monica, every half 
hour on the quarter and three-quarter from 5.45 a.m. to 
7.45 p.m., 8.45, 9.45, 10.45. 



SANTA MONICA— This is the place. That is 
to say, if you are stopping at the Arcadia. 
There is no spot like this if you wish to 
combine business with pleasure. Just as you take 
up a spoon of consomme you may have that far- 
away look-out of the dining-room windows, and 
I give you my word you can see more sea than you 
ever saw before — over a spoonful of bouillon. And 
as you softly sip sips of Jevne's thirty tent per bot. 
you may be advertising a pet brand of Jack's zin- 
fandel, and at the same time be combining the 
unparalleled marine view — as the Arcadia adver- 
tisements say — a perfect symphony of the joys of 
the soul and spirit — or spirit first — I believe I 
mentioned Jevne's bot. first. 

And. by the way, Major Norton says the cuisine 
at the Arcadia is o. k. this year, and he knows. 
Last year — so the story goes — there was some tall 
kicking (to express it mildly) from the epicurean 
point of view, but this under the new management 
they say it is way-up, as it should be — and all is 
serene; and to return to Major Norton — the Major 
says there are moments when he thinks he is a 
fisherman — or is it a swimmer before breakfast? 
I have forgotten which. It may be only a fish story 
and in that case it may be set down under the 
Catalina column. I never heard more fish yarns. 
That is to say — 

It is quite entertaining how seasides are boomed. 
And to tell the truth they need it. Some are all 
boom. There is a story going of a man who read 
the ads. one day last week, packed his lunch box, 
and started for — never mind which — but it is the 
one you sometimes hear of in the papers. Poor 
man! He left the place before he got to it. And 

all he could gasp was, "Put me off at Santa 

Monica." 

The Arcadia is outdoing itself, if that were ne- 
cessary. It has its reputation from way-back of 
course to build on, but still like Oliver, it wants- 
more! The whole hotel has been put in excellent 
summer shape, many of the rooms have been re- 
fitted, and then there is the grill room in perfect 
working order. 

I believe there is to be special attention given to 
the Arcadia dances this year. Every beach has 
them, but I do not know of any pavilions that are 
so pleasant and so much like home as the newly 
fitted up ballroom of the Arcadia. Then the dances, 
naturally at so swell a hostelry will be very se- 
lect and guests are supposed to come by special 
invitation. There was quite a good representation 
last Saturday evening, and the dances will keep 
right along now every Wednesday and Saturday. 

If you looked over the hotel register you would 
see people from all over, but I do not know of a 
single guest as popular as Mr. Joachim of the 
Philippines. He is a small gentleman in yellow 
pajamas — that is what they call them — coat and 
trousers, but if you asked me I should say they 
were of the nankeen pantalette order of my youth. 

Mr. Joachim approves of America and thinks he 
will adopt us as his mother country. He thinks 
us not such a bad lot. He is quite intelligent and 
when the Colonel's wife enjoins him "not to spill 
the baby" he is trundling in a buggy, his eyes 
glisten with comprehension. 

Joachim? Why he is the Colonel's small Filipino 
bodyguard, aged about ten I should say, and his 
master brought him over himself. 

The Colonel? How stupid of me. The Colonel 
is — of course — Colonel Long, U. S. A., etc., etc., etc., 
of San Francisco and the little Long and the pe- 
tite Filipino are all stopping at the Arcadia. I 
thought everybody knew that. 

t^t (,^4 i£ 

AVALON — It looks very much like General 
A. W. Barrett was to the next president of 
the Tuna Culb. The position goes to the 
member taking the largest tuna during the season, 
and that honor thus far belongs to the General. 
Between the General and Mrs. Barrett, who is as 
ardent an angler as is her husband, they have con- 
trived to carry off all the honors of the tourna- 
ment up to date, the General having the largest, 
weighing 104 pounds, and Mrs. Barrett the small- 
est tuna. Never before in the history of the tuna 
fishing has there been one so small taken. The 
smallest heretofore was sixty pounds, and as the 
tuna is a migratory fish it was thought the small 
ones never reached these waters. The tuna which 
have been caught this season have ranged smaller 
than usual. Of the few caught last season almost 
one-third exceeded the mark of the highest record 
of this season, and the fish which won the presi- 
dency to Colonel Morehouse last summer weighed 
251 pounds. 

The "season" is now in full swing and the popu- 
lation of the tent city is now about 3000 and gain- 
ing at the rate of a thousand and more per week. 
The gayety centers about the music and dancing. 
The open air concerts by the Catalina Island band 
draws a crowd well up into the thousands every 
evening from 7:30 to 9 o'clock, when everybody 
adjourns to the pavilion where they either be- 
come wall-flowers or engage in the merry dance 
until 11. Hops are given at the Metropole on 
Wednesday and Saturday evenings, at which op- 
portunity is given the guests for displaying their 
swell clothes. The number of people on the island 
to date far exceeds that of any preceding year. 

A sad occurrence of the week was the death of 



Mrs. M. A. Reashaw of Los Angeles, which oc- 
curred on Tuesday from a shock to her nervous 
system by the attack of a monkey. Mrs. Reashaw 
was an aged lady of 83 years old, and while try- 
ing to find her tent she wandered along where 
"Chappie" keeps a monkey chained to a tree. She 
did not see the animal, and as she passed near the 
monkey made a spring from the tree and alighted 
upon her, scratching her in several places quite 
severely. The wounds were insignificant, but the 
mental shock was too great, and after lingering 
along in a semi-conscious state she was taken to 
her home in Los Angeles on Monday, and died 
the next morning. 

Three boats now run between San Pedro and 
Santa Catalina on Saturdays, the latest one being 
at 9 p. m., which will give opportunity for being 
present at the cake walk which will be given in 
the Metropole ballroom Saturday night. The com- 
petition will be limited to twenty-four couples. 

REDONDO BEACH— The royal game of golf 
has received a new impetus at Redondo. 
New players are blossoming on every bush 
and old ones are improving their stroke; all on 
account of the advent of one of the sure enough 
golfers from the land of golf. Mr. William Rob- 
ertson of Scotland is the latest acquisition of the 
Redondo Beach Country Club, and since he has 
assumed direction of its affairs interest in golf 
has increased very materially, and the club links 
have showed a decided improvement. Several men 
are now at work, under the supervision of Mr. 
Robertson, putting in three new greens. By this 
means the course will be lengthened considerably 
and in other ways much improved. When this 
work is finished all of the greens will be regraded 
and finished with a dressing of oil and white sand. 
Mr. Robertson, the club's new instructor, stands 
high as a professional exponent of golf, not alone 
because of his cleverness at the game, but on ac- 
count of his ability as a teacher. 

Waldo R. Norris and Earl Pursell were the hosts 
at a unique and enjoyable party at Hotel Redon- 
do Wednesday evening. Everyone appeared in 
juvenile dress, and juvenile manners and children's 
games completed the harmony. It was a jolly romp 
and the spirit of the occasion was maintained with 
childish fervor. A chafing-dish supper added to 
the pleasure of the occasion. The little tots pres- 
ent were: Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Ainsworth, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. G. Young, Misses Grace McCormack, Clark, 
Inez Clark, Louise McFarland and Ethel Mullins. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Pridham entertained with 
a little dinner party at the hotel Friday evening. 
The table was tastily arranged with cut flowers 
and long streamers of ribbon. Those who en- 
joyed the repast were: Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Ains- 
worth, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Young, Miss Grace 
McCormack, Miss Ethel Mullins, Messrs. Earl Pur- 
sell and Waldo Norris. 

One of the pretty affairs of the week was the 
luncheon given Thursday by Mrs. Dan McFarland 
at her summer cottage in honor of Mrs. Jennings 
of Ohio. Mrs. McFarland's guests were: Mrs. 
Jennings. Mrs. Thomas Lewis, Mrs. W. G. Young 
and Mrs. H. B. Ainsworth. 




A good instrument grows better as it 
grows older. A poor instrument doesn't 
last long enough to get anything but worse. 
Our collection of Banjos, Mandolins, Guitars, 
Violins, Autoharps and other instruments 
will be found superior to any others in qual- 
ity of make and finish and beauty of tone. 
By long experience in the business, we have 
gained a knowledge of all classes of musical 
instruments which enables us to offer only 
the best. We have parts for instruments and 
sheet music. Mail orders a specialty. 

The Bartlett Music Co. 

2}$-2$5 South Broadway 

Los Angtles, Cal. 



Western Graphic 



1 1 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert Henderson, Miss Hender- 
son and Mrs. Chas. H. Henderson of Riverside 
are enjoying the seaside at Hotel Redondo. 

John F. Francis was among the well-known An- 
gelenos who visited Redondo this week. 

W. G. Nevin, general manager of the Southern 
California Railway, has brought his family to Re- 
dondo for an extended stay. 

F. B. Childs of Pasadena entertained a party 
of friends at luncheon at the hotel Wednesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Porter and son have come 
down from Los Angeles to join the ranks of sum- 
mer idlers at Hotel Redondo. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Mossin will be at the hotel 
for some time this summer. 

During the past two days Redondo has been 
thronged by a gay party of enthusiasts who are 
attending the tournament of the Rendondo Beach 
Country Club. This evening a dance will be given 
in honor of the winners of the tourament and 
their freinds, and in large numbers society people 
from the city will be in attendance. The Satur- 
day evening dances at Hotel Redondo are always 
considered the social events of the summer season 
and are attended by most of the fashionable folk 
of Los Angeles. 



With the Butterflies 

Doings 5 Among ^ People ^ in the ^ Gay ^ Life 



SOMETHING has dropped. And we must 
really "go away." Maybe it was the weath- 
er. Call it the weather whether it was or 
not. Of course it would not do for publication, 
but the truth is, it is "the thing" to go out of town 
for the summer. It is economical. If you make 
up your mind to stay in your own happy home, 
you can't do it, and not entertain, some. Who is 
as much a slave as an up-to-date society dame? 
No, you must still see your friends. You would 
like sometimes to see them further, but what can a 
poor, fettered creature do? 

"Go away." You and the chicks can hie to 
mountain and shore and break the erstwhile chains 
for a bit and paw can take his piece of pie on 
the cellar stair. It is cheaper for paw, too; he 
should remember that when he begins to grumble. 

I dare say there are a favored few who are rich 
enough to stay at home and do as they please. I 
see the Van Nuys family, who are still revelling in 
all the joys of a fine brand new home, have thrown 
their hospitable doors open once more to the social 
world. This time it was a dance, and that lovely 
ball room at the top of the house was again called 
into requisition. It was for Miss Annis, the elder 
daughter of the house, who has just returned from 
school. There were about a hundred and fifty 
guests, all young people and mostly old school- 
mates of the young hostess. Mrs. Hubbell, Miss 
Bess Millar and Miss Adelaide Brown assisted. 

Then there are some others who have found 
real summery ways for entertaining their friends. 
Mrs. Abbott Kinney had the Monday Musical Club 
as guests at her cottage in Santa Monica on Mon- 
day afternoon and Miss Elsie Laux gave a farewell 
entertainment of some kind, also at Santa Monica, 
one day last week, to Miss Fanny and Miss Belle 
Coulter, to which the D. I. X. sorority of the High 
School, of which the young ladies are members, 
were all invited. The Misses Coulter are going 
abroad, or perhaps it is only one. At any rate, it 
lias been stated some dozen times in society col- 
umns, and it is not the fault of the newspapers 
if I am not quite certain on the point. 

And now we are having our picture in the pa- 
per, at least the picture of the Arcadia, Santa 
Monica, and that is all the same. There is a new 
little paper hailing from New York called The Re- 
sorter, published monthly, and it has a lovely pic- 
ture of "us" on the back page (of July). I am 
not quite certain whether resorter is a good word, 
and the paper goes to to use resorterer and resort- 
erings as — well, tbere is no use finding fault, it 
is a very swell little paper, all glazed, fine new 
print, and lovely pictures. Of course you know 
it is only an advertisement for all the hotels in 
tne country, but it is no use to tell folks that, es- 
pecially as we are going to have all our names in 
the next issue. Just think of seeing yourself all 
over New York, Washington and everywhere; how 
swell it will be and what an advertisement — and 
for nothing. Now, I see one whole page given to 
Senator Clark's daughter of Montana, and if all 
the world doesn't knt>w the story it can resort to 
the Resorter. It is an amusingly written up tale 
and tells how a party of a gentleman and lady — 
and some others that don't figure — had a little cor- 
ner to themselves in a big hotel dining room at 
Kichfield Springs. They were plain people and 
some dressed up folk in for the day took them to 
be a party of country people "driving over" on 
Sunday to have dinner at the hotel. There was 
only one discrepancy. A hireling of the joint (ex- 
cuse me) was furiously cooling a bottle of wine 
by spinning it in some such fashion as one spins 
a top, except that it was rolled first one way and 
then the other in the cracked ice. Of course the 
spectators believed that on occasions even some of 
the well-to-do people about the Otsego Hills could 
afford to splurge with a bottle of wine — once a 
year or so, if they chose. 

Then the story goes on that the main dressed up 
guy finally sauntered out to the register and read 
Dr. Lewis A. Moore, Mrs. Moore, &c, &c, &c. 

It does not interest us how Mr. Smarty stag- 
gered out for a breath of air when he found out 
that the country crowd contained the new son-in- 
law of the great Copper King, Senator Clark of 
Montana, and his bride, the young woman who 
upon her wedding day received a dowry of five 
millions. 

But it does interest us that sometimes one does 
come across a few people who do not let a little 
thing like four or five millions stand in the way 



of letting them enjoy themselves — like the rest of 
Ua — who are more fortunate. 

The story also told that the doctor was several 
feet higher than his bride, that he smoked and 
that he was all right. It is so comforting to know 
that. But the most interesting "feature" really 
was that the bride wore a tan skirt, tan shoes, a 
blue shirt waist and small sailor hat. I think the 
Resorter does not go in much for clothes. The 
picture on the frontispiece depicts a young lady m 
a meadow without any garments whatever. 

But to return to the story. It goes to show, as I 
always said, that it is only the rich who can afford 
not to dress. 

Come down to Terminal. Go to Catalina. Spend 
a day at Santa Monica. Sit on the Redondo piaz- 
za. And you will always notice that the girl who 
has the bedecked parasol, the flower garland hat 
and the lace-trimmed frock is the confectionery 
girl from Santy Auny. She who is wise gowns 
herself that — like Mrs. Burton Harrison's English 
girl — she may be either a princess or a waiting 
maid, you would not like to swear which — from 
her clothes. 

tiS^ 

I did hear a good one a few weeks ago and if it 
had not been the season of what the Los Angeles 
papers called "the gentle footpad" I could have 
made just the nicest kind of a hit. But as I said 
the gentle footpad was "on" and it did seem too 
bad to joke on so solemn an occasion. But this 
was a really truly hold-up. I give you my word 
there wasn't another hold-up as exciting as this — 
not even in the write-ups of the Evening Express 
— while it lasted. The trouble was, it did not last 
long enough — the way of all good things. It did 
not even wait long enough to rush the artist down 
to the station to take a snapshot for the Graphic. 
Yes, it was at the station — River Station. And in 
the nature of things you could not reasonably ex- 
pect an elegantly dressed and very swell lady to 
hold up a gun at her beloved's head for half a day 
or so till the electric cai got round from First and 
Spring, just for the delectation of the Graphic's 
readers. However, this was not the day time, it 
was about eight o'clock in the evening, and I have 
been curious ever since to know whether there 
was a San Francisco train out that night. There 
was a train of some kind. In any case, neither of 
the principals of this story boarded it. On the 
contrary the "gun" pointed toward a cab waiting 
by the track and my lady and gentleman boardeTT 
that and — went off in the shadows of the night 
just as fast as a fast pair of horses could take 
them. 

Who were they? Don't ask. me. Ask the train 
conductor; he says they hail from the West End. 
I haven't the remotest idea. Besides I was too 
much interested in noting the convincing effect of 
a gun when it is but a pistol "for two." Only I 
do not believe the man wanted to go to San Fran- 
cisco, or wherever it was, very badly, or he 
wouldn't have let a trifle like that keep him back. 

t^t tt?^ 

I suppose I ought to tell something of what our 
best people are doing — or going to do, but really I 
do not believe they know themeslves. Plenty of 
them have their own cottages at places, but do you 
know I notice a great many let even their seaside 
homes and skip to a hotel. Well, there is nothing 
like being able to drop everything once in a while 
and let things be done for you — just touch the 
button. Then if you do not go too far away paw 
can always come down over night. Paw is con- 
venient to have round sometimes. He can look 
after Sally and Anny and the rest of them while 
you take a walk — 

That is to say, some of the new brides tell me, 
there are moments when husbands had better be 
left alone. They appreciate you so much more the 
next time they see you. I am told it is much 
better to "shake" them before they begin to be 
in the way. That there is an old story about an 
ounce of prevention — whatever that is. 

I believe there were some new people at the 
Arcadia the past week. General and Mrs. E. P. 
Johnson were there, Colonel and Mrs. Tufts are 
guests right along, Major and Mrs. Norton spent 
a week at the hotel and will come back later on. 
Lieutenant and Mrs. Miner are expected. Dear me, 
I wonder whether I have the precedence in the 
right order. I did not know what I was getting 
into when I began. I wonder where Col. and Mrs. 
Blaisdell are, and what has become of Commodore 
Willie Childs. 



Tennis week, beginning August 13th, will take 
all the young folks to Santa Monica, and I sup- 
pose a number who were once young. The Ar- 
cadia will entertain a party of the Los Angeles 
social set, and I think Miss Christine Kurtz has 
taken the lead to prepare for a number of her 
friends. 

Miss Milner, the Misses Schwarz, Miss Louise 
Harris. Miss Freda Hellman, Mrs. Hugo Brandeis, 
Miss Etta Jacoby and a young lady not yet "out," 
Miss Marguerite Buckler of El Paso, seem to be 
absorbing most of the attention of the masculine 
fraternity, but they will have "to look a little out." 
There are some more coming and then — there will 
be a time. 

Mrs. Jessie Padgham was the guest of the Chap- 
mans at Santa Monica last week, and I believe 
Mr. and Mrs. McCutcheon have gone down to 
spend the summer with their friends. 

t$ t^t 

Miss Mabel Chute entertained a number of 
friends one evening last week. 

Mr. Clinton Ball of New York, who has been 
extensively feted since his arrival here, gave a box 
party at the Orpheum last Monday evening, prior 
to his departure for Albuquerque. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Herron and daughters have 
gone north to spend a month. 

Mrs. Earl B. Millar gave a very elegant card 
party on the 12th in honor of Miss Annls Van 
Nuys. 

Mrs. Richard Mercer and others have enter- 
tained recently for Miss Florence Neal. 

ANN IDLER. 



SANTA MONICA RESORTS 



f)otel Hrcadia 

Santa JVIomca 
by the sea 

finest Summer Resort on the pacific 

Elegant Hotel Elevator 
Electric Lights Orchestra 

SERVICE, TABLE, AND APPOINTMENTS 
UNEXCELLED 

Delightful, cool breezes from the ocean on 

warmest days. 
An ideal Summer Resort for those who wish 

to escape the heat of interior towns. 
The cleanest, smoothest and safest beach in the 

world. 

Surf bathing, boating, fishing, beautiful drives. 
Reached by S. P. R. R. trains and electric cars 

every half hour. Time from Los Angeles 

55 minutes. 
For rates and further information address 

W. E. ZANDER, Mgr. 



Ocean parfc^ 

Romes By the Sea So " tb of „ . 

banta Monica 

Ocean front, Kle(?ant bench, Water piped to tract, Electric IIkIi 
connection. Long lease, S10.00 to S . '5.00 yearly rental. The 
best opportunity ever offered to secure a home on the beach 

Ocean Hir & Ocean Beach 
Ocean Bathing 

Call on or address 

T. H. DUDLEY 

Corner Hill and Beach Streets 
Ocean l'ark 

Santa Monica 

will be more attractive this summer than 
before. There are No Saloons a New Club 
House for golf and tennis, a salt water 
Plunge filled daily and kept warm and 
many other things which ought to make it 
the best summer resort thi9 coming season. 
Address a letter to the North Beach Bath 
House Co. and we shall be glad to furnish 
you with all sorts of information about hotel 
rates, cottages, bathing, athletics or any- 
thing else you many desire to know. Let 
us help you locate this year. 



DAVIS M. CLARK 

REAL ESTATE, RENTAL AGENT 
I have a line list of Cottages anJ Building Lots for sale 
or rent. The finest Beach on the <~oast. 

not S. Second St., Oceanpark, 
At terminus of electric car lln L. A. C* . Cal. 



Western Graphic 



Oldest and Largest Bank In Southern California 

FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) J500.000 SURPLUS AND REHERVE $926,742 
Total 11,426,742 

OFFICERS 

I. W. HELI.MAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

G. HEIMANN Assistant Cashiei 

DIRECTORS 
\V. H. Perry C. E. Thom A. Glassell 

O. W. Childs I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 
J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 

•^-Special Collection Department. Our safety deposit depart • 
ment offers to the public, safes for rent in its new fire and 
burglar proof vault, which is the strongest, best guarded 
and best lighted in this city. 



W. C. Patterson, President 
M. P. Cbekn, Vice-Prest. 



W. D. Woolwine, Cashier 

E. W. CoE, Asst Cashier 



THE LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL 11500,000 SURPLUS and Undivided Profiits, JIOO.OOO 
United States Depositary 



I.etti -rs of Credit and Drafts issued available in all parts of 
the world. 

W. F. BOTSFORD, President J. G. MOSSIN, Cashier 

G. W. HUGHES Viee-Pres. T. W. PHELPS, Ass't Cashier 

CALIFORNIA BANK 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



DIRECTORS: 



W. F. Botsford G. W. Hughes R. F. Lotspeich 
w. H. Bnrnham B. w. Jones W. S. Newhall 
Homer Laughlin 1. B. Newton H. V. Winner 

Capital Stock $2.'>0,000 

surplus and Undivided Profits 35,000 

A General Banking Business transacted. 
Special attention given to Collections. 
Kxchanges sold on all part- of the world. 



H. J. Wooi.lacott, President 
J. W. A. Off, Cashier 



R. H. Howri.i., 1st Vice Pres. 
Wakken Gii.i.ei.en, 2nd V. P. 



STATE BANK & TRUST CO. 

Of Los Angeles. 

PAID-UP CAPITAI HALF MILLION DOLLARS 

DIRECTORS: 



R. H. Howell 
H. J. Woollacott 
J. A. Muir 
Wm. If. Garland 



J. W A. Off 
B. F. Porter 
F. K. Rule 



C. C. Allen 
A. W. Ryan 
Warreu Gillelen 
L. C. Brand 



A General Banking Business transacted. Interest paid on 
Time Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes for rent 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

MAIN STREET SAVINGS BANK 

Junction of Mam, Spring and Temple Sts. Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED »^0U,0U0 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits Monev loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUE President 

I. N. VAN NUYS Vice-President 

E. J. VAWTER, JR Cashier 

Directors — H. W. Hellman, Kas|>er Conn, H. W. O'Melveny 
L. Winter, O. T. Johnson, T. L. Duque, 1. N. Van Nuys, W. G 
Kerckhoff. A. Haas. 



CHAS. B P1RONI 

Sole Proprietor 



Located at West Olendale 
Los Angeles county 



West Glendale Winery and Vineyards 

Producer and Grower of 

High Grade Sweet and Table Wines 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TIME CARD 

Los Angeles and Redondo Ry. 

In EfT-ct June 3, 1900 

Depot: Corner Grand Avenue and Jefferson street 



Trains leave Los Angeles lor Redondo 
DAILY 


Trains leave Redondo lor Los Angelas 

DAILY 


8.10 am 


7.00 am 


11.30 am 


10.00 am 


3.30 pm 


1.30 pm 


6.30 pm 


5.00 pm 


•12.00 Night 


*11.(K) pm 



•Wednesdays and Saturdays only. 

Connecting witli Grand avenue or Main and Jefferson street 
cars at Los Angeles, city Office: 246 S. Spring at. Tel. M. 1031 

For rates on freight and passengers, apply at depot, corner 
Grand avenue and Jefferson St. Los Angeles Tel. West I. 

See Santa Fe schedule, tickets interchangeable. 

L. J. Pf.rry, Superintendent. 

The Pacific Coast Regalia Co. 

f\ . TENINANT GRAY 

ManU o.. ct ". re . rs Military and Society Goods 

Flags, Banners, Badges, . 
Uniforms and Swords •• HO •. 

Gold and Silver Trimmings ruviQ-r ccrnmrw ctheet 

Bullion Embroideries WEST SECOND STREET 



15 he Country 'R. ouad 

■ -> v< Notes on the Progress of Ovir Country ^ N£ 



ORANGES, grapes and walnut crops, all 
staples of Southern California, are looking 
well. 

tijt t,*& 

The sugar factory at Los Alamitos will open 
August 1st. The recent fogs have helped out the 
heets and a fair crop is in prospect. Many will 
receive employment at the sugar factory this 
year. 

Jl .4 t * 

The owners of apricot pits receive $7.50 a ton 
this year. This product was formerly thrown 
away, but now is in demand, and brings in a neat 
sum to large orchardists. 

t$ 

Considerable honey is coming into the market. 
A few of the bee men have done well this sea- 
son. 

The postoffice receipts of Los Angeles footed up 
June, 1899, $17,822; June, 1900, $19,941. That is a 
remarkable increase for the short space of twelve 
months. 

Mr. Rockefeller is credited with clearing $24,- 
000,000 the first six months of 1900. Some of our 
local oil men have hardly reached that cheerful 
figure. Still not a few can show profits which will 
keep the wolf from the door for several cycles to 
come. 

d$t 

There is a prospect that better prices for silver 
will prevail soon. The white metal is steadily ad- 
vancing. Stirring up the great Asiatic human 
hive has created a demand for more silver. All 
of which means prosperity. 

The total building permits for June, 1900, in 
this city aggregated $181,122. 

Among the interesting items of the Assessor's 
report for 1900 is that there are in the county 
bearing fruit trees as follows: Oranges, 562,990; 
peaches, 125,950; lemons, 114,490; apricots, 108,- 
715; walnuts, 98,860; prunes, 73,860; other varie- 
ties, about 100,000. There are about half a mill- 
ion non-bearing trees. Rarely is an Assessor able 
to secure complete figures. Probably this report 
shows less than two-thirds of the fruit trees of 
the county. 

A financial institution representative of South- 
ern California's prosperity is the Farmers' and 
Merchants' Bank of Los Angeles. The growth of 
this section has been remarkable, continuous, and 
is based upon the actual development of the coun- 
try. It is an advertisement of our resources here, 
most effective of its kind, to note the fact that, 
notwithstanding the numerous other excellent 
banking facilities in Los Angeles, the Farmers' and 
Merchants' Bank showed last week total assets of 
$6,601,725.12; total, deposits, $5,135,406. 

Jit J* Jt 

The fact that there are considerable iron de- 
posits in Southern California has been known for 
a long time. Mineralogists have discovered large 
lodes in various localities, most of which have 
been filed on. There seems now a disposition, 
cheap fuel being assured, to open up some of these 
claims and work them to the fullest extent. The 
oil and iron industries can easily be combined, 
as is shown by Pittsburg, Pa., where they have 
been the chief factors in creating a great city. 

Rudyard Kipling in his "American Notes," had 
the following concerning California and the Cali- 
fornians: 

"Recklessness is in the air. I can't explain 
where it comes, from, but there it is. The roar- 
ing winds of the Pacific make you drunk to begin 
with. The aggressive luxury on all sides helps 
out the intoxication, and you spin forever "down 
the ringing grooves of change" (there is no small 
change, by the way, west of the Rockies) as long 
as money lasts. They make greatly and they 
spend lavishly; not only the rich, but the artisans, 
who pay nearly five pounds for a suit of clothes, 
and for other luxuries in proportion." 

It will be observed that a part of the Kipling 
idea of extravagance is the expenditure by an arti- 
san of something less than $25, United States 
money, for a suit of clothes. Mr. Kipling con- 
tinues as follows, and, taken as a whole, throws a 
bouquet to our Native Sons: 

"The young men rejoice in the days of their 
youth. At twenty they are experienced in busi- 
ness, embark in vast enterprises, take partners as 
experienced as themselves, and go to pieces with 
as much splendor as their neighbors. Remember 
that the men who stocked California in the fifties 
were physically, and, as far as regards certain 
tough virtues, the pick of the earth. The inept 
and the weakly died en route, or went under in 
the days of construction. To this nucleus were 
added) all the races of the Continent — French, 
Italian, German, and, of course, the Jew. 

"The lesult you can see in the large-boned, 
deep-chested, delicate-handed women, and long, 
elastic, well-built boys. It needs no little golden 



badge swinging from the watch-chain to mark the 
native son of the Golden West, the country-bred 
of California. 

"Him I love because he is devoid of fear, carries 
himself like a man, and has a heart as big as his 
books. I fancy, too, he knows how to enjoy the 
blessings of life that his province so abundantly 
bestows upon him." 

Kipling's conclusion was that Californians are 
what may be termed, in the colloquial, as "high 
steppers," but excuses the tendency as follows: 

"Well, if I lived in fairy-land, where cherries 
were as big as plums, plums as big as apples, and 
strawberries of no account, where the procession 
of the fruits of the seasons was like a pageant in 
a Drury Lane pantomine and the dry air was 
wine, 1 should let business slide once in a way 
and kick up my heels with my fellows. The tale 
of the resources of California — vegetable and min- 
eral — is- a fairy-tale. You can read it in books. 
You would never believe me." 

& ,4 

Eight deaths from sunstroke was the record of 
Chicago for July 4, 1900, and there were 27 deaths 
and 96 prostrations from heat during July up to 
Sunday morning, July 8th, in the same city. All 
the great centers of the Eastern States make a 
showing almost as terrible. The range of the ther- 
mometer when these casualties occur, is rarely 
much above 90 degrees, but the humidity is at the 
bottom of the trouble. 

A Fullerton man went insane at Joliet, 111., last 
week owing to the intense heat and committed 
suicide on a Santa Fe train. 

The fact is not well understood in the Atlantic 
and Middle Western States that the coast cities 
of Southern California have a summer climate far 
in advance of the best ocean resorts from Maine 
to Florida. From Santa Cruz to Coronado the 
cool ocean breezes make heat hardly noticeable. 
It is not probable there has been a single pros- 
tration, caused by the sun's rays, anywhere on 
the coast this summer. A few extremely hot days 
may be expected in July, August and September, 
but the laborer can work outdoors without the 
slightest danger to his health. In the interior val- 
leys the summer heat is often very uncomfortable 
during the entire season. Thus, at Stockton, the 
thermometer reached 103 degrees in the shade last 
Saturday. The dwellers of the San Joaquin valley 
are beginning to follow the wise example of Ari- 
zona and find comfort in the Southern California 
coast counties, from June to October. It is sur- 
prising that our railroads do not make the facts 
concerning California's summer more prominent 
in their advertising matter. A "Limited" train is 
really needed here every day in the year, and 
would be liberally patronized, were the facts 
known. 

Unfortunately temperature tables from Califor- 
nia are calculated to arouse suspicion. It is dif- 
ficult to believe that a shade temperature here of 
90 degrees is not only not dangerous to the full- 
est outdoor exercise, but almost as agreeable as 
a 70 degree temperature the other side of the con- 
tinent. Prominence should be given the facts by 
scientific men in whom the public have confidence. 
It is absolutely cruel not to inform the suffering, 
gasping, dying multitudes east of us that there is 
a means of escape. 

Guide books to Florida, Cuba, Porto Rico, Ja- 
maica, Hawaii and the Philippines, all warn vis- 
itors not to expose themselves to the rays of the 
sun, eat fruit or drink ice water, the greater part 
of the daylight from May to October. That the 
same is true of most of the United States east of 
the Mississippi is shown by the frequent reports 
of death and disability by sunstroke. Among the 
numerous white people resident in India the bu- 
bonic plague is almost disregarded, while the hu- 
mid heat is so much feared that Julian Hawthorne 
says even at night on the trains he traveled with 
ice bandages bound to his temples and wrists. 

A recent dispatch from Honolulu reports the 
government clerks from the States demand more 
pay. They find it impossible, owing to the hfat, 
to walk in summer to their places of business and 
must hire vehicles at considerable expense. 

Few, if any, climates in the world compare fa- 
vorably with California — taking every day in the 
year into consideration. The Mediterranean coun- 
tries are perhaps the nearest approach, where, in 
the world's early history, in Palestine, Egypt, 
Greece and Italy those wonderful nations grew up 
which gave the world its first real civilzation and 
its best religion. HERBERT. 



The property of the actress, Sarah Siddons, was 
sold not long ago: it was naturally full of signifi- 
cance to the fair sex. An ivory box which had 
held the patches of the great tragedienne, her 
toothpick and a snuff-box (with the snuff still in 
it), a gold penholder, a bouquet of artificial flow- 
ers (which formed one of her stage possessions), 
and a book of Shakespeare's plays, with an auto- 
graph inside the cover, were among the most in- 
teresting of the personal effects of this eminent 
actress. 



Western Graphic, 

HEADS OF THE EXPOSITION 

Some Felicitous Personalities 

By BEN. C. TRUMAN 



i.; 



Paris, France, June 30, 1900. 

WE Americans are apt to find fault with the 
French, the Germans, the Italians, and, 
even the English, on account of some glar- 
ing peculiarities that they seem to possess, and 
that are more or less offensive to us. But there 
is one single American "attribute" that lays over 
all others of all nationalities — and that is fault- 
finding and slander. It makes no difference who 
or what he is, be he successful applicant for of- 
fice, successful architect, sculptor, painter, or con- 
tractor: — and May, Blanche and Sweetheart art 
furiously at his heels. Just at present Ferdinanc 
W. Peck, scholar, gentleman, and U. S. Commis- 
sioner-General to the Paris Exposition, is the ob- 
ject of hate of every architect, contractor, artist, 
and builder that failed to get a job on the United 
States pavilion and more than six thousand other 
applicants for clerkships and other positions. 
This tremendous mob have assailed him in Con- 
gress, in the newspapers, in the pulpit, on the 
streets and in barrooms. They have insisted that 
his pavilion is dangerous; they have declared him 
generally incapable; and may have publicly stated 
that he is dishonorable, dishonest, disgruntled, and 
a damned fool; and some have gone so far as to 
impart the dreadful information, privately and 
sacredly, of course, that he is broke — that he is 
poor! Well, if the latter were really the case, 
then, I suppose, I, too, with all my characteristic 
milk of human kindness, would be compelled to 
give him the grand shake until we again met with 
the Vanderbilts and Jay Goulds, the Sharons and 
Jim Fairs, the burglars and receivers of stolen 
goods, the Sunday school teachers and newspa- 
per writers, shyster lawyers and other vermin in 
the happy land of Canaan. But this last charge 
is really not true. He may be a thief, an idiot, 
and thoroughly dishonorable and incompetent — as 
is claimed by the disappointed ones — but he is 
not broke nor poor, thank God! The fact is, Fer- 
dinand W. Peck is a perfect gentleman, and thor- 
oughly competent to carry out any enterprise he 
may attempt. He is a graduate of the Chicago 
University and a trustee of that institution. He 
was for many years connected with banking and 
other corporations, member of the Chicago Board 
of Education, Vice-President of the Columbia Ex- 
position, and was sent to Europe by the govern- 
ment in behalf of that Exposition. He has not 
only never stolen anything nor committed a sin- 
gle disgraceful act in his life, but his whole ca- 
reer as boy, man, husband, father and creator of 
various commercial and educational activities, has 
been one without blemish of any kind. As Com- 
missioner-General he has shown great tact in sur- 
rounding himself with persons of rare experience 
and ability. If he possesses a single fault it is 
perhaps that he is too approachable, too unosten- 
tatious. Surely, he is a most amiable, elegant 
person. I have never heard him swear, nor wit- 
nessed an act of impoliteness or impatience on his 
part in the slightest way. I have met him at sev- 
eral banquets and at other social gatherings and 
have found him moderate in all things and really 
an example to those who might be inclined to 
burn the candle too rapidly at both ends. So far 
as the United States pavilion is concerned, it is 
a credit to the Commission and stands equally 
well with any other structure on the Rue des Na- 
tions. Being an American I like it best, of all- 
It reminds me of the Capitol at Washington. It is 
striking and fine. If I liked the Italy, or Turkey, 
or Roumania building better, or any other, it 
would be because I am either not a good Ameri- 
can or incapable of estimating the appropriate- 
ness of such things. Just imagine, if you will, 
what the Germans would have said had its com- 
mission erected pavilions like those of Spain, 
Sweden or Servia. Besides, the American pavilion 
is a place of rest. You may remain wherever you 
please and as long as you please in any any of 
its stories or apartments. You are taxed for no- 
thing whatever. There are a thousand reminders 
of our home and of our nation and every one is 
entitled to all the public comforts — which are pro- 
fuse — without embarrassment and without pay. 
And, better than everything else, there is nothing 
for sale — there are no pedlars, fakers, or other 
nuisances. Below, in the basement, along an ar- 
cade on the Seine, is a restaurant, where one 
may obtain an American meal, a la carte, in good 
form and at moderate prices — the only one on the 
Rue des Nations. 

I shall not be amazed if, after we have folded 
our tents and sought the Gare St. Lazare, with our 
baggage safely on its way to Cherbourg in the 
hold of a steamer of the famous North German 
Lloyd — and for years after, when many another 
name* shall have been forgotten, that of Benjamin 
D. Woodward will be lisped by children not yet 
born on account of his tremendous efficiency, in- 
comparable urbanity and everlasting willingness 
to do the right thing by everybody and help all 
who help themselves. I hardly need mention that 
this Benjamin D. Woodward, whose name has been 
so much mentioned in connection with the Paris 



Exposition, is an American. He is the Associate 
Commissioner, and has been highly successful at 
banquets as a speaker. He smiles genially on his 
audience, and says delightful things in perfect 
French. His French is so academic that it has 
become a topic of conversation. A Parisian ven- 
tured the remark that the Associate Commissioner 
spoke with an American accent. Mr. Woodward 
overheard the remark and, with an air of one dis- 
closing a secret, said, "Yes, I*m an American." He 
added that he failed to see why he should be ex- 
pected to infect his French with a German or a 
Japanese accent. We have sat beside each other 
at more than one banquet — and I can say of him, 
of my own knowledge, that he is a past-master of 
gustatory ethics. Fred Skiff says of Woodward, 
that he can sit at his desk all day and do the 
work of half a dozen men and sit at a dinner table 

every night and but this man Skiff sometimes 

slanders Woodward in speaking of the nocturnal 
engagements of his distinguished colleague. 

Well, we all know Fred Skiff, Chief of Mines and 
Mining of the Columbia Exposition, and one of the 
brainiest men in the country this minute. I re- 
member when his name was mentioned by the 
"Chicago Board," as against two or three old 
mossy professors, whose erudition nearly made 
Skiff faint away, one of them asked "Who is this 
fellow Skiff who wants this place?" and was an- 
swered, "O, he's some chump from Colorado who 
has no scientific attainments whatver." And when 
the chump was introduced; and after he had told 
the Board a heap of things he knew, and said to 
his inquisitors there were lots of things he didn't 
know, they elected the chump from Colorado 
unanimously, and the professors at once got. them- 
selves back to their shelves in the Smithsonian 
Institution and to other ethnological and anthropo- 
logical museums, and called the little magician of 
the Rockies chump no more. The Commission 
came down on Mr. Skiff much in the same man- 
ner, it is presumed, that a turkey gobbler snatches 
a June bug, but then the work which will be a 
lasting credit to our country commenced right 
then and there. If Woodward labors all day and 
eats all night, our Superintendent of Exhibits 
works the entire 24 hours and only eats between 
times. Seriously, Mr. Skiff is the right man in tin- 
right place — able, industrious, obliging, sometimes 
aggressive, but always just, and an awfully good 
fellow all the time. 

But I am admonished that I cannot control too 
much of your space. So I must briefly say that the 
United States Commissioner-General and his whole 
staff are a superb sequence. There are no insects 
on any of them, and they have treated the Cali- 
fornia Commission tremendously well. We nave 
had lots of additional space given us, and generally 
we have picked our own place for exhibits. In 
nearly all the classes we are to be seen where the 
biggest crowds are compelled to pass. Our tim- 
bers, fisheries, minerals and fresh fruit are in the 
most conspicuous places in the United States sec- 
tions, and the French have given no nation better 
or more favorable space. In the agricultural, ali- 
mentary and viticultural space alloted us we are in 
admirable places. I cannot find words to express 
how well we have been treated; and I am free to 
say that if the California Commission cannot come 
home with flying colors and other honors, it will 
not be the fault of the United States Commission. 
And among others to be thanked are Commissioner 
Baker, U. S. N., and Willard A. Smith, both of 
whom were at the Columbia Exposition, which 
means that they have had previous experience; 
Tarleton Bean and Professor Dodge, men of va- 
ried and excellent knowledge; then there are Cape- 
hart and Simms, and others. The Secretary of the 
U. S. Commission, Colonel Brackett, an old army 
officer and a Loyal Legion-eer, also had experience 
at Chicago, and is an energetic and accomplished 
as he is genial and true. All these have treated the 
California Commission in the most distinguished 
manner. They have gone out of their way to help 
us "get there." They have refused the Commis- 
sion no single request; they have given us points 
where we needed them in securing favorable con- 
sideration at the hands of jurors of contradictory 
impulse, and have extended so many other favors 
that it were impossible to enumerate them without 
the use of more than two figures so I'll let it go 
at that. BEN C. TRUMAN. 



His majesty of Portugal is a first-class pigeon 
shot and so keen on this particular form of sport 
that the Lisbon club bids fair to become the most 
noted center on the continent. The last meeting 
had a particular interest, because of a magnifi- 
cent seventeenth-century, enameled silver dish 
which was being competed for. The king made a 
heavy score. The coveted prize was borne off by 
Senor Alfredo O'Neill, and when the result was de- 
clared considerable amusement was caused by 
some wag who called out, "By the powers, but 
it's Ireland forever!" At the next meeting a 
prize given by the king will fall to the biggest 
score. 



In the 
World 



Strongest 

THE EQUITABLE 
LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY of New York 

It gives protection that protects Inot for a 
day, but for all time) with a 

Surplus of over #61,000,000 

The largest held by any company on earth. 
In surplus there is strength; and from 
surplus earnings 

Dividends are Paid 

More than 

One Million Dollars 

A month was paid to our policy holders in 
18!)!», and almost as much in 

Living Benefits 

This great financial institution issues 5 
per cent 

Guarantee Income Bonds 

Which may be paid for on the installment 
plan. Send in your date of birth, on 
receipt of which we will mail pamphlet 
giving full discription. 



Southern California Department 

A. M. SHIHLDS, - - MANAGER 
W. H. CRAMER - - CASHIER 
414-416-418-420 Wilcox Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



YOSEMITE 
VALLEY 

SEASON NOW OPEN 

Visit the valley early and enjoy the 
spring-tide bloom and the majesty of 
the marvelous waterfalls at their 
Hood. Comfortable stages carry you 
through the great forests of the 
Sierras to this wonderland and there 
arc lirst-clnss hotels for your accom- 
modation. Any agent of the South- 
ern Pacific Company will make reser- 
vation and give you full particulars 
concerning the trip to the Yoscmite 
and the companion marvel 

MARIPOSA 
BIG TREES 

.Special rates from I.os Angeles and 
Southern California to Yoscmite and 
return, with special sleepers. 
Inquire at or address 

Southern Pacific Co. 

261 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Longo 



The Ladies' and Gentlemen's 

Has now the handsomest establishment of 
its kind in Southern California at 

222 S. Broadway 

It is in accord with the reputation of his 
(iarments. They are the recognized 
Standard 

Longo 



Ladies and C/ if 
Gentlemen's 1 &IIOV 




14 



Western Graphic 



Amorvg the Mum rx\ e r s 

In tKe Eyes of the Critic- -Coming Events 



THE absence of any attractions at the Los 
Angeles and Burbank has given the Or- 
pheum a monopoly on entertaining the pub- 
lic this week, a task that falls lightly upon the 
shoulders of Manager Bronson. Though the 
houses have been good they would undoubtedly 
have been packed had every one known of the 
comfort effected by the ice and fans at either end 
of the proscenium. 

Miss Lillian Burkhart has made her first mis- 
take. In the production of "A Garret Salvation." 
there is nothing to praise except the frequent evi- 
dences of the fact that Miss Burkhart is capable 
of better things. Melodrama has no place on the 
vaudeville stage, and the disapproval of the audi- 
ence for condensed dime novels was apparent in 
the feeble applause, which would have been en- 
tirely withheld for any less a favorite actress. 

The story concerns a gambler, his pseudo-wife 
(the program has it "wife," contrary to the at- 
mosphere of the play), and a tender-hearted West- 
erner who is lured to the woman's room to be 
drugged and robbed and possibly murdered. It is 
developed in their conversation that the gentleman 
from Arizona is the happy father of a little boy 
whose name happens to be the same as that of 
the woman's dead baby, which fact causes sensa- 
tions in the mother's heart that result in her un- 
doing. Snatching the glass of drugged water from 
the man's hand, she bades him fly for his life, 
while in the glory of her at least one righteous 
act she awaits the coming of her "husband," who, 
infuriated at her allowing their victim to escape, 
brutally murders her — happily off the stage. The 
"Nancy Sykes" curtain is not convincing. It takes 
a Nance O'Neil, with her tremendous force, to 
thrill an audience with the spectacle of a dying 
woman. 

The playlet lacks color. It has the dismal ef- 
fect of "Rizpah Misery;" and the winsomeness and 
vivacity of Lillian are too familiar to allow of such 
a departure into the lugubrious. 

On Thursday evening Miss Burkhart appeared 
as an actress and playwright, "Her Soldier Boy" 
being the first playlet from her pen. It was in- 
finitely better than many plays with great names 
as their principal merit. It tells a pretty story 
of a young officer falling in love just prior to his 
departure for the Philippines, introducing those 
phases of a woman's temperament which Miss 
Burkhart knows best how to portray — gentle jeal- 
ousy, the first burst of revealed love, the sweet 
thoughtfulness, and at last the pitiful grief when 
her soldier boy has gone. In all these is a thread 
of delicate humor so nicely blended with the tears 
that every feeling is touched at once. At the cur- 
tain, when the girl is left alone, she throws 
herself upon the floor in a rush of tears, at the 
same time exclaiming, "O, I wish he had taken the 
pajamas." 

That old pair of whirlwinds. Gilbert and Goldie, 
are on again with their rapid-fire guns of fun and 
nonsense. Their act is really exciting, so furious 
is their work, and with the exception of a few 
rather broad jests their fun was new and accept- 
able. 

Joe J. Sullivan and Carrie Webber do a "far- 
cette" called "The Janitor," in which long drawn 
out silliness is the principal feature. 

Carrington, Hall and Galpin are a surprising trio. 
They indulge for the greater part of their twenty 
minutes in the most inane and boorish dialogue, 
concluding with a fine ensemble number liko unto 
grand opera. Why they choose to cheapen them- 
selves with a beer hall sketch when they are cap- 
able of as good things as was evidenced in the 
finale is beyond comprehension. 

The Musical Dale is a man who plays bells and 
rattles and concertina to a degree of excellence 
that earns him a nice round of the glad hand on 
the end of the bill. 

Sidney Deane. who has a fine baritone voice for 
legitimate work, descends to cheap limelight ef- 
fects and elephantine gyrations, but as I prophe- 
sied last week the girls all love him and when 
feminine gloves begin to patter, male escorts must 
join in, and as a consequence Mr. Deane retired 
amidst resounding plaudits. 

Chas. E. Grapewin and company do a new com- 
edy, called "A Mismated Pair," in which he suc- 
cessfully essays a difficult character role. 

i£ 

Cues for the Public 

IT is now an assured fact that Harry Wyatt is 
to retain control of the Los Angeles theater, 
having made arrangements with Mr. Myerfeldt 
for a two years lease. For some time Mr. Wyatt 
has been booking attractions for the coming sea- 
son, and promises some fine shows. 

Oliver Morosco is in the East, arranging for 
people and plays. The Burbank will open about 
the first week in August. 

Pretty and shapely chorus girls who can sing 
and dance are in great demand in New York and 



competition among managers to secure them Is 
very sharp. 

Eastern impressarios are predicting that next 
season no play on the American stage will make 
as much money as the Olga Nethersole version 
of "Sapho." Managers Brady and Grismer have al- 
ready booked two companies for the entire ap- 
proaching season and they have received so many 
applications for the production from out of town 
managers that they are seriously contemplating 
the organization of another strong company. 

William Farnum, the young actor who plays 
Ben-Hur next season, is a splendidly developed 
athlete. He is 26 years old, stands 5 feet 11 inches 
and weighs 190 pounds. His chest measure is 42 
inches and his biceps lb 1 /* inches. In his build he 
compares favorably with the famous strong men, 
Sampson, Sandow. Rolandowe and Max linger. 
An actor who can look Ben-Hur as well as act 
the part is a valuable acquisition to this play. 

Maclyn Arbuckle, the comedian, is writing 
sketches to be called "Red River Bottom Politics." 
in which he will detail the humorous side of po- 
litical life in Texas, and some of his experiences 
in a canvas for the office of Justice of the Peace 
in Texarkana. 

ti$^ 

In 1889 Jerome Sykes was a young comic opera 
singer struggling for recognition. He had begun 
his career in an opera company in Baltimore four 
years before, and had been side-tracked for two 
seasons playing "heavies" in a prairie dramatic 
company. He landed in Kansas City "broke." He 
met "Punch" Wheeler, then a well-known advance 
man. They compared notes. They had $30 be- 
tween them. After an hour spent in deliberation, 
they decided to "put out" an opera company. In 
another hour they had brought together nine 
people and had formed "The Alcazar Opera Com- 
pany." In two days they were on the road. They 
had overcome the difficulty of securing a chorus 
by hiring a scenic artist to paint one on a drop. 
They "stayed out" with this "troupe" over nine 
months and made a living, playing small towns in 
Texas and places in Mexico. "Punch" Wheeler 
went ahead and gave the local manager his choice 
from a large repertoire, but they always played 
"The Mascot." They made it fit any title and no 
one seemed to notice the difference. 

In Piedras Nagras, Mexico, the manager selected 
"Erminie" from "Punch" Wheeler's list. The ad- 
vance man tried to convince him that "The Mas- 
cot" was much better, but the Mexican would not 
yield. So "Erminie" was billed and "Punch" was 
in despair. He did not dare play "The Mascot" 
under the title of "Erminie" because of the strin- 
gency of the Mexican law. There might be a Mex- 
ican present who could expose the deception. They 
had a copy of the play, "Robert Macaire," on 
which "Erminie" was founded, and started at ten 
in the morning to improvise the opera with this as 
the book. The curtain rung up a ten o'clock that 
night, the usual hour, on Sykes and Wheeler's orig- 
inal production of "Erminie." When there was a 
break "Sykes" would knock the actor playing 
"Jack Strop" all over the stage, or sing "When 
Love is Young All the World Seems Gay." The 
performance was a hit and "The Alcazar Opera 
Company," nine people with the chorus painted on 
a drop, was invited to play a return date. But 
times have changed with "Jerry" Sykes. He now 
has no worry and next season will play the lead in 
Klaw & Erlanger's big production of "Foxy Quil- 
ler" with 20 principals and a real chorus of 100 
people to support him. "Punch" Wheeler, too, has 
escaped the troubles of theatrical life and is now 
a railroad agent in Chicago. 



Orphcum 

The famous Four Cohans, considered the great- 
est quartette of comedy players in America, are to 
be the chief new attraction at the Orpheum next 
week. They have not appeared at the local house 
for two years. That they will receive a great 
welcome is a certainty. They will present the 
latest George Cohan farce, "The Governor's Soh." 
It scored one of the greatest hits ever known in 
San Francisco, where the Cohans conclude today 
a lengthy engagment. 

The Todd family of acrobats were imported 
from Europe by the Orpheum circuit. They per- 
form feats not attempted by any other acrobats in 
the world. 

Musical Dale; Gilbert and Goldie; Webber and 
Sullivan and Carrington, Holland and Galpen, are 
all on the bill. 



sired supper. But none was forthcoming. For 
cooks and serving maids had gone to bed in ig- 
norance of the appetizing effects of a smoking 
concert. Accordingly the kaiser had to go with- 
out. It is surprising he took the matter so calmly, 
for a hungry man is to be an angry man, and 
smaller things have provoked the imperial wrath. 
But if he took it coolly the empress did not. When 
she heard of it she gave orders that in future re- 
freshment was to be left for the emperor every 
night when he was out, so that it should be ready 
for him to eat if he wished food. 

* <!* Jt 

Be careful how you speak of a woman's charac- 
ter. Think how many years she has been build- 
ing it, and of the toil and privations endured, of 
the wounds received, and let no suspicion follow 
her actions. Her purity is the salvation of the 
race and hope of future greatness and the redemp- 
tion of man. Wipe out her purity, and man sinks 
beneath the wave of despair with not a star to 
guide his life into the channels of safety. Think, 
then, before you speak, and remember that it is not 
difficult, to root up the fairest flower that ever 
grew. 



Westlake Park 



Program for Sunday afternoon, July 15. 2:30 p. 
D>., at Westlake Park: 

March— Stars and Stripes Sousa 

Waltz— Zenda Witmark 

Selection — Les Huguenots Meyerbeer 

Evening Star from Tannhauser Wagner 

Canadian Songs— On the St. Lawrence 

arr. Laurendeau 

The Mosquito Parade Whitney 

Potpourri— Cheveliers Coster Songs Godfrey 

New Medley— Broadway to Tokio Sloane 

Overture Medley— The Limit Mackie 

Two Step— Under Fire Russell 

Star Spangled Banner. 
J* ,* jt 
Hollenbeck Park 

Program for Sunday evening, July 15, 7:30 p. m.. 
Hollenbeck Park: 

March— Triumph Brooks 

Waltz— Fleur de Alsace Steiner 

Selection — Macbeth Verdi 

A Hunting Scene Bucalessi 

A New Jersey Parade Whitney 

Medley — Broadway to Tokio Sloane 

Love Dreams after the Bai Czibulka 

Serenade — The Voice of Love Schuman 

Medley Overture — The Corker Mackie 

Patrol— The Blue & Grey Dalbey 

Green and yellow Traction cars run direct to 
the park. The cars of the Traction company now 
connect, at the new Fourth street viaduct station, 
with all trains on the Terminal Railway. The 
new station is easily accessible to and form trains 
and will be largely patronized during the beach 
season. 

MAIN 8TEEET 
BET. FIE8T 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing flonday, July 16 

Sulli* an and Weber, laughable specialty "The Coal Man" 
4 Conns George M., Josephine. Helen F., Jerry J., presenting 

"The Governor's Son." Introducing new pecialtles. 
Todd- Judge Family Most marvelous acrobats on earth 
Carrington, Holland and Galpen, a Comedy Trio 
Gilbert and Goldie, ComedianB, Singers and Dancers 
Musical Dale— The Peer of all Instrumentalists 




PRICES never changing— 25c and 50c: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
bouse: Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 



| Imperial Co ™f c ™ 



Family Restaurant' 
and Oyster ParlorsJ* 

2<3 S. SPRING STRTCT 

Phone IOI 242 s. broadwav... 

Grand Concerts daily from 12 noon to 1.30 p. m. 
6 to 7 and 8 to 12 evenings. Orchestra under direction 
of P. J. Franks, late of Chicago. Everything nrst-chus. J5 
Theater Parties a Specialty Jh 
HALMER <t PUTZMAN, Managers. 



Even a king may perforce have to go supperless 
to bed. The other day the German emperor at- 
tended a smoking concert given by the officers 
of a regiment of the guard. Returning home at 
midnight he expressed himself hungry and de- 



CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

Room 201, 223 "W. Second St., Los Angeles 
Tel. Main 1415 Membership Fee 50 cents 

Books rented at 5 cents the week -5 cents for delivery 

Seventy-five Cents worth of Magazines rented for 25 CenU 
Five 10-cent Magazines rented for 20 cents. One you keep 
For $3.75 we rent you five 10-cent Magazines the month, 
and give you a year's subscription to the 
Western Graphic 

Subscriptions taken for all Publications 
All leading Coast and Eastern Papers on File. 



MUSICAL PRINTING 

TOP NOTCH STYLES 

Concert Programs, Announcement Folders, Fine Engraving 
Beat Stationery 

WESTERN GRAPHIC, 
Tel Main 1053 311 New High street 



Western Graphic 



15 



Continued /torn pagt ; 



While under guard I tried to converse. I told 
them my best stories, I praised Monkton, I blasted 
Stockton, nothing could draw them out of their 
lethargy. 

I was shunned as a culprit, I was a prisoner 
waiting for the verdict. 

It grew unsufferably hot; but bodily discom- 
fiture was nothing to my mental disturbance 
when I thought of the adhesive properties of those 
stamps. 

Then with solemn visage, the committee, headed 
by the Mayor, filed in. 

"It's against me," I thought. 

"Stranger," said the Mayor, in a hollow voice, 
as he seated himself on a barrel, "we have de- 
cided, and I will now proceed to — (pronounce sen- 
tence, I thought) — to tell you all." 

Though greatly relieved, my thoughts still lin- 
gered on the contents of my inside pocket. 

His Honor began by saying that Monkton and 
Stockton had separate postoffices, but owing to 
the small population and the proximity of the 
towns, the "High Monk-a-Monk' at Washington 
had decided to consolidate them. 

Their Congressman was at a loss which town to 
recommend, but finally suggested that the one 
showing the greater postage sale at the end of the 
official year should have the office. 

The decree had gone forth a month prior, and it 
now lacked but two days to the end of the term. 

He concluded by saying that both places were 
using their best endeavors to secure the prize, and 
that he had no doubt but Stockton would try to 
spring one of their low, snide games on them. 

"Is your rival pursuing your methods to obtain 
it?" I asked. 

"She air." 

"Have you any ideas as to the relative standing 
of the 'Twin Cities' regarding this matter?" 
"Which?" 
"Who's ahead?" 

"Don't know, stranger; Stockton's goin' to push 
us pooty close. She's got old Hobbs, and he's the 
richest man in these parts; why, mister, that old 
sinner draws a pension every three months of over 
$16. 

"Business hasn't been so peert of late," he pur- 
sued; "heaps of strangers used to light on this 
here town, but when they couldn't git no change 
'cept in stamps, they didn't stay long, and now 
they don't stop at all. A chap did stop over 
yesterday; he came nigh busting the postoffice, 
and had to telegraph for money to get home. 

"Carrots runs the ticket and telygraph office, and 
when the people telygraphed or bought tickets, he 
gave them their change in stamps, and then 
scooted with the cash up to the postoffice for more 
postage. 

"Carrots kept things a hummin' for a spell till 
he sent in his report to the railroad company; he 
didn't have no cash, so he sent 'em two cigar 
boxes full of two-cent postage stamps. The next 
day the general agent came down and wanted to 
know 'what the hell's struck this town!' Carrots 
came nigh losing his job, but we fixed it up all 
right and things went 'long jest lovely till the 
landlord, thar. gave the agent $7 change in postal 
cards, then he jest riz; yes, sir, he riz, and his 
pass was the only thing that got him out of the 
town. Things is slowed up a leetle since then. 

"Then the postoffice boss, he comes down, and 
wanted to know if we was trying to corner the 
stamp market; he went over the books and found 
both towns doin' things on the square. We tried 
the stamp racket on him, but the railroad agent 
must have , told him, for the mean ornery skunk 
didn't have anything bigger than silver quarters." 

I felt if I stayed over night, I would have to do 
some telegraphing myself, so I said "good-bye," 
and told them I would take the evening north- 
bound train. 

"Better stay and see it out," said the Mayor. 

I thought it best to go while I had a chance, and 
told him he could wire me the result. 

The Mayor, the committee and my landlord es- 
corted me to the station. As the illuminated Car- 
rots gave me my ticket, he said: 

"I'm sorry I ain't got no stamps, and the post- 
office is closed ('thank the Lord,' I murmured), so 
this is the best I can do." And he handed me my 
change, $4.50, in paper wraps. 

I thanked him for his consideration, whereupon 
he produced a flask and insisted I should drink to 
the success of their enterprise. 

I had just time to board the train which pulled 
out of the station 'mid the waving of hats and 
shouts of "Monkton and Prosperity!" 

About 12 o'clock, two nights after, my wife 
aroused me, saying there was some one ringing 
the doorbell. I looked out the window, and a 
voice said: "A telegram for you, sir." 

There was $2.70 charges, which I had to borrow 
from my wife, not having had time to realize on 
my postal-twos or Manila-ones. 

I turned up the light, and as my trembling wife 
looked over my shoulder, I read: 

"Sir — I have the honor to inform you that the 
enemy has won. We were not aware till the last 
moment that 'mail handled' would cut any figure. 
Old Hobbs blew in his pension for postal cards, 
and for two days and nights had all the galoots 
in Stockton writing to themselves— Carrots." 



Literary Gossip 

Conducted by^NgssGarner Cui-ra^n 

MR. JACK LONDON, the author of "The Son 
of the Wolf," published by Messrs. 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company is a 
young man, not yet twenty-four years old. His 
father was Pennsylvania-born, a soldier, scout, 
backwoodsman, trapper, and wanderer. His moth- 
er was born in Ohio. Both went West independ- 
ently, meeting and marrying in San Francisco 
where Mr. London was born. The pioneer spirit 
was strong in his ancestors, and the unrest of it 
seems to have descended to him. 

His early life was spent on California ranches 
but when he was nine years old the family re- 
moved to Oakland, California, where Mr. London 
still lives with his mother, his father having died 
a short time ago. 

There was an under world in the United States 
which Mr. London longed to explore, and by the 
time he was eighteen he had become possessed of 
an interest in sociology and economics. Swayed 
partly by this and partly by the fascination of the 
enterprise, he stepped down and out of the world, 
and was swallowed up in that strange region 
known as "the road." He took this step thor- 
oughly, living exactly as other tramps lived, and 
the long months he spent on the road bred in him 
a lifelong interest in the institutions of men from 
both an economic and an ethical standpoint. 

After this tramping expedition Mr. London re- 
turned to Oakland and applied himself to study. 
He had previously graduated from the Grammar 
School, and had read omnivorously. He now at- 
tended the High School for a year, stayed at home, 
and, without coaching, crammed the next two 
years into three months, took the entrance exam- 
inations, and entered the University of California 
at Berkeley. He was forced, much against his 
will, to give this up just prior to the completion 
of his Freshman year. 

More work followed, and then Mr. London went 
to the Klondike in the fall rush of 1897. He had 
a great variety of experiences there, but upon the 
death of his father he returned home. 

As to Mr. London's literary work, his first mag- 
azine article was published in January, 1899, in the 
"Overland Monthly," and is now the sixth story in 
"The Son of the Wolf." Since then he has done 
work for a large number of the best magazines and 
papers, besides a host of lesser publications, news- 
papers, and syndicates. 

jt j( jl 

"Winning Out," a new book designed especially 
for young people, by Dr. Orison Swett Marden, the 
editor of that successful magazine "Success," is 
now in press with Lothrop Publishing Company. 
To the boys and girls of America who are always 
responsive to inspiration and incentive, the title 
of Dr. Marden's book will certainly appeal. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Seton Thompson have just 
sailed for Europe, where they will pass the sum- 
mer. During his absence Mr. Thompson will gather 
material for some magazine articles dealing with 
animal life. Before he left he put the last touches 
on the proofs of a story of a coyote which he had 
written for "Scribner's Magazine," and on a play 
with animals for characters contributed to "The 
Ladies' Home Journal." During the last year and 
a half Mr. Thompson's work has made an astonish- 
ing leap into popularity. It has been widely read, 
both by young people and grownups. 

Omtmued /rum page 7 
Frank Bryson, Misses Zulu Baker, Roberta Mer- 
ritt, Grace Clark, Adeline N. Meek, Jessie Good- 
win, Grace Freeby, Blanche A. Kottmeir, Mrs. 
Kannon, Edward Quintan, Arthur M. Perry, A. J. 
Stamm, Ed. Kuster, A. Kottmeir, Ernest L. Bowen, 
Y. Escobar. 

One of the principal causes of the famine is 
the fact that a large portion of the land that could 
produce wheat and other sustaining food has been 
devoted by foreigners to the production of tea and 
indigo, which are shipped to other countries and 
which are of no benefit to the poorer classes ex- 
cept for the amount paid for labor. Meanwhile, 
the acreage devoted to food products is lessened 
every year and the famine districts and famine 
sufferers are becoming more numerous. The fam- 
ine is not the only enemy against which the people 
of India have to fight, but they also have to battle 
against disease which always follows in the wake 
of the famine. 

That most poetic of all instruments, the harp, 
was the one chosen by Miss Edith Bond some 
seven years ago upon which to study music. Un- 
der the tutelage of Mrs. J. M. Jones the young 
woman has reached a point where her playing 
bears every indication of a coming artist, and 
Mrs. Jones is amply justified in feeling a pride 
in the result of her pupil's work. Miss Bond has 
not as yet entered into an active professional life. 
J* v< .* 

EDITOR of the Graphic: I congratulate the 
Graphic and its musical critic; the latter 
' for his courage and independence in strik- 
ing a hearty, manly blow at the pernicious and 
puerile system of musical instruction in our public 
schools; and the former for Its public spirit in 
opening its valuable columns to the exposure of 
this more than evil excrescence which has fastened 
itself upon our educational organism. While indi- 



vidual effort cannot hope to eradicate quickly, or 
wholly, an evil so deeply rooted, yet constant ap- 
plication of vigorous body blows, well planted, will 
eventually awaken the public mind to a serious 
consideration of the harm being done, under the 
guise of free education. 

It is unfortunate that the question of music in 
our public schools cannot be submitted to the con- 
sideration of a selected number of capable and dis- 
interested vocal teachers, who alone are qualified 
by education and experience to determine so grave 
and important a matter. The evil, however, is 
with us and the wrong continues, and the sooner 
those who are at the head of our public institu- 
tions of learning are brought to a realizing sense 
of the fact, that the training of youthful voices in 
music is a delicate and serious undertaking, and 
not a toy, or plaything, the better it will be for 
musical endeavor and musical taste in our city; 
and better still, the saving from harm, perhaps 
ruin, of many bright young voices that have all 
the possibilities for success, if not fame, in the 
great world of music. 

The other phase of this subject, viz: "class 
standing," affords about as good an illustration of 
the carelessness, if not culpable ignorance, exer- 
cised in the adoption of the present system, as 
could very well be presented. What would these 
same gentlemen say to an applicant for the posi- 
tion of instructor in grammar who could not parse 
the simplest sentence in the English language? 
And yet there is not a moment's hesitancy in 
placing young voices under the care and training 
of teachers who have not acquired the first rudi- 
ments of music, or vocal instruction, and derate 
the pupil for failing to learn that which the teach- 
er is unable to impart. 

With hundreds of others of your readers, I shall 
be glad to see a few more hard blows struck in 
behalf of the young voices of our school children. 

Los Angeles, July 10, 1900. CITIZEN. 

E D U C A T I 0 N A L 

I Brownsberger 
Home School .... 

Shorthand and Typewriting 4 

903 South Broadway. Tel. White 487 1 > 

This institution owns the largest number ♦ 
of typewriters of any school in California s* 

X Touch method in typewriting exclusively. Horeposl- ?• 
^ tions are offered to the school at a good salary than 

we can fill. Only individual work. Office training. • 

Machine at home free. Hours !1 to 12; 1.30 to 4.30 .J 

I SPECIAL SUMHER RATES | 

212 W. Third St. Tel. Bl»ck 3651 

•» Oldest, largest and hest training school in the city. 

# Thorough, practical courses ot study in Bookkeeping, 
3f Shorthand, Typewriting and Telegraphy. College 
% trained and experienced teachers. Best equipped 
*f Business College room West ot Chicago. This is the 

# only school in the city that has the right of using the 
4f Budget of Voucher System of Bookkeeping. Come and 
■5* see it. Our students have the advantage of Spanish. 

* (ierman and Lou V. Chapin's Course of Lectures free. 
■* It will cost you nothing to Investigate the merits of 

* our school hefore going elsewhere. Special rates for 
: k the summer. Catalogue and full information on up- is- 
>fr plication. Address *■ 
J L. A. Business College, 212 W. Third St., I.. A. £ 

Los Angeles 



| Military Academy 

Begins its seventh year September 2. r )th. 
Classical, English and Scientific Courses. 
The sommon branches thoroughly taught. 
Prepares for business. 

Sanford A. Hooper, Head Master 
« Edward L Hardy, Associate 
Jj Catalogue mailed upon request. Visitors 
S take Westlake (First street) Traction cars. 

Los fliujeles School 
of DraniatiG Art . . . 



Incorporated Sept. 1H1I9 



Tel. James 711 



Training for tint I'latform, I'ulpit and Stage Cultivation of 
the Speaking Voice for every purpose. 

DlRKCTOKS-O. A. Doblnson, John 1). Hooker, W. C. Patter- 
son, B. K. Baumgardt, Sheldon Borden. 

The Art Building, 014 S. Hill Hi.. Lot Ang«l«t 

PHYSICIANS AM) SUBGKON8 



TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 



Hours— 10-13 a.m. 
2-4 p.m. 
Office Tel., Main 179 



306 308 WILCOX BITILDINO 
Res. Tel.. White G011 Kk.mii>kn<;k: Bit 8. UNION AVE 

D. CAVE 

LANKEKHIIIM BLOCK 
126 West Third Street 



Tel. Main 1516 



Puritas Root Beer 



The beverage that pleases the palate. The children's especial favorite 
pints^i^o. ICE & COLD STORAGE CO. Tel. Main 228 




HOTtL 

DELMOr* 



In every detail and in all its 
Envionment Ideally 
Californian 



A RACING AUTOMOBILE. 
Thert) is no longer any question about the practical kiiccchs of the automobile. It if 
firmly established in several countries, particularly the United .States and France. Steam, 
electricity and gasoline have taken the place of the horse to a considerable extent already, 
and it may he said that the revolution has hut begun. Generally speaking, the man of 
leisure was first to adopt the automobile, and it was to be expected that the sporting instinct 
would come to the fr-jnt and trials of speed become common occurrences between members 
of the automobility. France has its horseless carriage race almost daily, the contestants 
not necessarily always being Frenchmen. The illustration shows the auto racer of M. 
Levegh, of l'aris. This carriage recently covered a distance of 300 miles in 0 hours and 11 
minutes. This auto is built for speed and not for beauty. 




The Most riagnificent Hotel 

The Most Expansive Landscape ■ ki Ail 

The Most Varied Forests I IN ALL 
The Most Delightful Temperature * Jl/I C n» I A 

The Most Superb Flowers A /VI LK'vA 

One hundred and twenty-six acres of cultivated 
ground, and almost the whole of the Peninsula 
of /"lonterey for a playground 



Send for illustrated pamphlet to any agent 
or the Southern Pacific Company, 
of for special monthly rates, write 



W. A. JUNKER 

MANAGER 





^vUR MR. H. C. DILLON has just returned from our McKittrick 
Well and reports satisfactory progress. The diill will soon be drop- 
ping and our stock will then make another advance. He confirms 
strike of oil on sections 2-32 22, and says the great midway oil field 
between Sunset and McKittrick is being r.ipidly occupied with der- 
ricks and sure to be a great producer of high grade oil. 



Block of Shares at 12?cts* 



Will Soon be Exhausted 



J. S. DILLON 
H. C. DILLON 



President 
Secretary 



CURRIER BLOCK 
212 West Third Street aft *st 



S 



A. R. MAINES MFG. CO. 

435 S. Spring St., Los Angeles. 

Orient 
Bicvcles 



SIX riODELS 

if *r To Choose From 



Absolutely the Best Bicycle 
in the Market . . . 



Women's Pacific 




Coast Oil Co. 

I INCORPORATED 



Capital $300,000 
Stock 



Fully paid and Non-assessable 
Par Value $1.00 

An Open Letter to Our Stockholders 

SUMMERLAND, CAL., JULY 6, 1900. 

Women's Pacific Coast Oil Co., Lou Angeles, Cat. 

I.adiks:— Contract for Hickey & Robinson received and delivered. 1 nave to report 
that work is begun on the derrick, and that the drillers expect to be able to begin drill- 
ing next Tuesday. It will be necessary for you to buy and ship the 7% casing at once. 
I presume the best that can be done with he notice given will be to get it started on 
the freight Monday. I told them I would write to you today, ordering you to ship it, 
and that seemed to be satisfactory to them. I am very sincerely yours, 

DWIOHT KEMPTON. 



334 Copp Building, 218 S. Broadway 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



I'll fin i- .lf.hn 1 1 SI 



GEO. RICE & SONS. (Inc.) LOS ANGELES. 



WESTERN 
GRAPHIC 

<JIn Illustrated Family Weekly of the Sovithwest 

W I T 11 WHICH 18 CONSOLIDATED THE LOS A N ti E L E S S V N 1) A Y \V () U L D A N I) ( A I. I K (> K N 1 A (' U K ! «l 

lx xv,,, |No. 3. Los Angeles, Saturday, July 21, 1900. Price 10 Cents 



r 





Notebook and Camera 

v^v^ Personalities and Happenings ^ 



WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

Illustrated Family Weekly of the Southwest 

WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED THE 

SUNDAY WORLD and CALIFORNIA CURIO 



0E0. RICE & SONS, (Inc.) 

pobli.'hed every 8atvrday morning at ■ 
811-313 New High Street Telephone Main 1053 

INTBMD AT T Ml LOS ANGELES POST OFFICE AS SECOND-CLASS MATTER 

SUBSCRIPTIONS— Three Dollars a Year; or, Twenty-five cents 
a month , collected by Remittance Card system, all postage paid 
by the publishers. 

CONTRIBU1 /OAS—ll'e pay cash for accepted contributions, 
those containing- photographs for reproduction being most avail- 
able. The usual rules regarding manuscripts should be observed 
to insure consideration. 

T5/>e Editor's Say 

THE horrible stories of the fiendish atroci- 
ties of the American Indians of a hundred 
years ago are brought fresh to mind in 
the confirmatory details of the awful tragedies at 
Poking. That the days of terrible wars are over 
has indeed been an optimistic dream, and it is 
not pessimistic to venture that we have exper- 
ienced the first thrill of the greatest war of the 
century, in which the most savage and vicious in- . 
stincts possible in human beings are to have full 
sway. The full knowledge of the pitiful fate of 
the massacred ministers and their wives and chil- 
dren is enough to drive the civilized nations of 
the world to extreme reprisals, and while the posi- 
tion of the United. States is on the conservative 
ground of simple protection of our interests, the 
other powers interested may be expected to de- 
mand large areas of the Chinese empire in pay- 
ment for indignities and damages. As was ex- 
pressed in the Graphic some months since, it is 
still of the opinion that the new century will dawn 
upon the dismemberment of China. 

jt jt Jt 

There is some small consolation in the news 
that the women and children of the ill-fated lega- 
tions at Peking died either at the hands of their 
own countrymen or by self-administered poison. 
The picture of the heartrending scenes when it 
became necessary to place the women beyond the 
reach of the hordes of fanatical Boxers is one 
that is new to the present generation. It is stupe- 
fving in intensity. 

Jt jt jt 

News of one victory for the allied forces in 
China in the early part of the week shot the mer- 
cury of public feelings above the zero mark, obvi- 
ating any immediate danger of mob violence upon 
the Chinese residents of this country. It cannot 
be impressed too strongly upon those men who 
might become inflamed by news of. Chinese 
atrocities to the point of lawlessness, that it is the 
bounden duty of the United States to protect the 
Chinese within our borders in any extremity, and 
that the hand of the law will fall hard upon the 
leaders of any movement to wreak revenge for the 
villianies of the Boxers. Such an act would bring 
the actors to n level with the Apache Indian. 
jt jt ■< 

Warnings are now sent out from Nome against 
any further influx of fortune seekers to that deso- 
late spot, inasmuch as the surplus of population 
there threatens the most dire consequences. These 
warnings will be heeded no more than when 
sounded against a continued emigration to the 
Klondike country. The transportation companies 
are ready to carry anyone with the price of the 
nassage. and there are many people who expect 
to succeed where all others have failed. The re- 
peatedly given advice is particularly good in this 
instance, for no one ought to venture to the Cape 
unless possessed of ample means to pay his pas- 
sage back to the States. For anyone to disregard 
this advice will be a matter of life and death as 
the conditions on the Nome beach exist today. 

Thousands are there today without any means 
of support and no funds to pay their passage home. 
No chance to earn any money is to be found there 
for such large numbers, and for every place made 
vacant by death there are twenty applicants. The 
gold deposits are evidently not so bounteous as 
they were reported to be, nor so extensive. Gold 
digging is the only industry there, and there is 
nothing else for thousands of miles around. Be- 
sides, the country is bare of vegetation, there be- 
ing only about ten weeks in the year when any- 
thing will grow. All food except fish has to be 
imported. Now. what will those many thousands 
do that are at the Cape today without means to 
get away from it? It will not be surprising if 
General Randall, who is in command of that mili- 
tary district, should make a requisition for gov- 
ernment transports for the purpose of deporting 
the superfluous population of the Cape district di- 
rect back to the States in order to prevent crime 
and starvation becoming general on the approach 
of winter. 

jt Jt Jt 

The Graphic is pleased to acknowledge the 
courtesy of the Ix>s Angeles Herald for the use 
of the engraving of Mrs. Brandeis on the first page. 



LAST Saturday evening as the Democratic 
red fire wagon and brass band wended its 
way up Spring street, a well-known Re- 
publican of unquestioned loyalty to his party 
braced himself against the invigorating evening 
breeze, and with an energy denoting large lungs 
and a powerful diaphragm, gave vent to a roaring, 
reveberating Tammany war-whoop. A quietly dis- 
posed friend passed at the moment and remarked 
that while it surprised him to see a solid citizen 
yelling in such an unseemly manner, it really 
pained him to note that a VJnion League man had 
so far forgotten himself as to give moral assist- 




ing. JOSEPH n. LYNCH 

ance to the enemy. The vigorous whooper turned 
upon his friend and replied, "Well, sir, I consider 
this parade a disgrace to the city, and propose 
helping it out when it needs it." 

At _< ,4 

The principal object of attention in the local 
newspaper world just now is the possibility of a 
Democratic daily. The presence of Hon. Jos. D. 
Lynch in the city naturally causes town talk on 
the subject to revolve about this well-known Dem- 
ocratic writer as tne prospective editor of the new 
paper, whatever its origin. A man of erudition 
and remarkable prescience, a virile and logical 
writer, no more capable person could be selected 
for the direction of a journal for the Democracy 
than Mr. Lynch. With the various projects under 
consideration, it is impossible to foretell what the 
outcome will be, but it is certain that the Bryan 
party will be represented in the fourth estate of 
Los Angeles, and reasonably sure that the direc- 
tion of the editorial policy will be by the master 
hand of Mr. Lynch. 

< 4 Jt 

Through the enterprise of the big newsgather- 
ing association of the United States, we are privi- 
leged to hear that at a regatta on the Atlantic- 
coast "Mrs. Vanderbilt wore a natty yachting cos- 
tume and looked charming throughout the race." 
l< Jt Jt 

In the fullness of its generosity, with superb 
magnanimity, and in a broad spirit of fraternity, 
The Times welcomes its new contemporary in the 
Republican field, with the following "local:" "The 
Los Angeles Herald announces the sale of the 
paper and its property to a new corporation, of 
which Wallace L. Hardison is president and gen- 
eral manager; Horace G. James, manager: Guy L. 
Hardison. vice-president and secretary; W. Benja- 
min Scott, treasurer." 

Jt -.4 -."* 

The young men will doubtless be a unit for the 
nomination of Justice Win. P. James for the short 
term superior judgeship on the Republican county 
ticket. Men to whom the vigor of youth often 
suggests insufficient maturity for so important an 
office may sieze upon this only available point 
against Mr. James' candidacy ,but it is only neces- 
sary to refer to the nomination and election of 
the late Judge Clark at twenty-seven, whose abil- 
ity and judicial prescience was never questioned 
from his first decision. In age Mr. James has an 
advantage, as he will have turned thirty-one at 



the beginning of the term to which he aspires. 
Then his four years' service in the district attor- 
ney's office and two years as township justice, and 
a naturally studious disposition give him an 
equipment superior to many of the candidates for 
the various judgeships. 

It seems the city council is in no mood to 
tackle the question of telephone tariffs, with the 
view of at least causing the Sunset company to 
improve the service to a point somewhere near 
what the public pays for. The telephone is now 
classed by the business men of Los Angeles among 
the necessary evils, but if it becomes much worse 
as a utility there will surely be a revolt against 
'he abomination. 

We have had a rest from the daily resume of 
the doings of Guy Barham, until one day this 
week, when Otheman Stevens, who is now enjoy- 
ing the unutterable pleasure of milking the public 
cow in a state office, sent a letter to one of the 
dailies. Otheman admits, with naive humor, that 
it is hard for him to write a column without re- 
ferring to that picturesque guy (small g), who evi- 
dently expects to become historical as a man 
whose principal aim in life was to make an un- 
blushing spectacle of himself. But it is a harmless 
sort of occupation, and with plenty of money in 
the pocket can be indulged in regardless of public- 
opinion. 

Jt .< Jt 

It would seem that H. G. Wilshire would begin 
to realize that he was about squelched. Three 
courts of justice have frowned upon his attempt 
to openly violate the city ordinance regulating the 
height of bill boards. A cheerful compliance with 
the laws of the municipality promptly upon their 
enactment would have secured for Mr. Garlord a 
much better opinion in the public mind and greater 
leniency at the hands of the city fathers; and a 
chance for a revised ordinance on a compromis- 
ing basis. As he has chosen to defy the acts of the 
council he should be shown no mercy, and the 
letter of the law should be enforced to the end. 
(,5-5 

They were sitting on the sands at Santa Monica 
watching the bathers. 

As one shapely damsel in an abbreviated suit 
paced the stretch of beach from the bath house to 
the water. Mr. Prude remarked: 

"That woman reminds me of the salad I had for 
lunch." 

"Nice and fresh. I suppose," said Mrs. Prude. 
No, half-dressed." 

jt jt Jt 

The collapse of Mr. Alex. B. Bush on the floor 
of the Los Angeles Oil Exchange last Wednesday 
morning was a dramatic and painful episode. 
While in the excitement of a fierce bearing of 
Southern Consolidated stock the young operator 




ALEXANDER B. BUSH 

fell senseless into the arms of Broker Young, and 
was later removed to the Good Samaritan hospital, 
where he is likely to remain for some weeks. The 



Western Graphic 



3 



cause of his collapse was heart failure, brought 
about by over work. In view of the general in- 
terest taken in Mr. Bush the Graphic reproduces a 
snapshot taken of him a few weeks ago at the 
commencement of his brilliant career on 'change. 

The Alhambra Advocate notes the improvement in 
the Graphic in the following felicitous pragaraph: 
"We thought the Western Graphic made a mis- 
take in changing the style of heading, but it 
seems the Messrs. Rice & Sons knew what they 
were about. Harper's Weekly, after running the 
same heading for over forty years, changed last 
week to the same style and similar letter used by 
the Western Graphic. Thus does Los Angeles 
lead the New York publications in advanced 
typography. * 
J* -i* 

Billy Foote, an alleged Paris commissioner, 
writes about himself to the Call from the French 
capital and says: "It costs you $4 to wink your 
eye and $6 for a drink. With your capacities you 
could easily spend $1000 a day and be economical. 
When I go out alone I invariably get lost. I can't 
tell a hackman where I want to go or what my 
name is, and I am in permanent danger of being 
put in a lunatic asylum. If you were to hear that 
I am in such a place put it down as absolutely 
true." There can be no doubt but one of the 

A Race for 

By J o s e p 

MONKTON was a western village, built in a 
miasmatic wood, about a mile from a 
small railroad station. Back of it, divided 
by a swamp, was Stockton, where the wood was 
not so dense, but miasma more prolific. 

A great rivalry existed between the "twin cities" 
from their first settlement. Monkton boasted the 
first grave-yard. To "get even," the Stocktonians, 
aided by their mayor and constable, inveigled a 
negro into stealing a hog. The next day, Stock- 
ton looked with pride on its own "plant." 
Studying day and night how one could get ahead 



of the other, both towns guarded jealously and 
secretly their respective enterprises. 

The railroad station was used in common, but. 
rather than go through Monkton, the Stocktonians 
built a corduroy road through the marshes, east 
of their rivals, with planks on either side for foot 
passengers. 

When the schoolhouse was needed, both towns 
made their claims for the building. Stockton of- 
fered the stone, and sent the commissioners a keg 
of brandy. Monkton put in its bid with a gift of 
the lumber, and threw in a half barrel of apple- 



alleged Paris commissioners winks at those places 
it costs him $6 for a drink come to at least $4 a 
wink. And after many such winks and drinks it 
is not at all strange that the winker and drinker 
"invariably gets lost." And there is no doubt but 
what the proper place for such a person is a lunatic 
asylum. No man of good reasoning faculties, who 
has been lately a victim of many household griefs, 
would write so disgracefully of himself. The only 
sorrow that we anticipate is that the French Ex- 
amining Board may not get hold of this alleged 
commissioner, and that he will return again to his 
own native land. 

< ■ < J* 

If any one should say to you, "there comes 
George Ebey," don't look. A Walapi Indian or 
South African Hottentot would not be more shock- 
ing. For somebody stole his clothes from the dress- 
ing-room at the Los Angeles Athletic Club while 
George was engaged in adding a few inches to his 
biceps in the gymnasium. It was a mean trick, 
especially considering the fact that Ebey is a 
newspaper man, and is therefore not supposed to 
own more than one suit of clothes anyway. Mr. 
Ebey holds down several different pencil-pushing 
jobs in Los Angeles, and also finds time to send a 
feature to some of the big dailies of other cities 
occasionally. But he is best known as the press 
agent of the Orpheum. 

Shoolhouse 

a \i g K e r 

jack. Each succeeding day increased the induce- 
ments, until both towns "went dry." 

After due consideration, the commissioners de- 
cided to award the schoolhouse to the town show- 
ing the greater population, according to the forth- 
coming United States census. 

Both towns completed a thorough canvass the 
day prior to the official count, with the following 
startling result: 

MONKTON 437 

STOCKTON 437 



The excitement was intense, but there was an 
under-current foretelling victory for Monkton. 

Groups of men, women, and half-grown boys 
congregated here and there, talking in whispers as 
I approached, or were silent until I passed out of 
hearing. Strangers were looketl upon with sus- 
picion. My many visits to Monkton's hostelry had 
won my landlord's confidence a little, but only a 
little. 

"In spite of the tie," I said to him, "Monkton 
seems sure of the schoolhouse. But what is all 
this mystery about?" 



"Hush:" he whispered, taking my arm. "Come 
with me to Carrots'." 

On our way we passed piles of barrels, boxes 
and brushwood ready for the match. Eight or ten 
strangers lounged about the tavern. 

"The band. Jest arrived," said mine host, an- 
swering my inquiring look. 

"What in the world " I began, laughing. 

"Hist!" he interrupted me, as a wagon-load of 
boxes approached. 

"Fire-works," he said, under his breath, when 
the wagon had passed. 

Following close, an ox cart jogged along, laden 
with barrels and kegs. 

"Rum," he continued, laconically. "Commis- 
sioners got all that was in the deestrict." 

"No freight for Stockton?" I cautiously inquired. 

"Nop. 'Less it's a coffin. Old Hobbs ought to 
be dead by this time, but it's jest like them ga- 
loots over thar to keep him alive till the census 
is took. O, you don't know the meanness of them 
varmints," he continued with a look of utter dis- 
gust. 

By this time we had arrived at 'Carrots,' — the 
telegraph office — where we found a score of men 
around the operator, a youth with a very red 
head and nose, who was "guying" his neighbor at 
Stockton over the wire. 

"Wot's he sayin', 'Carrots'?" asked my landlord, 
entering the room. 

"He's jest been sayin' he'd stay with us all 
night, if need be," replied the youth, taking a 
drink from a handy jug. 

"We'll soon send him home sick," laughed one 
of the men. 

"He says," continued 'Carrots', wiping his mouth 
on his sleeve, as he finished jotting down the 
message, "that if it weren't for improving our 
grave-yard plant, they'd come over and rid the 
county of some of its varmints." 

"Carrots" closed the key and took another 
drink. 

Although the men laughed derisively, I could 
see the tension was almost unbearable. One of 
them was stationed at a window, where every now 
and then he peered out through the darkness and 
then made a negative sign to the expectant crowd 
within. 

"Carrots" was about to take another drink, when 
a mighty shout suddenly went up from without. 

Twenty bon fires lightened the sky, and, amid the 
reports of guns, pistols and fireworks, and the din 
of the imported band, the mayor of the ' town 
rushed breathlessly in. 

"Gentlemen!" he cried, vainly attempting to 
control his excitement. "I'm deputized by Mr. Bill 
Plunkett, who is too full to speak for himself, to 
say, not only in my official capacity, but as a 
friend and fellow-citizen, that Mrs. Plunkett's 
doin' fust-rate. It's a gal!" 

The secret was out. The men threw up their 
hats and answered the yells of the crowd outside. 
Their joy was infectious, and I gave a ball-game 
rooter's yell in sympathy. From that moment I 
was one of them. 

After toasting the "Metropolis"— "Carrots" do- 
ing so several times during the excitement — the 
Mayor said: 

"Tick the news to Stockton! Give it to 'em. 
Carrots!' Give it to 'em hot!" 

Whereupon the youth wired his neighbors that 
Monkton's population had just been increased to 
438. 

After waiting some time for a reply. "Carrots" 
taking a drink or two during the lull, I noticed, 
the Mayor shouted: 

"Give it to 'em agin, 'Carrots'! Give it to 'em 
agin!" 

The message was repeated many times, regard- 
less of the unanswered attention calls, but met 
with no better result. 

"Wot's the matter with the darned skunk? Is 
he dead?" the men were bawling, with patience 
exhausted. 

"Try him once more, 'Carrots'!" urged the May- 
or. 

"Oh! it ain't no use," the operator mumbled, 
with an expression of infinite weariness and scorn. 
"It ain't no use. He's gone home, dead beat. 
We've got the schoolhouse — and I think I'll take 
a snifter." 

He was about to raise the jug when the sounder 
rattled off in a lively manner. Reluctantly releas- 
ing the vessel, he staggered over to his desk. 

"Wot's he sayin' now?" yelled the men, as they 
gathered around him. 

We watched "Carrots" as he wrote, and waited 
until he had taken down the last word. As he 
did his jaw fell, his eyes protruded, and, yelling 
"Hellen Blazes!" he leaped, without taking a 
drink, through the open window. 

"He's got 'em again!" laughed the mayor, as he 
took up the message "Carrots" had just received, 
and read it aloud: 

"Mr. Tom Rusher says stop that damned racket 
over thar. Mrs. Rusher ain't feelin' very peart to- 
night. It's TWINS!" 

(Copyrighted, 1900, Wm. R. Miller.) 



Auctioneers are always of a mor-bid disposition. 
Lawyers and doctors usually profit by their own 
advice. 

It Is easier to think you will get up early in the 
morning than it is to do it. 



h B 




I 



Literary Gossip 

Conducted by^C^^Garner Curra.n 

IN these days when all eyes are turned to- 
ward the Orient no book could be more 
timely than "China; the Long-Lived Em- 
pire," by Elizabeth R. Seidmore. daughter of a 
former United States Consul-General to Japan, and 
author of "Jinrikisha Days in Japan" and "Java; 
the Garden of the East." The volume is brought 
out by the Century Company of New York, with 
many fine illustrations by Harry Fenn from photo- 
graphs, and is sold at $2.50. It is not a "pot-boil- 
er" prepared in haste to take advantage of the 
crisis in China, but a carefully written work which 
the publishers have had in hand for some time and 
which they did not intend to bring out until next 
fall. Miss Seidmore is certainly competent to 
write of China, for she has made seven visits to 
the country within the last fifteen years. What 
makes the book of special interest is that it de- 
votes so much space to the cities of North China — 
Tien-tsin and Peking, which are now the centers 
of the Boxer trouble. 

jt & ,-t 

William Sage is the youngest son of Mrs. Abby 
Sage Richardson, who is known as a writer of 
works on American history and English litera- 
ture. 

Mr. Sage descends from a long line of Massachu- 
setts and Connecticut ancestors, but was born in 
the State of New Hampshire. When about twelve 
years old he was sent to the "Gunnery," a school 
first made famous, many years ago, by one of Dr. 
Holland's novels. From there he went to France 
as a schoolboy, and afterwards to Stuttgart, Ger- 
many, where he finished his education. On his 
return to America he began a business life, enter- 
ing as a clerk the banking house of Baring, Ma- 
goun & Co., New York City, where he remained 
several years; but his health failing, he went again 
to Europe, and on his return attempted literary 
work. 

He first wrote short stories and sketches, some 
of which were published in "Short Stories" and 
the "New York Ledger." But he shortly began to 
entertain the idea of writing a novel. His interest 
in history, especially in American and French his- 
tory, has always been very great, and his knowl- 
edge of and interest in the localities and the inci- 
dents of the French Revolution very naturally 
furnished him with suggestion. 

"Robert Tournay," just published by Messrs. 
Houghton, Mifflin and Company, was the result of 
this interest. Although the story is in no respect 
historical, the Revolution furnishes the back- 
ground for the story, and the characters are such 
as might have existed in the social order of 1789 
to 1796. 

,1 ,•* j* 

"Memory Street: A Story of Life," by Martha 
Baker Dunn, is a simple story in the form of a per- 
sonal narrative of a bright New England girl, be- 
ginning when she is romping through the fields in 
short skirts, and ending with her marriage. It 
concludes with these modest words: "This is a 
simple story that I have told, but it is a story of 
life. It has no plot, except as a plot may be lived 
from day to day. People come and go in it as they 
come and go in real life, and the stage of its action 
is the stage of the world. Much is missed out of 
it that could have been better written by a strong- 
er hand, and its only meaning — if it has one — is 
the attempt to find out God's meaning." A com- 
ment more just could not have been written by a 
disinterested critic; but the latter would have 
added — what it would not have looked well for 
the author to say — that the story is charming in 
its simplicity, and full of human nature, tempered 
by the restraints of morality. (Boston: L. C. 
Page & Co.) 

t$ 

"Railway Development in China," by William 
Barclay Parsons, chief engineer of the American- 
China Development Company in the July Mc- 
Clure's, is of especial interest at this time because 
of the light thrown on the rivalry of the Euro- 
pean powers, and on the political as opposed to 
the purely commercial aspects of China's railway 
development. 

< <* 

The first edition of Mr. Allen's new novel, "The 
Reign of Law," was upward of 40,000 and was sold 
before the day of publication. It is likely to be 
of interest to collectors of first editions of Mr. Al- 
len's works, as the drawings by Harry Fenn and 
J. E. Earl, which are reproduced in photogravure, 
will hereafter be made by a half-tone process. A 
second edition of 10,000 copies was printed July 
5th. 

,«« j/t 

The Century Company announces the discovery 
of a new romantic novelist in a young New Yorker, 
Miss Bertha Runkle, whose maiden effort is to be 
the Century's leading piece of fiction for the next 
eight months, beginning in the August number. It 
is described as a dramatic romance of love and 
adventure, and is entitled "The Helmet of Na- 
varre." The scene is Paris during the siege by 
Henry of Navarre, and the story is full of vigorous 
action, and the plot one of great interest. 

No girl appreciates a lover who is unable to 
hold his own. 




Under the Derricks 



T I'DGE ROSS' scripper decision continues to in- 
I terest oil men. While the question may have 
J been decided strictly according to law, it is 
made upon a technical construction of the statute. 
To a man not especially versed in the law. it would 
seem that the decision leans too strongly in favor 
of persons holding lieu scrip. It was undoubtedly 
the intention of the government to give holders 
of land in government reserves the right to trans- 
fer their holdings to other government lands, but 
the law as now construed gives him the power to 
disturb and dispossess other people who have ac- 
quired incohoate rights under the mining laws. 
Undoubtedly the scripper should be protected in 
his rights when he has located his scrip upon 



it practically impossible for a placer claimant to 
perfect a title without the expenditure of thou- 
sands of dollars, which the law does not contem- 
plate. In locating quartz claims, it is true, the 
locator must discover mineral in the quartz, but 
the law is silent as to the amount of gold neces- 
sary to hold the claim.- his affidavit is taken as 
to this fact, and he is given in some instances two 
years to do development work to prove his claim. 
With the oil locator a similar rule should be 
adopted, for the discovery of oil seepage, brea, oil 
sand and shale upon the land is as sure an indica- 
tion of oil as is the finding quartz which carries 
an infinitesimal trace of mineral. The injustice of 
the ruling is in the fact that it allows the scripper 



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Men Who Have Made the Oil Industry 



2-L. G. PARKER 




Mr. fiC Grand Parker has been prominently identified with the oil interests of .Southern 
California since its first discovery within the limits of Los Angeles, just at the time of his 
arrival in this city seven years ago. From the first he has taken a very active part in its 
development, and is today recognized as one of the leaders in the southern fields. He 
recently incorporated all his local personal interests into the Parker Oil Company, with 
forty-five producing wells scattered all over the Los Angeles field from Puena Vista street 
to the extreme western end. Mr. Parker is also president of the Coast Range Oil Company, 
the original company operating in the Coalinga field; of the Del Monte Oil Company in 
the McKittrick district: of the Wellington, the I'arker and Morrell and others. Previous 
to coming to this coast, Mr. Parker was for twenty-five years connected with the United 
States Express Company, the last fifteen of which he was their agent in Milwaukee. Per- 
sonally he is an educated, refined gentleman, of the genial, hale-fellow type, broad in his 
views and possessing a backbone that has been frequently evident during the present 
stormy term of the Police Commission, of which he is a member, this being the only polit- 
ical position he has ever held. Mr. Parker has recently been mentioned as the Democratic 
nominee for Mayor of Los Angeles, and he undoubtedly possesses the requisites for an 
ideal executive. 



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land still held by the government, but in a case 
where a placer claim has been located in good faith 
and the locator has set in motion the legal ma- 
chinery whereby he can perfect his title it cer- 
tainly is not right to allow another to dispossess 
him before he has a chance to do so. They both 
stand equal before the law. The scripper is not 
compelled to take his scrip for his first location, 
and he should not be given any advantage be- 
cause of this transfer of his title. The ruling that 
oil can only be discovered by actual drilling makes 



to watch the placer claimant while he is doing the 
assessment work, and at the last moment when in- 
dications point to a successful search for oil, but 
before it is discovered in paying quantities which 
the court require, the scripper can step in and 
succeed to all that his money and labor has done 
toward the development of the property. This 
seems to be a violation of the principles of equity. 

It is stated that the amount of lieu scrip which 
is issued is very small. This may be true, but 
there is yet a large amount of land held in the 



Western Graphic 



5 



government reserves throughout the country upon 
which scrip can be demanded, and these additions 
to the volume of scrip out will probably be 
enough to cover all the oil land where placer 
claims have been located outside of such reserva- 
tions. Locations within government reservations 
are in better shape than those outside, for they 
are not subject to location by scrip. The only 
safe way for oil men is to cover their land by 
scrip before beginning development work. 
J| ,4 3 

Reports come from Colusa county of great pros- 
pective oil development. Oil men have for some 
time been making investigations in regard to re- 
ports which have come from that section of oil 
production, and the result has been that many are 
convinced that the county is rich in petroleum of 
a very high gravity. Within the past few months 
a number of oil men have become interested in 
leases of oil land in that county, "among the first 
in the field being R. H. Herron and associates. 
Later George Rice & Sons acquired a lease on 
about 10.000 acres of land which is said to give 
promise of being good oil territory. The quality 
of the oil is said to more nearly approach that 
of Eastern oil than in anv other localitv in the 
State. 

.4 JH 

The variations of the price of oil stock on the 
Los Angeles oil exchanges are something which 
puzzle the most acute manipulators of stocks. The 
prices run up or down without any apparent rea- 
son, and often in such an eccentric manner^that 
there is reason to believe that a large portion of 
the transactions are wash sales between brokers. 
During the past two or three weeks many of the 
best stocks in the market, stocks which have an 
assured value and are paying large dividends reg- 
ularly, have been hammered down without reason 
apparently for the purpose of casting discredit up- 
on companies that have in some manner incurred 
the enmity of the brokers. The senseless and 
vicious fight between the two exchanges is re- 
sponsible for a large portion of the raid, but what- 
ever the cause it is having a bad effect upon the 
oil industry. 

* Jt < 

As an illustration of how stocks go up and down 
without any apparent reason the quotations and 
sales of the Southern Consolidated on Friday and 
Saturday of last week may be mentioned. On Fri- 
day all stocks were dull and the Southern Con- 
solidated bid at 30 cents. On Saturday on one ex- 
change a few shares sold at 30. a few more at 32. 
and 1100 at 32 l 2 . At the same time on the other 
exchange the stock opened at 32 and kept going up 
until 37.800 shares were sold, the last transaction 
being 6000 shares at 35. Nothing had occurred in 
the meantime to advance the price of the stock, 
yet the brokers fell over themselves in order to 
get a stock at 35 which the day before was only 
regarded as worth 30. The stock in question has 
real value at the higher price, but had been ham- 
mered down, and as soon as the reaction began the 
wiley brokers outwinded themselves trying to buy 
it as it went up. Many other stocks have had 
similar experiences, and people are beginning to 
see that the only safe course to pursue where in- 
vestments are made to hold is to disregard ex- 
change quotations and buy upon their own judg- 
ment of the value of the stocks. 

,«t ._•» .< 

A Los Angeles oil company has an *'ad" in one 
of the daily papers which is susceptible of two 
constructions. It says: "At present rate of pro- 
gress we shall very soon be through with drill- 
ing." which may be construed to mean that they 
will then have struck oil. or that they have a 
drv hole and are financiallv upon their backs. 
JC Jl 

For some months past there has been a ten- 
dency among oil men to obtain property in the 
central part of the state, on the theory that oil 
deposits were richer there than on this side of 
the Tehachapi or further up the coast in Ventura 
and Santa Barbara counties. There is no disput- 
ing the fact that the surface indications of oil in 
those districts are very pronounced, and that it 
is a region of great oil production, judged from 
its geological formations, the region south and 
east of Los Angeles possesses unsurpassed de- 
posits of oil. which, as it is being more carefully 
experted by competent men, is being regarded 
as one of the very best oil regions in the world. 
During the past week M. M. Ogden. the oil expert 
of the San Francisco Producers' Oil Exchange, 
has been in town, making his headquarters at the 
Van Xuys. He has made the various oil fields of 
the state a close study, and while here declared 
that the territory lying between Los Angeles and 
the Mexican border will eventually prove the rich- 
est petroleum field in the state. He bases this 
statement upon the geological features of the Ful- 
lerton field, and the new oil territory which has 
been discovered to the east and south of that lo- 
cality. In an interview with a Herald reporter he 
said: 

"Southern California is wonderfully rich in the 
fossilerifous remains of prehistoric animals. This 
statement is not in reference to the smaller spe- 
cies of the cretaceous period of cenozoic time, 
such as the mollusks. but concerns the gigantic 
sharks and the enormous mammals that once 
made their habitat on the globe, back in the dim 
and distant periods of geological time. As a 



MARINE OIL COMPANY 1 



S. W. KNAPP, 

President and ticn. Mqr. 



OF SUMMERLAND 

Capital $300,000.00 
140,000 In Treasury 



H. D. LOMBARD 

Secretary and Treas. 



Offers subject to previous sale 10,000 shares at 35 cents per share on which price we 
are earning large returns. 25,000 shares sold between May 17th 
and May 30th. After the present issue of 10,000 shares has been 
taken the price will be advanced. 

We Own 32 Producing Wells and Territory for 60 More 

We are not hunting for oil, but we have oil in sufficient quantities 
to earn large returns on the present selling price of stock 



Call or send 
for Prospectus 



Marine Oil Company... 



432 Bvrne Building 
Los Angeles 



OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS 

LOUIS SHIVELY. President I. E. TUTT, Secretary and Treasurer 

JOHN O. MILLER, Vice-President. Bakersfield TELEPHONE GENERAL JOHNSTONE JONES, Attorney 

E. S. TUTT, General Manager JOHN T. C. MILLER. Bakersfield 



A. SHIVELY 



1601 



Sunset Diamond Oil Company 

INCORPORATED LNDER THE LAWS OF ARIZONA 
Pgr value Of Stock il.OO 'S Will begin drilling their first well on section 13 within SOO yards of Jew. ft & 

7 /' Blodgrtt's famous gunhrr, well IT in the Sunset District. A valuable lesse ha« 

Present Price 25 cts : : : -J been j-erured on -10 acres in the immediate vicinity of Jewett <t Blodgelt's refinery and 
A the terminus of the new Sunset Railroad. This insures cheap aDd easy transportation. 

Make remittance payable to the Secretary. Office, 426 Byrne Building 




"Little Money Works Wonders" 



The " SUXSET KING" offers to all classes of investors 
the greatest fortune-njakiDg prospects of the past fifty years. 
Its location, small capitalization, and brilliant leadership 
recommend it to the most conservative investors. 

SUNSEJ KING OIL GO. 

320-322 Laughlin Building 



etJiingOHCo. - - 



■^•^•^•^•"^•'^•^■'^•^•^•^•'^ §^ c^=>^=^ t=^i=3^^ g^jS^S^ ^Sxjg^S^. • 

j0 ^^7^2? ?i=7?57f?7 ^S^B^v? 

F. H. Dvsham, Pres. Franklin Refining Co., President 

F. L. Hossack. Secretary. 

Hercules Oil Producing Company 

Are now drilling on their Kern River lands: also drilling in the Los 
Angeles field. The Company has valuable oil lauds in Coal intra. Kern 
River, Ventura. Newhall and Los Angeles fields 

REFINERY 

The Company has begun work on the largest oil refinery on the coast. 
The earning power of this plant will be equal to the value of the produc- 
tion from several oil wellt of 100 barrels capacity each per day. This 
in«nres good dividends. "Hercules" stock i« worth owning and is worth 
holding as a permanent investment. It will increase rapidly in val.ie. 

Rooms 230 = 231 Douglas Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 





M Absolutely 
Sale Investment 



ft Mine, not a ProsDect 

The property consists of the Lo-.t 
Horse, Ix>st Horse Extension, and 
People's Party Claims, each claim 
being 600 by 1500 feet in area, situated 
in Riverside County, Cal. 

The books of the mine show that 
about 3000 tons have been mined, and 
milled, with an average result of $27 
per ton. 

Shares now 25 Gents 



Imperial State Mining and Milling Co. 

OFFICERS 

B. Frank Hand President 

S. M. KELSEY Vice-President 

O. S. Williams Secretary 

C. H. Schirmer Treasurer 

U. S. G. Toed General Manager 

S. M. Kelsey Superintendent 

B. Frank Hand . Consulting Engineer 



10-Stamr Mill 



Imperial State Mining and Milling Co. 

Capital $1,000,000 -fully paid— non-assessable 

605 Lauahlin Building .... Los ftnrjeles 



6 



Western Graphic 



Absolute 
Guarantee 
Against Loss 

THE OROANIZERS 
OF THE 

OPHIR 

OIL COMPANY 



Have arranged with the California 
Safe Deposit and Trust Company of 
San Francisco, to hold sufficient secur- 
ities in trust for the purchasers of 
Ophir Oil stock to 

Insure Holders of this Stock 
Against Loss .... 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Com- 
pany shall fail to produce oil in pay- 
ing- quantities sufficient to bring its 
stock to par value ( one dollar per 
share), purchasers will receive back, 
with accrued interest, the entire 
amount paid in by them for stock. 

The securities thus held in trust are 
adequate, and an investment in Ophir 
Oil Stock is as secure as a United 
States Government Bond, and vastly 
superior to deposits in Banks of Sav- 
ings, for the reason that it combines 

Absolute Security 
with Immense 
Possibilities 
of Gain 



when oil is struck. There is no "read- 
ing between the lines" in this propo- 
sition. Whatever happens to the 
Ophir Oil Company your investment 
is safe. You cannot lose. Only a 
limited amount of this Secured Stock 
is offered for sale. While it lasts it 
can be had for 



75c. per Share 



Fully Paid and Non-assessable. Sold 
only in blocks of f500 and upward. 
Common stock, unsecured, can be had 
at Fifty Cents per share in centificates 
of twenty shares and over. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

WAKRKN QILLMJCN 

President Broadway Bank, Los Angeles 

JOHN W. A. OFF 

Cashier State Bank and Trust Co., Los 
Angeles 

JOHN MASON GARDINER 

Engineer and General Contractor of Pub- 
lic Works, Phoenix, A. T., and Los Angeles 

JOHN MARTIN 

President Martin Pipe and Foundry Co. 
Mgr. Stanley Electric Co., San Francisco 

GEORGE KENT I OOPER 

Manager occidental Hotel, San Francisco 

NATHANIEL J. M ANSON 

Attorney-at-Law, t'an Franc'sco 

H. R. HURLBUT 

Fifteen years in charge of Advertising 
Department, San Francisco Call 



Ophir Oil Co. 

Los Angeles Office 

402 Douglas Bldg. 

Room 14, Fifth floor, Mills Building 
San Francisco, California 



matter of fact," said Colonel Ogden, "there are 
many places in Southern California that offer to 
the student and scholar wonderful opportunities 
for the study of stratagraphical geology. While 
it is admitted that the southern portion of the 
State is of much more recent origin, geologically, 
than the northern part, yet there are curious 
anomalies of formation found here in the oil-bear- 
ing strata. As an illustration, Pico canyon, Puente 
and certain portions of the Fullerton field show a 
much more ancient age geologically than the con- 
tiguous country. Why this is so will be better 
understood after an examination of the conditions. 
Our oil fields in Southern California are virtually 
what were once the sea beaches of ancient prehis- 
toric seas, and it is along these sea beaches that 
we find our richest oil territories. When we pass 
out into the valley lands that were once under the 
bodies of these seas, or that formed the bottom, 
we encounter the sedimentary deposits, both al- 
luvial and diluvial, which have been washed there 
and filled up the valleys and low places, by the ebb 
and flow of these ancient waters, and after their 
subsidience, by the detritus of mighty rivers and 
by the resistless force of glacial action. Yet with 
all these mighty changes that took place in pre- 
historic times and the later action of the elements 
through all the succeeding epochs, we find about 20 
miles this side of San Diego some 30 trees which 
belong to the carboniferous period in geology. 
These trees are what is known as the Torrey pine, 
and are probably the only living representatives of 
their species. They are certainly unique, and 
should be removed to the several parks in this 
city, to be cherished as part of the natural curi- 
osities of Southern California." 

His conclusion from the geological conditions 
which are found are that Southern California will 
develop into one of the greatest oil fields in the 
world, rivaling that of Baku, Russia, which has 
produced so many wonderful wells. 

With oil hovering near the $1.25 point, and an 
upward tendency, the prospect before oil men is 
very encouraging. 

t$ t£ t$ 

As if two oil exchanges, who are trying to keep 
oil stocks down to the lowest point, was not 
enough, we now have a woman's oil exchange to 
add to the troubles of the producers. Now for a 
boom in the companies which have pretty names. 



£ 99999* 99 99999 999 — — >^ . 

$ Horace S. Cutter Edward D. Silent 



The Origin of Kissing 

ACCORDING to Professor Cesare Lombroso, 
the distinguished Italian criminologist, 
kissing is quite a modern practice and or- 
iginated in a very curious manner. The kiss, as a 
token of affection, was unknown to the old Greeks, 
and neither in Homer nor in Heisod do we find 
any mention of it. Hector did not kiss his An- 
dromache when he bade her farewell, neither did 
Paris press his lips to those of the beauteous Hel- 
en, and Ulysses, who was more of a cosmopolitan 
than any man of his day, never dreamed of kissing 
the enchanting Circe, and when after long wander- 
ings he returned home to his spouse, Penelope, he 
satisfied himself with putting one of his stalwart 
arms around her waist and drawing her to him. 

The people of Terra del Feugo, says Lombroso. 
have taught civilized nations the origin of the de- 
lightful art of kissing. Drinking vessels are un- 
known in that country, and the people, when they 
are thirsty, simply lie down beside brooks and 
drink the water as it flows by them. It is evident, 
however, that infants could not satisfy their thirst 
in this primitive fashion, and therefore their 
mothers have for ages supplied them with water 
by filling their own mouths first and then letting 
it pass through their lips into the expectant 
mouths of their little ones. In some places the 
banks of the brooks and rivers are so high that 
water cannot be obtained in the usual manner and 
the mothers in such places draw it up through 
long reeds. 

Birds feed their young ones in a similar manner. 
They first fill their own mouths with water and 
then transfer it to the wide open mouths of the 
little ones. This very ancient maternal practice 
is, according to Lombroso, the only source to 
which the modern practice of kissing can be 
traced. The custom of pressing one mouth to an- 
other originated with the women in Terra del 
Fnego, who could only supply their infants with 
drink in this manner, and it is presumable that 
they learned the lesson from the birds. Finally, 
we are told that kissing is an evidence of atavism 
and a memorial of that early stage in our develop- 
ment "during which the wife had not yet tri- 
umphed over the mother nor love over maternity." 

Lombroso's views on this subject meet with the 
general approval of scientists, though there are 
some who point out that his explanation of the 
origin of kissing is not in accordance with the one 
handed down to us by the old Romans. These lat- 
ter maintained that the kiss was invented by hus- 
bands, who desired to ascertain in this way wheth- 
er during their absence from home their wives 
had been drinking their wine or not. 



Ed. D. Silent & Co. 

ESTABLISHED IN 1885 
MEMBERS 

LOS ANGELES OIL EXCHANGE 
CALIFORNIA OIL EXCHANGE 



BUY AND SELL 



Oil Stocks Strictly on Commission 



# OFFICE 

S 216 West Second street Tel. Main 695 

t The only way to purchase Oil Stocks t 

f is through some disinterested 

J Capable Broker ■ * 

i 4 

Vl/p Deal in Oil Stocks Exclusively 
Tt L Are thoroughly posted ... f 



Dickinson & Bush 



OIL STOCK BROKERS 

Wilcox Building 



^ih^^ititit^ibititittttt<tttttiib^tfvtiiditbtfcvt<Uiifaifckfcititittt4£ 

I Kern River Oil I 

and Development Co. 



301 Laughlln Bldg. 312 Sansome St. 

Los Angeles San Francisco 

Own outright 320 acres in Kern District. 

Lease outright on 100 acres in Fullerton Dis- 
trict, near big producing wells. 

250,000 shares, $1.00 each 100,000 shares in 
treasury. Non-assessable. 

20 Cents a Share 



C. W. SMITH. President H. 0. HAINE8, Treasurer 

F. C. MELTON, Secretary 

m fleu; <?eQtury Oil <?o. 

Has a total of 38fi3 acres of the choicest Oil Lands, situated 
in the very heart of the known and proven best producing 
districts. This Company will also manufacture, under U. 8. 
patent 439,745, 

Gasoline, Kerosene, Sewing Machine 011, 
Bicycle 011, Engine 011, Cylinder Oil 
and Asphaltum 

Samples of all these can be seen at the Company's office. 
Subscriptions for stock will be received from 1U a m. to 5 p m 
SHAKES * 1 .OO E'ICH 



323 Acres in Soquel Canyon 



NEW CENTURY OIL COMPANY 

Telephone GREEN 564 108-1 09-1 10 StlmSOn Blk. 

% \ki it »fc \ti iH it \t it m tit A \fc it it xfc >*« it it it Hi it \fc vfc >4i it \b ifc it tfc it iH it f- 

§ 
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s- 
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1 
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i 



Low Capitalization 
No Debts 



No Salaries 
No Assessments 



We reserve the right to advance without 
notice. We invite you to investigate our 
proposition and personnel from top to 
bottom. 

LIBERTY OIL CO. 

Rooms 201-220, 202'., S. Broadway 



Widows frequently lead bachelors to the mar- 
riage altar; they have been there before and know 
the way. 



mount Cowc Railway 

Magnificent Panorama of Earth and Ocean 
Grandest Trip on Earth 

ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

SITUATED on the summit of Echo Mountain. 
3500 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartments 
with or without baths. Cuisine unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

SPECIAL 

Guests remaining one week or longer will be al- 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fare 
to Echo Mountain and return and a 50c round trip 
rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily if 
desired. 

Tickets and full Information 

CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Traffic ami Kxcurslon Agent 
214 South Spring St. - - Los Angeles Cal. 
Tel. Main 960 




Western Graphic 

Music and Art 

Criticism and Comment Tr» X5he Doings of Artistic Folk 




EVERY now and then the happy dreamer in 
a church pew of a Sunday is suddenly 
aroused from his reflections by the voicing 
of a theme by the choir or the singer in the choir 
loft which, despite its suitably sacred text, sug- 
gests certain unniistakeable mundane and more 
worldly associations. The startled sleeper racks 
his brain to place the tune, finds where it had its 
earlier habitation, smiles perhaps, and then doses 
off again. No doubt it is a very laudable perform- 
ance to borrow from Satan to enrich the service 
of the church, but there is, none-the-less, a con- 
siderable risk that the attempt will not be as suc- 
cessful as the purloiner had hoped. This debat- 
able question as to what constitutes religious or 
"sacred" music is really one that will take an act 
of Congress to settle; the English are now, and 
have for some time, been wrestling with it. and 
they are talking of a special enactment of Parli- 
ment to protect the church from the music halls, 
and also to keep goodly church tunes from stray- 
ing into the worldly domains, there to do duty as 
garments for "popular" ditties or ambitious war 
odes. The London County Council has arrived at 
a modus Vivendi in the matter, but it hardly looks 
from this distance as if such a compromise should 
be necessary. There is a general misapprehen- 
sion as to what is sacred music. The distinction 
between it and secular music is generally drawn 
by those who cannot distinguish one tune from 
the other, by those who, as Charles Lamb con- 
fessed he was, are organically incapable of a tune. 
To me many people allow themselves to be gov- 
erned entirely by the words of the song. To such 
as these, if one writes a "Manila" march he has 
perpetrated a piece of "secular" music, but if it 
were rechristened with a sacred title it would be 
permitted into the purlieus of the most circum- 
spect home and pronounced most proper for per- 
formance on the family organ on a Sunday after- 
noon. The people organically incapable of a tune 
judge music by the words to which it has been 
set, if a song; or by the title, if a composition of 
absolute music — that is music which is not the 
setting of a poem, but stands alone. It does not 
matter to these how sentimental or worldly music 
may be in its general character, it is sacred be- 
cause it is so tagged. You may take a poem about 
angels and set it to cheap and sentimental music 
and, lo, you have written a "sacred" song. But 
again you may put all the most solemn and sin- 
cere feeling of which you are capable into the 
slow movement of a symphony, and unless you 
label it "adagio religioso", you have written secu- 
lar music. 

It is not to be denied — despite the organic in- 
capables — that there is much good worldly music 
that has been elevated to religious use, not to the 
tremendous extent practiced by the Salvation 
Army, which pours all sorts of worldly grist into 
its mill — and one who hunts through the standard 
hymn books can find innumerable instances of the 
snatching of the weapons of the devil wherewith 
to fight him from the secular armory. This prac- 
tice does no particular harm except when some 




The Charm of Music 

DEPENDS on the player, the Instrument and the 
quality of the music. What more rapturous 
than to he«r the melody on a moonlight night of u 
good Guitar, Mandolin or Banjo as It floats in gentle 
undulations on the evening breeze? 

You Can't Go Wrong: 

If you buy of U9, at prices trimmed to suit your pocket. 

Florentine Mandolins and Seville Guitars 
are Easy to Play and Easy to Buy 



HOLD AGENCY 



The Bartlett Music Co, 

22,3-23^ S. Broadway 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



extraordinarily familiar popular tune is taken. 
Many organists delight in turning popular tunes 
into fugues and voluntaries by materially chang- 
ing the tempo, and thereby cause no distress to 
the Incapables who belong to the audience, nor 
much discomfort to those who do recognize the 
air, but pardon the practice because it is in the 
service of a holy cause. But there is in every 
community an unforgiving element which will not 
sanction such a procedure. Some timje ago a 
talented bunch of vocalists, whose practice is 
before the lyceums of the country, visited here, 
and in conversation with its manager he told me 
of an experience which illustrates this. He had, 
in his repertoire, a cleverly harmonized version of 
the Brindisi from "Lucretia Borgia, Tis Better 
to Laugh Than be Sighing," which his company 
had been singing throughout the East. But in 
Michigan the singing of the song was greeted by 
several hisses, despite the fact that the title and 
words had been completely metamorphosed, and 
both were eminently respectable. The song was 
then dropped in deference to the tender feelings 
of the people of the Middle West. The harm was 
done, however, for the story traveled ahead, and a 
number of cancelled engagements because of it and 
stringent stipulations that it should be unsung in 
other places, showed the tendency of the irrecon- 
cilables. I tried to get him to sing it here, but 
he did not dare to take the risk. 

The very earliest Christian music took its rise 
from the melodies of Ancient Greece. These were 
not even of the "classical" style, but were of the 
"popular" order, very much on the same plan as 
is now being followed by the Salvation Army. In 
fact, this scheme has always been adopted in a 
new sect with sagacious leaders. The Jews on 
leaving Egypt took With them the melodies of 
their native land, and it was not until a long time 
afterwards that David reformed the music. St. 
Mark taught ti.e first Christians how to chant 
their prayers; those after him strayed away from 
the Grecian models because these, like their sculp- 
ture were of a plastic order; they did not take 
music deeply into the inner life. When the hand- 
washing water was passed, each one in the com- 
pany was asked in turn to praise God in song, 
and much improvisation was indulged in, some of 
which, no doubt, was preserved. 

Folksongs lie at the foundation, probably, of 
the Christian religious music, as they do in that 
of other sects. But they were surcharged with re- 
ligious fervor; what they once were did not 
bother the early Christians, so long as they were 
a popular vehicle for the praising of God in 
musical accents. Much of the Jewish music found 
its way into the church, for it must be remem- 
bered that the Apostles were Jews who used 
many of the rites of their earlier faith. The 
chanting of the Scriptures is an instance of note. 
The choir question was a burning one even at that 
time, and the right to join in the singing was, 
din ing the first two or three centuries, very high- 
ly prized. There was long contest between con- 
gregational and paid singing. In the middle of 
the second century all the congregation sang to- 
gether, according to St. John Cfysostom, who 
says: "The psalms which we sing unite all the 
voices in one, and the canticles arise harmo- 
niously in unison. Young and old, rich and poor, 
men, women, slaves and citizens, all of us have 
formed but one melody together." In A. D. 379 
this was stopped and only men were allowed to 
sing the psalms. In 481 this was further amended 
so that only regularly paid "canonical singers" 
were allowed to sing during the service. A very 
natural abuse followed and things ran along, 
getting steadily worse and more florid, until the 
popes interfered by establishing schools for church 
singers. These had their turn, until again a re- 
form was needed, when Martin Luther revived 
congregational singing, and Palestrina made his 
memorable and epoch-making cleansing of the 
Catholic musical shambles. Luther, too, took 
many folksongs and caused new tunes like them 
to be written. These are in the Protestant wor- 
ship of today, and are broad and simple chorals. 
Their use by the Reformers caused the Catholics 
to turn to a simpler style and thus made Pales- 
trina possible. He substituted free polyphony for 
the rigid and expressionless canon. The practice 
of taking from the oratorio and the opera began 
almost with the birth of these two forms of 
music, for it was soon found that the church 
modes were not suitable to the embodiment of 
human passions. The dramatic value of a church 
song was ever before the eyes of a composer, just 
as today the singer in a choir makes selections 
with a view to properly impressing an audience. 
It is clear, therefore, from the foregoing, that the 
startled church sleeper will do well to think twice 
about registering a protest against the singing by 
the choir of something that uncovers an associa- 
tion of his, even if it be of the most worldly sort, 
because the practice was followed by reformers 
who have left a lasting imprint upon history. 

Continued on Page is 



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Western Graphic 
The Major's Kiss 

By William Wallace %~ O O K 



New York. Jan. t 189 — 

MAJOR LOLLIPOP, 
To Miss Isabelle Mae Hobson, Dr., 
To One Kiss, Delivered $25,000 

A prompt remittance will oblige. 

This was the Major's New Year's greeting. 
Small wonder that he felt out of sorts, and that 
a pair of brandy-and-sodas utterly failed to restore 
his equanimity. Back of this little bill throbbed 
a whole volume of unwritten history. Condensed 
into the narrowest possible limits, it ran some- 
thing like this: 

A man named Harrington — who, by request of 
some members whose name no one has since been 
able to discover, had secured the privileges of 
the Major's club for a fortnight — was the cause 
Of it all, and it all happened on a certain "ladies' 
night," destined never to fade from the memory of 
poor Lollipop. 

In the course of the evening there had entered 
upon the dancing floor a woman who was univer- 
sally conceded to be a "poem of loveliness," and 
whom the Major characterized as a "dream." The 
Major, nattered by the reputation of being the 
most distinguished-looking man in the club, was 
introduced, obtained the favor of a waltz, and af- 
terward retired to the cardroom in a state of 
perspiration and tender sentiment. By seeming 
chance — but, as the Major discovered later, by fell 
design — Harrington met him at one of the whist 
tables. 

Harrington also had met and danced with the 
Major's "dream" and the Major, softened to tem- 
porary Imbecility by his evening's experience, 
looked upon Harrington as a rival and wondered 
what the effect would be if he quarreled with a 
visiting member and called him out. 

"How about a game, Major?" asked Harring- 
ton. 

The Major looked around. The two were alone 
in the card-room. 

"It would suit me exactly," replied the Major, 
"If we had two more to make out the hand." 

"We need not play whist," said Harrington, 
smoothly; "perhaps seven-up — or poker, eh? We 
are quite alone here. It may be, however, that you 
prefer the society of Miss Hobson " 

"That is a matter, sir," replied the Major, 
bluntly, "that lies entirely between the lady and 
myself. Boy, bring the poker chips." 

The Major dropped into a chair, and Harring- 
ton smiled in an exasperating way as the ivories 
were dumped on the table, and remarked: 

"I have an appointment with her myself toward 
the close of the evening. Delightful girl, charm- 
ing." 

The Major grunted as he arranged the chips. 
Such remarks by Harrington were highly distaste- 
ful to him. Without more ado they began to 
play, and, although the ante was small and the 
limit reasonable, one jack-pot, a bluff and a hand 
of four aces were sufficient to clean out the Major. 
The Major's animosity was expressed in his play. 
He would not have left the game at that stage, 
for a cool thousand. 

T am out of money," he said, "but a check " 

"I don't want your money," interrupted Har- 
rington, "but I have the honor to propose a wager 
worth your time — that is, if you dare accept it." 

"Dare, sir, dare!" blustered the Major. "What 
is the wager, sir?" 

"We will divide the chips evenly and play until 
one or the other has no more. The loser is to pay 
the penalty by kissing Miss Hobson." 

The Major was on his feet in an instant. 

"How you can have the brazen impudence, sir. 
to suggest such a thing, passes my comprehen- 
sion!" he exclaimed. 

Harrington was not ruffled in the least. 

"I admit," he said, "that the odds are greatly 
in my favor. If I lose, the great and plainly ap- 
parent esteem in which the lady holds me places 
me in a position at once to cancel my obligation. 
You, on the contrary, should you lose, might have 
some difficulty " 

A red flush diffused itself over the Major's 
visage. 

"And do you propose to set yourself above me in 
the esteem of Miss Hobson?" he queried. "Egad! 
I'll play the game if for nothing else than to take 
the conceit out of you!" 

And they did play it— and the Major lost. As 
he rose from the table he was well-nigh over- 
whelmed at the prospect before him. 

"Difficult, almost impossible as the task is for 
you, I shall yet insist upon your performing it." 
declared Harrington. 

"I am a man of my word," replied the Major, 
haughtily. 

He was also a man of infinite resource although 
he did not say it. and he did not think that to him 
anything was impossible; but he very shortly de- 
parted for his home to canvass ways and means, 
and decide how best to proceed in the difficult 
matter before him. 

To kiss a young lady, to do this deliberately 
and upon slight acquaintance— the task was her- 



culean! The Major must be tactful, diplomatic. 
He must summon all his reserve forces and mar- 
shal them skillfully; even then he might meet his 
Waterloo. He could not go at this thing with 
dash and verve; he must be artful, courtly and 
agreeable, and he must play a waiting game. 
There was one thing in his favor — Miss Hobson 
had invited him to call. Here undoubtedly was 
the open sesame. On the following afternoon he 
availed himself of her invitation. 

Miss Hobson received him with delightful un- 
conventionality. As they conversed the fair one 
in some bewitching way made it seem as though 
they had known each other for years. They first 

became familiar, then confidential, and then 

Well they were seated on a divan quite close to 
each other looking at a portfolio of etchings. 
Suddenly the Major's cherished ideas of tact, di- 




plomacy and a waiting game were cast to the 
winds. By an impulse that was irresistible he bent 
forward, kissed the lady at his side and straight- 
ened up with an air of martial dignity, his pro- 
tean thoughts seeking to evolve an explanation 
which somehow wouldn't evolve. But no explana- 
tion was needed. Miss Hobson simply laughed, 
chucked him playfully under the chin and went on 
looking at the pictures. 

The Major was greatly disturbed. Was it possi- 
ble that he saw the shadow of impending evil al- 
ready hovering above his devoted head? When 
he left that afternoon Miss Hobson bade him fare- 
well with an air of proprietorship which he did 
not relish. A rough hand had suddenly sounded 
a discord on the harp of the Major's fancy. Of 
course Miss Hobson was beautiful, charming, 
but Well, there were others. 

The Major was a little disgusted with himself 



Western Graphic 



9 



when be went to bed that night. When he got 
up he was greeted with the bill whose single item 
is noted at the beginning of this veracious chroni- 
cle. After mature reflection the Major sat down 
and wrote the following note: 

"New York, Jan. 1. 189— 
Miss Isabelle Mae Hobson, City — 

Madam: Your bill came duly to hand. I have 
no recollection of having ordered the goods in- 
voiced; but. be this as it mav. is not the price a 
little high? Yery truly, 

J. THOMAS LOLLIPOP." 
The following afternoon the Major had the 
great pleasure of reading these lines: 

"Dear Sir: It matters little whether or not you 
ordered the goods. You certainly received them, 
and the courts hold this to be a bona-fide expres- 
sion of debt. To refresh your memory. 1 enclose 
a photograph taken at the time the goods were 
delivered. As to my price being exorbitant, 
please reflect that I could have made it fifty 
thousand as well as twenty-five. Hopinfe for an 
early remittance, I remain, yours truly, 

ISABELLE MAE HOBSON." 
A cabinet photograph of himself in the act of 





I 



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METROPOLITAN OIL CO. 




kissing Miss Hobson had dropped into the Major's 
hand. He groaned as he looked at it. 

At this interesting point a servant announced 
Mr. Ralph Somerindyke, a friend of the Major's 
who lived in Boston. 

"I can't see him now," said the Major. "I just 
simply can't. Tell him to call again." 

"But he says it's a case of life and death." 

The Major could not resist this appeal, and lie 
hastily tucked Miss Hobson's letter and the pho- 
tograph in a convenient drawer and arose to meet 
his friend. 

Mr. Somerindyke was round of form, bald and 
florid. He was pallid, extremely nervous, and 
there was a wild glare in his eyes. 

"Major," he said hoarsely, sinking into a chair, 
"you see before you a desperate man. I am 
ruined, sir! My character is gone, and when a re- 
spectable member of society finds his character 



gone, what relief is there but in the laudanum 
bottle? Where can ' 

"That will do, Somerindyke?" broke in the 
Major. "You seem to imagine that you're the only 
man in the country that can have trouble. By 
gad, sir, you have no monopoly on despair." 

"But you don't know it all. Major. Why its 
simply awful! To think that I. at my time of 
life, should rashly bet that I could— could kiss a 

woman inside of twenty-four hours, and " 

Hold!" cried the Major. "Let me understand 
you. You made a bet that you would kiss a cer- 
tain woman inside of twenty-four hours?" 

"I did." was the hollow rejoinder. 

"In Boston?" 

"In Boston." 

"When?" 

"A month ago." 

"Was there anything else? Don't hesitate, 
Somerindyke. You are not the only fool in this 
broad land. Unbosom yourself." 

"It was all a trap," went on Somerindyke, hotly. 
"The man with whom I made the bet was in the 
scheme; the woman I was to — to kiss had also a 
hand in the plot. I kissed her, they photographed 
me while I did it, and now — ehe threatens to sue 
me for ten thousand dollars. It's blackmail, but 
for me there remains only death or disgrace un- 
less you lend me this ten thousand. That's what 
I came all the way from Boston to see you 
about.." 

"Have you the lady's letters?" 
"Yes, all." 

"Give them to me. And the photograph?" 
"I have that also." 
"Let me see it." 

Tremulously Somerindyke produced a small 
packet of letters and a photograph and handed 
them to his friend. The Major eyed the picture 
and. as he had surmised, the young lady in ques- 
tion was none other than Isabelle Mae Hobson. 

"This is a very serious matter, Somerindyke, 
very serious," remarked the Major, with a dry 
cough, "and it is well that you came to me in 
your trouble. You have been very f oolish." 

"Don't twit me of it, don't!" wailed Somerin- 
dyke. "Haven't I borne enough?" 

"If I get you out of this will you promise never 
to make a fool of yourself again? ' 

"Of course! But can you do it?" 

"I will do my best. Call to-morrow at this time 
and report." 

Somerindyke went away and the Major smiled 
broadly as he seateu himself at his desk and wrote 
the following: 

New York, Jan. 3. 189—. 

Miss Isabelle Mae Hobson, City — 

Madam: Your letter is at hand and the photo- 
graph is extremely natural; it exactly resembles 
another photograph which I have seen and which 
was taken in Boston. In this I enclose your bill 
against me and also a bill against my friend, 
Somerindyke. A comparison of the two bills 
shows that you are attempting to make us both 
pay for the same goods, and the courts hold that 
this is unlawful, to say the least. I therefore re- 
quest that you return both bills to me, receipted. 
If you do not I shall be compelled to take the 
other horn of the dilemma. With you, however, 
it strikes me as being simply a case of Hobson's 
choice. Truly yours, 

J. THOMAS LOLLIPOP." 
It is needless to say that the bills came back 
receipted, and Somerindyke never knew how his 
friend, the Major, had engineered his salvation. 
His friend, the Major, would never tell. 

WILLIAM WALLACE COOK. 



I rv the Play 

In a painted "forest of Arden," in the glare of the 
garish light, 

In doublet and hose, bepowdered and rouged, you 

sigh to me night by night; 
Attuned to the sway of your cadenced voice as a 

harp to the wooing wind, 
I thrill at the touch of your painted lips, for— "I'm 

your Rosalind." 
Could you know that my art in seeming was a 

dearer thing than art, 
That the love words whispered nightly spring 

straight from a loving heart : 
Could you know that my soul speaks to you— aye, 

soul and spirit and mind — 
When I gaze deep into your eyes nnd breathe. 

"And I am your Rosalind!" 
To you 'tis a vain dissembling, a part of the work 

of the day; 

And the words that your voice makes music, but 

the dull, dead lines of a play. 
Little you care for the woman you woo, save as a 

foil designed 

To prove your skill as a lover; yet — "I am your 
Rosalind." 

I merge in the player the woman. The actress 
good at her art 

Must needs look well to each glance and tone, 
must needs play still a part. 

Tho' the woman soul that must else be dumb- 
aye, soul and spirit and mind — 

Cry to your soul in another's words: "And I am 
your Rosalind!" 

—Leigh Cordon Giltner in New England Magazine. 



GARDEN I NG 
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II) 




Western Graphic 
Where Cool Breezes Blow 



Golf .... 
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Saturday, 25th 
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est man from Texas, growing reminiscent over a 
dish of sweetbreads a la financiere, "but that Pa- 
cific railway takes you through some of the finest 
country hereabouts. When you have an extra half 
an hour in town you don't know what to do with 
take the electric car and come round hy Holly- 
wood." 

"Would you believe it," said the most agreeable 
Arizona man, wavering between iced cucumbers 
and lettuce mayonnaise, but they say you can 
get 'round all the beaches on the same Sunday 
from Santa Monica — if you know how to work 
it." 

"Too country," said the up-town Pennsylvania 
man as he took a second help of the fillet of beef 
a la bourgeoise, "no all day picnics for me." 

"What next?" murmured the Cripple Creek hero, 
halting between the unpronouncable chicken, the 
stuffed turkey and the prime ribs. 

"Too much for me," said the Frisco man, stop- 
ping short at the twenty-ninth article half way 
down the bill-of-fare. "I have taken all I can" — 
as he took to his heels. 

"Do you know," began the man from Los An- 
geles, who hadn't spoken before, "the music in 
that merry-go-round should be on the prohibition 
list. Detriment, to the S. P." And he viciously 
swallowed a bowl of Jenny Lind pudding with the 
brandy sauce. " 'Home, Sweet Home,' darn Home, 
Sweet Home. What does a fellow want to hear 
'There is no Place Like Home' for just as soon as 
he puts his foot on the plank walk?" 

"Yes," mildly said the reminiscent man from 
Texas who hadn't spoken before; "why don't they 
start up 'Santa Monica, Santa Monica, there is no 
place like Santa Monica,' or Pd leave my happy 
home for Santa Monica — 00 — 00 — 00." 

"Of course," said Mr. Jones of Philadelphia, 
"but there will be no place like home in Santa 
Monica till we have some real genuine Atlantic 
City salt-water taffy." 

"What is the matter with Coney I. Wiener- 
wursts," said the up-town Pennsylvania man, 
languishing among the last thirteen articles of 
sweets on the bill-of-fare. 

"I don't know," said the richest man from any- 
where. "I give it up" — as he handed the prettiest 
maid of the Arcadia — a nickel. 

AVALON— The gay throng at Santa Catalina 
have had no lack of amusements during 
the week past. The cakewalk at Hotel 
Metropole Saturday evening was the social event 
of the season and brought such a throng of in- 
vited guests that many were obliged to stand 
through the performance. An interesting incident 
of the occasion was an edict promulgated by the 
management refusing to issue invitations to any 
unmarried person, their ticket of admission being 
a black face. The result was a striking admix- 
ture of darktown denizens with the aristocratic 
guests of Hotel Metropole. The cake walk was 
an unqualified success and brought out some 
striking and unique make-ups. The grand march 
was led by Norwood Howard, manager of the Ho- 
tel Metropole and as a coon drum major he proved 
a success. Hyman Myer in costume gave a song 
"I Wants My Chickens Back," which was greeted 
with rapturous cheering and the cake-walkers were 
cheered to the echo as they gyrated through their 
exhibition "walk." Those participating, by couples 
were the following: Peter Schaefer and Miss Mar- 
guerite Griffin; Mrs. Mumford and Miss Patti 
Woodard: Neil Trailor, Miss E. Schaefer; Henry 
Paine, Miss Mae Kidder; Frank Pearson, Miss 
Emma Bumiller; Conway Griffith, J. M. Beck; A. 
J. Copp, Jr., Miss King; L. J. Rice, Mrs. F. R. 
Frost; Jack Johnstone, Miss Huiskamp; Charles 
B. Paine, Miss Violet Preston; Norwood Howard, 
Miss Gertrude Hill. The two couples first men- 
tioned took the cakes. The judges were Col. Dan 
Burns. Mrs. M. J. Connell, Mrs. M. J. Branden- 
stein. 



The tug-of-war held on July 4th resulted unsat- 
isfactorily to the losing team and when the judges 
rendered their decision they thought a cyclone had 
struck them, the losers and their friends holding 
that foul tactics on the part of the winners had 
caused their loss. The best way out was to pull 
over again, and the judges raised a purse of $50 
and arranged for a retrial last Sunday afternoon. 
It was an exciting event and thousands crowded 
the beach and boats to witness the fun, giving 
forth deafening cheers as one side or the other 
gained advantage. The result was scarcely in 
doubt, however, as the winners of the former tug 
won this also in the short time of ten minutes. 
The winning team was Mexican Joe, Chappie, Carl 
Lewis, Ernest Morris and Bert Covey. The losers 
Juan Batiste, Italian George, Harry Doss, Jim 
Gardener and James Hopkinson. The Judges, Col. 
Dan Burns, Geo. D. Gale and F. H. Gassaway. 

P. J. Murphy, a champion live bird shot, gave an 
exhition shoot Sunday afternoon, killing twenty 
birds in succession without a miss, killing three of 
them while standing on his head. 

Topsy, the monkey that caused the death of Mrs. 
Reashaw through fright, has been gathered to its 
forefathers. It had been confined in a box since 
that unfortunate incident, but some meddler re- 
leased it and it climbed to the top of a tall tree 
and refused to come down from its perch. Not 
know-ing what mischief it might work should it 
run amuck through the camp it was shot. 

The tuna fishing broke out again Wednesday af- 
ter nearly three weeks' cessation. Vast schools 
are in the bay and about the island again and the 
anglers are happy. 

REDONDO BEACH— With the possible excep- 
tion of some small select party it is doubt- 
ful if a more representative gathering of 
society people was ever assembled on one occasion 
than that which attended the dance at Hotel Re- 
dondo Saturday evening last. The summer parties 
at Hotel Redondo have long been noted for their 
popularity with the society people of Los Angeles 
and vicinity, to such an extent, in fact, that it has 
come to be considered the social center during the 
summer season. 

Among those who enjoyed the dance were: 
Mr. and Mrs. William Pridham. Mr. and Mrs. 
W. S. Porter, Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Busch, Mr. and 
Mrs. H. D. Lombard, Mr. and Mrs. George D. 
Easton, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Easton, Mr. and Mrs. 
A. C. Denman, Jr., of Redlands, Mr. and Mrs. H. 
H. Sinclair of Redlands, Col. and Mrs. P. H. Sey- 
mour, Captain and Mrs. G. E. Overton, Mr. and 
Mrs. J. W. Hendrick, Mr. and Mrs. George Sinsa- 
baugh of Sierra Madre. Mr. and Mrs. Percy N. Mc- 
Mahon, Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Garnsey, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dan McFarland, Mr. and Mrs. T. A. I^ewis, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. E. Dunn, Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Ains- 
worth, Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Clark, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. G. Young, Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Osburn of 
Riverside, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Carpenter, Lieut, and 
Mrs. Randolph Miner, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bohon, 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Henderson of Riverside, Mr. 
and Mrs. W. G. Nevin; Mmes. J. H. F. Peck, D. W. 
Shanks, I. N. Van Nuys, J. B. Gwynne, A. M. Ste- 
phens, George F. Cope. John Carson, Ridgeway, 
Margaret Hobbs, William Bartling, Charles Hen- 
derson of Riverside, Page, Dobbins; the Misses 
Louise McFarland, May Ridgeway, Florence Silent, 
Eliza Bonsall, Seymour, Bessie Bonsall, Champion, 
Ora C. Champion, Irene Stephens, Brotherton, 
Overton, Wright of Riverside, Virginia Dryden, 
Cope, Lizzie Lewis, Cartnell of Tustin, Lou 
Winder, Louise Burke, Adalaide Brown, Deming. 
Donna Felter, Blanche Donnell, Orilla Donnell, Sin- 
clair of Redlands, Easton, Mercereau, Waddilove, 
Blumer, of Sierra Madre, Mable Garnsey, Jane 
Dorsey. Mullins, Ethel Mullins, Hender of River- 
side, the Misses Sutton of Pasadena, Dobbins, 
Graer, McCormick, Crutcher of Kentucky, Carpen- 
ter, Susie Carpenter, Clark, Inez Clark, Lillian 
Wellborn, May Corson, Annis Van Nuys, Clemons, 
Messrs. W. R. Norris, L. R. Freeman, James 
Hobbs, Britton, Douglas Burnett, Karl Klokke. 
Earl Pursell, Percy South of Covina, Sam Has- 
kins, Thomas Haskins, Dan McFarland, J. G. 
Easton, Gregory Perkins, Jr., Burton E. Green, 
Elisha Eldred, Thos. L. Winder, C. F. Burke, J. 
W. Wolters, F. I. Herron, B. B. Wright of River- 
side. Eugene Overton, Charles Seyler, Jr., Fowler 
Shankland, P. H. Lyon. D. J. Frick, W. W. Ste- 
phens, Thomas Rhee, Clarence Variel, W. K. Craw- 
ford, E. P. Bryan, A. B. Young, D. A. McGilroy, 
Carroll Allen, E. B. Rowan, E. B. French, G. W. 
Stephens. Winthrop Blackstone. W. W. Cockins, 
Jr., Earl Cowan, S. G. Garnsey. Thomas W. Has- 
kins, Dr. Blumer, Sierra Madre, L. A. Pratt, G. E. 
Newlin, A. W. Sinclair of Redlands, J. Sunder- 
land, R. A. Rowan. J. B. Van Nuys, H. C. Austin, 
Simpson Sinsabaugh, Charles Sutton of Pasadena, 
Guy Corson, Nevin, Vermillion. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Porter and son are enjoying 
life at the hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Balch of Los Angeles have 
taken up their summer abode at Hotel Redondo. 

Mrs. H. B. Ainsworth has been entertaining a 
party of young folks from Los Angeles. 

A. B. Bush, a well-known business man of Los 
Angeles, has taken apartments at Hotel Redondo. 



Western Graphic 



11 



Waldo R. Norris visited friends in Los Angeles 
on Tuesday. 

A duffers' tennis tournament was one of the in- 
teresting diversions of the week. The only requi- 
site for entry was a fee of 25 cents and a reputa- 
tion for being a thoroughly bad player or no play- 
er at all. It was a handicap affair and no end of 
fun was enjoyed. Pretty prizes were awarded the 
winners. 

The Redondo Beach Country Club has announced 
an open golf tournament for next Saturday, the 



28th. Mr. William Robertson, the professional di- 
rector of the club, has the affair in charge and is 
making preparations for a big tournament. He 
has already extended the course considerably by 
replacing three of the old greens with new ones 
and is now having all of the greens finished with 
a dressing of petroleum and fine sand. Most of 
the prominent golfers of Southern California will 
participate and it is expected that this will be the 
largest tournament ever given by the club. A golf 
dance will be given at Hotel Redondo Saturday 
evening following the tournament. 



SANTA 



ONICA RESORTS 




With the Butterflies 

Doings ^ Among 5 People 5 in the 3 Gay 3 Life 



YOU wouldn't think it, but people do dress 
"to beat the band" at all the hotels this 
summer. Time was when you could take 
your alpacky of two years ago and your wedding 
dress made over for the hundred and oneth time 
and a few other things like that to the beach and 
rest. But now? No! You must sail in to break- 
fast en traine, stalk in to dejeuner-a-la-forchette, 
en golf (pronounced gauff please), and swim in en 
semble (whatever that is, but it's French) to din- 
ner. 

They say the dressing at the Redondo Hotel the 
other night for their tennis ball or whatever it 
was, was not half bad. Lots of people went there 
to stay over night and I understand some of the 
ladies took the briefest garments in their ward- 
robes. Saves luggage, you know, they didn't want 
to take trunks. I wonder why that Redondo man 
doesn't have those trees cut away that spoil all 
the marine views. Will any one tell me what is 
the good of a tree at the seashore any way, unless 
it is to see and not be seen. Well but the trees 
ar Redondo do see things — perhaps you thought 
it odd, my speaking of trees seeing when I first 
started out. At any rate whatever the trees saw 
at Redondo should be — like children — seen and not 
heard. They say there is an old Spanish proverb 
that vows "A man loves with his eyes, a woman 
with her ears." What has this to do with trees, 
Redondo and all that? Don't ask me. But there 
is another proven!) that dates longer back than 
the old Spanish one which reads "He who hath 
ears to hear" — better be deaf. Deaf? No, that is 
not it either. It is blind and it is love that is 
blind. Dear me, what am I getting into, I am all 
mixed up. 

To come back to the Redondo man and his trees, 
every one says there is no place like the Arcadia 
verandah for genuine comfort and Redondo must 
have a po'ch. 

Then at the Arcadia when you get tired of the 
porch rocking chair you can veer round and gaze 
straight out to sea through I really don't know 
how many windows. And now the new manage- 
ment, which is very accommodating, has arranged 
a charming sunset for the delectation of its guests 
that usually is brought on with the after dinner 
coffee. And since all one side of the dining room 
and the annex is glass, the meeting of sky and 
sea that I intimated is "deligtfully served" and 
worth coming weary miles to see. 

Speaking of the accommodating management, I 
never heard tell of so obliging a force. The lady 
from Los Angeles that grumbles about the fog one 
morning has it raised for her by next day and the 
gentleman from El Paso who complains of the heat 
has cool breezes brought in at short order. When 
the man in No. 2 wants the electric lights changed 
in the hall before his chamber door the Espee man- 
agement takes on a new move and it is done. And 
when the lady in 1002 wants the man in the next 
room changed because he moves like the Cuban 
army, the obliging clerk shows his dimple and — 
presto, change 

S 3 Jt 

What has all this to do with the butterflies at 
Los Angeles? I am sure I don't know. The But- 
terflies in this Angelic City are mostly on the 
wing. Of course there is nothing going on in 
town. There wouldn't dare to be — in the papers 
and besides I have not seen a paper for a week. 

I did hear tell of a wedding somewhere or other, 
but really I do not know that it was worth men- 
tioning. Marriages you know, like fires and things, 
are liable to break out at any time and I do not 
see much use in getting excited over them. 

They do say that camping at Coronado is quite 
one of the latest things and that next year every- 
body will be pitching their tent at the place that 
gets up some of the finest pictures of its hotels I 
have ever seen spread broadcast over the land. 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hicks and their small daugh- 
ter Elizabeth went down to the Hotel del Coro- 
nado one day last week and were welcomed by a 
brass band or something of the sort. They are 
considered quite an acquisition at any resort. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Francis will be quite im- 
partial in their visitations this summer. I believe 
they will try all the resorts, winding up at the 
Hotel Arcadia, Santa Monica. Sir John was in 
receipt one day last week of a greeting and a 
haul of trout from I. W. Hellman, who is resort- 
ing at the Tallac House, Lake Tahoe. Both the 
greeting and the trout were from the angler's own 
take place in the fall, it will be an event to look 



hand and were received with like appreciation. 

Mr. Francis has not yet officially opened up that 
new house of his in Bonnie Brae. When it does 
forward to. I am afraid we do not fully appre- 
ciate the situation that so many fine residences 
are going up. 

When the Neuer house is finished there will be 
another souiTe of gratification. It is building out 
on Ninth street and will be a magnificent struc- 
ture fit for even a Wilkesbarre millionaire. 

t(5^ 

Speaking of millions reminds me of a funny 
thing I heard quite incidentally the other day. A 
gentleman was anxious to be called a capitalist, 
and believing in the old saw that money can buy 
anything, he verified his convictions as he bought 
the name "capitalist" for himself. He did it this 
way. He bought three hundred copies of a big 
daily that consented to tack the magic word to 
his name. 

I do not know whether he got a reduction by 
buying the papers by the several hundred lot or 
not. Any way he got the papers, bargain or no 
bargain. He thought he got a bargain and that 
was sufficient. 

^8 

Speaking of new houses, there is still another 
that is going up in the same section of the town 
as the Neuer house. It is to be the home of the 
Harrises of Spokane and I understand is likewise 
to be a costly residence. The location is Sixth 
street just opposite the boat house of Westlake 
Park. When it is finished the charming young 
daughter of the house, Miss Louise, is to be for- 
mally presented to Los Angeles society. The 
Neuer house, it is said sub rosa, will be opened 
with the new year, and if all indications prove 
auspicious I dare say it will in reality be one of 
the largest, if not one of the swellest events of 
the time. Gentlemen as well as ladies will be re- 
ceived, for I understand that on various "open- 
ings" of new homesteads heretofore the masculine 
fraternity has considered itself slighted not to 
have been "among the guests." 

Mrs. W. H. Holliday and Miss Marie Louise went 
East on Monday en route for Europe. They will 
sail on the 25th, after making up a party of which 
Mrs. Joseph Holliday of St. Louis is to be a mem- 
ber. The Holterhoffs will be at Redondo the most 
of the summer. Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Barker and 
the rest of this particular set will all go to Coro- 
nado, I am told, for an outing in August. 

Once upon a time there was such a place as Ter- 
minal Island. I was under the impression that 
the island was washed off the map the same time 
that the Catalina boat house went over, but I may 
be mistaken, for I have just heard that a number 
of the younger butterflies are making up a house 
party at the Gordon Arms for August. There are 
to be Miss Kimball, the Wellborns, Miss May 
Newton, John Mott and that crowd, you know. 

I wonder why the Gordon Arms call that pic- 
ture of their's one sees of a gay young girl very 
decollette about the skirt an advertisement of the 
"Arms." Any other part of the lady would do as 
well I should think, but then there is no use to 
kick. The "young lady" does that. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Vail and some smaller Vails 
went down to Santa Monica one day last week and 
took up their abode at the Arcadia Hotel. 

The Arcadia, I am told, will be the gayest of the 
gay this month and next. Mr. and Mrs. John E. 
Plater will go into summer residence there the 
first of the month. The Newmarks are intending 
to go about the same time. 

Mrs. John H. F. Peck and her niece, Miss Felter 
of Saltecillo, will start a little later to be in time 
for the tournament. Then Mr. and Mrs. Busch. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Lombard, Mr. and Mrs. 
Dwight Whiting, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Monroe and 
a number of other prominent society people from 
Los Angeles will be in attendance beginning with 
tennis week, as well as the whole battalion of the 
young set. They are all expecting to stop at the 
Arcadia and then there will be a time. 

ANN IDLER. 



The automobile tired out 

And couldn't go at all, 
So they got an equine big and stout 

Its helpless hulk to haul. 
The automobile hung its head, 

Its hapless plight to see, 
And to its shamefaced self it said, 

"This is a horse on me." 



f)otel Hrcadia 

Santa JYIomca 
by the sea 

finest Summer Resort on the pacific 

Elegant Hotel Elevator 
Electric Lights Orchestra 

SERVICE, TABLE, AND APPOINTMENTS 
UNEXCELLED 

Delightful, cool breezes from the ocean on 

warmest days. 
An ideal Summer Resort for those who wish 

to escape the heat of interior towns 
The cleanest, smoothest and safest beach in the 

world. 

Surf bathing, boating, fishing, beautiful drives. 
Reached by S. P. R. R. trains and electric cars 

every half hour. Time from Los Angeles 

55 minutes. 
For rates and further information address 

W. E. ZANDER, Mgr. 



Ocean parkr^ <* 

Romes By the Sea So " t, \ of „ . 

' banta Monica 

Ocean front, Elegant beach. Water piped to tract, Electric llgh 
connection. Long lease, $10.00 to S '5.00 yearly rental. The 
best opportunity ever offered to secure a home on the beach 

Ocean Hir ^ Ocean Beach 
Ocean Bathing 

Call on or address 

X. H. DUDLEY 

Corner Hill and Beach Streets 
Ocean Park 



Santa Monica 

will be more attractive this summer than 
before. There are No Saloons a New Club 
House for golf and tennis, a salt water 
Plunge filled daily and kept warm and 

many other things which ought to make it 
the best summer resort this coming season. 
Address a letter to the North Beach Bath 
House Co. and we shall be glad to furnish 
you with all sorts of information about hotel 
rates, cottages, bathing, athletics or any- 
thing else you many desire to know. Let 
us help you locate this year. 



DAVIS M. CLARK 

REAL ESTATE, RENTAL AGENT 
I have a tine list of Cottages and Building Lots tor sale 
or rent. The finest Beach on the Coast. 

iioj S. Second St.. Oceanpark, 
At terminus of electric car lin L. A. Cft-. Cal. 



* 



FINE PRINTING 



Just jot it down that the GRAPHIC 
does everything in printing, big and 
little. We can make it pay you to 
do business with us in more ways 
than one, and remember that it is 
no trouble for.us to call and see you 
if you will ring up MAIN 1-0-5-3. 

Geo. Rice & son 

IN( ORPORATCD 

311-313 New High St. 



The Popular Science Monthly, which was estab- 
lished in 1872 by the Appletons and which has at 
present the largest circulation of any scientific 
journal In the world, Is now being edited by Pro- 
fessor James McKeen Cattell of Columbia Universi- 
ty, and published by McClure, Phillips & Co. Pro- 
fessor Cattell is well known as a psychologist and 
as the editor of Science. 



12 



Oldest and 'Largest Bank In Southern California 

FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) $500,000 SURPLUS AND RESERVE $926,742 
Total 11,426,742 

OFFICERS 

L W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashlei 

G. II KI M AN N A be Istant Cashlei 

DIRECTORS 
W. H. Perry C. E. Thorn A. Glassell 

O. W. Chllds I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 
J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 

WSpeclal Collection Department. Our safety deposit depart 
ment offers to the public, safes for rent In Its new fire and 
burglar proof vault, which is the strongest, best guarded 
and best lighted In this city. 



W. C. Patterson, President 
M. P. Green, Vlce-Prest. 



W. D. Woolwine, Cashier 

E. W. CoE, Asst. Cashier 



THE LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL 1500,000 SURPLUS and Undivided Profllts, $100,000 
United States Depositary 



Letters of Credit and Drafts issued available iu all parts of 
the world. 

W. F. BOTSFORD, President J. G. MOSSIN. Cashier 

G. W. HUGHES Viee-Pres. T. W. PHELPS, Ass't Cashier 

CALIFORNIA BANK 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

DIRECTORS: 

W. F. Botsford G. W. Hughes R. F. Lotspeich 
W. H. Burnham E. W. Jones W. S. Newhall 
Homer Laughlin I. B. Newton H. C. Witmer 

Capital Stock $250,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 35,000 

A General Banking Business transacted. 
Special attention given to Collections. 
Exchanges sold on all parts of the world. 



H. J. Wooi.lacott, President 
J. W. A. Off, Cashier 



R. H. Howeu., 1st Vice PreB. 
Warren Gii.i.ei.en, 2nd V. P. 



STATE BANK & TRUST CO. 

Of Los Angeles. 

PAID-UP CAPITAI HALF MILLION DOLLARS 

DIRECTORS: 



R. H. Howell 
H. J. Woollacott 
J. A. Muir 
Wm. M. Garland 



J. W A. Off' 
H. F. Porter 
F. K. Rule 



C. C. Allen 
A. W. Ryan 
Warren Gillelen 
L. C. Brand 



A General Banking Business transacted. Interest paid on 
Time Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes for rent 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

MAIN STREET SAVINGS BANK 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts. Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED »200,000 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP 100,000 

Interest paid on deposits Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUE President 

I. N. VAN NUYS Vice-President 

E. J. VAWTER, JR Cashier 

Directors — H. W. Hellman, Rasper Cohn, H. W. O'Melveny 
L. Winter, O. T. Johnson, T. L. Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. G 
Kerckhoff, A. Haas. 



CHAS. B PIRONI 

Sole Proprietor 



Located at West Glendale 
Los Angeles county 



West Glendale Winery and Vineyards 

Producer and Grower of 

High Grade Sweet and Table Wines 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TIME CARD 

Los Angeles and Redondo Ry. 

In EtTiCt June 3, 1900 

Depot: Corner Grand Avenue and Jefferson street 



Trains leave Los Ingeles lor Redondo 

DAILY 

8.10 am 
11.30 am 
3.30 pm 
(1.30 pm 
*12 00 Night 



Trains lt»i Redondo lor Us Ingeles 

DAILY 

7.00 am 
10.00 am 
1.30 pm 
5.00 pm 
11.00 pm 



•Wednesdays and Saturdays only. 

Connecting with Grand avenue or Main and Jeflerson street 
cars at Los Angeles. City Office: 246 S. Spring St. Tel. M . 1CW1 

For rates on freight ana passengers, apply at depot, corner 
Grand avenue and Jefferson st. Los Angeles Tel. West I. 

See Santa Fe schedule, tickets Interchangeable. 

L. J. Pkrrv, Superintendent. 

The Pacific Coast Regalia Co. 

f\. TENNANT G R f\ "V 

of?. u .T Military and Society Goods 



M anu 



Western Graphic 
T5/>e Country f R_ ound 

- •> v< v£ Notes on the Progress of Our Country y 



SAN PEDRO harbor is again in the hands 
of the contractors. It is promised that 
work shall be rushed. 

ti$^ 

The gold yield of the Yukon for 1900 is esti- 
mated at $25,000,000. Most of this wealth comes 
to the United States. 

jt ^ jt 

Apricots from Ventura county are on exhibition 
at the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce meas- 
uring seven inches in circumference, and only four 
'cots to the pound. Veritable New York Aldermen 
of the horticultural family. 

(,5^ (3^ 

It is reported that Mr. I. W. Hellman will make 
extensive improvements at Anaheim Landing, Or- 
ange county, where he owns considerable prop- 
erty. A hotel and club house may be erected if 
suitable lessees can be found. 

The drouths in India and Australia, which have 
been contemporaneous with the drouth on this 
coast, have been broken by ample rains. Our turn 
will come in a few months. 

J* Jt Jt 

San Luis Obispo county has not as large a crop 



the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, a gold coin- 
age of $107,000,000 and a silver coinage of $31,- 
000,000. 

Jt Jt Jt 

The recent visit of the Forestry Commissioners 
from the Agricultural Department at Washington 
shows that the national government is alive to the 
interests of this section. Immediately fire protec- 
tion stations will be established in the mountains. 
Afterwards the fire devastated sections will be 
planted with beautiful and useful trees which will 
protect the water supply and give a park like 
beauty to what is now a wild and desolate region. 
Jt Jt Jt 

The total assessment of the city of Los Angeles, 
made by the municipality itself, for 1900, foots up 
to the cheerful little sum of $07,723,837. This will 
produce, at the same tax rate as last year, up- 
wards of $1,000,000 revenue from taxes on real es- 
tate and personal property for city purposes only. 
The State and county are still to be heard from. 
Jt jt Jt 

A new and valuable industry is coming here in 
the shape of the Hercules Oil Refining plant for 
the purpose of refining California crude oil. The 
establishment is . to be located east of Alameda 




LIVE OAKS IN THE FOOT HILLS 



Flags, Banners, Badges, 
Uniforms and Swords 
Gold and Silver Trimmings 
Bullion Embroideries 



. . 1 1 o . . 

WEST SECOND STREET 



of grain as last year. Still the yield will reach 
nearly half a million sacks. 

.< < Jt 

The total cost of running the city schools from 
.lime 30, 1900, to June 30, 1901, is estimated at 
about $i!48.000. The last school census showed 
30,000 children within the limits of Los Angeles. 
The county schools receive this year $139,000 from 
the State as against $125,0000 last year. 

jt Jt Jt 

Kansas is now having a turn at the drouths 
which have been so unpleasantly prevalent all 
over the world of late years. A recent dispatch 
says that in several of the leading corn-growing 
counties half the crop is ruined. 

ljl 

Pennsylvania capital is coming this way in a 
most gratifying manner. There is plenty of it 
circulating in this city, and a high sum is to be 
put into the San Luis Obispo asphalt mines — the 
richest in the world. 

Santa Ana is sending to Los Angeles and San 
Diego 3000 rolls of the finest butter every week. 
Time was, and not long ago, when most of the 
butter used here was imported from the north. 
Now local dairymen have butter the larger part 
of the year for export. 

Jt jt Jt 

The United States government reports show for 



street, south of Sixth street, and will occupy about 
five acres. The refinery can handle about 20,000 
barrels of oil a month. Directly and Indirectly it 
will give employment to many and benefit the 
business interests of the city. 

Jt Jt Jt 

The colony of Ontario, Southern California, is to 
have two rural delivery postal routes, each about 
twenty miles long. Rural postal delivery is no 
new thing in the Eastern States, but the authori- 
ties have been rather slow in extending it to the 
coast. The plan has only one failing in the eyes 
of the country dweller. It deprives him of a good 
excuse to visit "the corners" to get the mail and 
listen to current gossip. 

Jt Jt 

Referring to the clearing house reports the San 
Francisco Bulletin says: 

"It is a pleasure to note a gain in the leading 
cities on the Pacific Coast for the month of June. 
In round numbers there was a gain for that month 
of $6,500,000 at San Francisco, $3,600,000 at Seattle 
$2,700,000 at Portland, $4,300,000 at Los Angeles 
anod $1,200,000 at Tacoma. Apparently the Pacific 
States have suffered less from the reaction in 
business for the month and the half year than 
other sections of the country." 

Jt jt ,«« 

It is to be feared a large percentage of the sev- 
eral hundred Los Angeles people who are trying 



Western Graphic 



13 



their fortunes at Cape Nome will return poorer, 
and still more is it to be feared they will come 
home broken in health or find their graves in that 
inhospitable land. Smallpox and typhoid are rag- 
ing in Nome and the good claims have all been 
taken. 

<£ <i* J* 

One of the saddest features of the terrible humid 
heat of the Eastern States is the suffering and 
death it causes among young children. A dispatch 
from New York last week said: 

To the continuation of the hot weather is at- 
tributed the high death rate among children. For 
the first six days of July the deaths reported of 
children of five years of age or under averaged 
fifty-three in Manhattan and the Bronx and forty- 
one in Brooklyn. Saturday's report showed fifty- 
one deaths of children under five years in Manhat- 
tan and the Bronx, and fifty-eight in Brooklyn. 
Sunday's list includes forty-five such deaths in 
Manhattan and the Bronx. 

J* & 

The Santa Fe has changed its rate so that it is 
possible to send a considerable package to Arizona 
points for twenty-five cents and upwards. The 
former minimum charge was $2. 

& <£ Jl 

The Throop Polytechnic School, Pasadena, has 
319 members, a gain of 146 members in a year. 
The object of this school is mainly to teach young 
people how to earn a living with their hands. The 
writer has noted the cases of a number who have 
been able to secure good positions after a course 
at the school. It is a wonder philanthropists do 
not endow such institutions liberally. They are 
far more practical than the numerous colleges 
which spoil many good artisans by turning them 
out as inferior lawyers, doctors and clergymen. At 
present the American boy, in the workshop, has 
a rather hard contest to compete with the German 
lad from the old country where manual training 
is so enforced that even the Kaiser himself, and 
his sons make it a rule to be master of some trade. 

The parks of Los Angeles have well repaid the 
money spent on them. This city is one of the 
pleasure resorts and play grounds of the world. 
Since Westlake park was changed from a barren 
alkali ravine to the beauty spot it now is several 
million dollars in residence improvements have 
been spent in its vicinity. It is only a few years 
ago that the Plaza and Central Park were prac- 
tically all the public breathing places the city had. 
Now the list is as follows: Elysian, East Los An- 
geles, Echo, Westlake, Hollenbeck, South Park, 
Central, City Hall Park, Griffith Plaza, Prospect, 
St. James, Sunset. For the maintainance of these 
parks this year the Council is asked to appropriate 
$64,220. 

Nothing could be more assuring to the real es- 
tate and business interests of Los Angeles than 
the present multiplying of manufacturing plants 
in the city. In East Los Angeles work is well ad- 
vanced on a large factory for the production of lu- 
bricating oils. The concern occupies four acres 
near the Santa Fe tracks and will be in operation 
in about two months. The consumption of lubri- 
cating oils throughout the world is enormous, and 
fortunately the California crude oil is far superior 
to the Eastern oils for lubricating purposes. 

S :* & 

Our oil men have hardly began to realize what 
a bonanza their holdings are. A barrel of crude 
oil can easily be turned into numerous manufac- 
tured products worth many times over what the 
oil is when it flows from the well. 

The rush of the manufacturers here has just 
commenced. As the tremendous advantage of 
cheap fuel in unlimited quantities becorues gen- 
erally known this city will speedily attract capital 
until it becomes one of the great industrial cen- 
ters of the United States — a Pacific Coast Pitts- 
burg. 

■ 4 .*» Jt 

Complaints come from farmers in several coun- 
ties that men looking for work, whom they would 
be glad to hire, and, in some cases, had engaged 
have been seized by country Constables on charges 
of vagrancy. The extent to which some Constables 
abuse their authority calls for immediate reform. 
A few weeks ago a lad, eighteen years of age, 
with a widowed mother to support, walked from 
this county to Ventura to obtain a promised place 
in the Santa Clara valley. Within five miles of his 
destination he was arrested by a rural Constable 
and had to spend two days in a filthy vermin in- 
fested calaboose before he was rescued. 

As a matter of fact it is not safe to walk 
through the counties of Southern California poorly 
dressed unless references are carried from some 
authority to the effect that the bearer is not a 
vagrant. The fact that the unfortunate pedestrian 
may have money in his pocket and does not ask 
for any favors is not sufficient to keep the Con- 
stable from his prey. 

& <a 

Some of the large retail establishments which 
have moved south below Third street on Broadway 
have been disappointed, and managers say frankly 
trade is not what they expected. The district be- 
tween First and Third streets still holds its own 
with no small overflow north towards Temple. So 
long as the principal financial institutions of the 



city, the Court House and City Hall, remain north 
of Third street, and the crowds which come in 
from the Southern Pacific's Commercial street sta- 
tion and the Santa Fe's First-street station, also 
from Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles, are 
mainly landed in the district named, it will be 
hard to push the business center out to Sixth 
street. New business blocks, like the Bullard, 
north of First street attract first-class tenants, 
but antiquated buildings like the Downey and 
Temple blocks will soon be deserted or turned over 
to second-hand dealers. 

,< < < 

Many hundred families in this city spend at 
least a month in summer "camping out." A more 
delightful recreation or country for such a purpose 
is- not to be found in the world. The seaside is 
the choice of the majority, but not a few enjoy the 
canyons and mountains, where the air is dry and 
exhilarating, fog does not exist and conditions of 
life seem changed for the better. In the high alti- 
tudes the "one lunger" is not at a disadvantage 
with his fellows, but the man with a weak heart 
must beware. For the latter the sea level is more 
suitable. 

A gentleman last year wrote from that famous 
camping ground of New York — the Adirondacks — 
that a summer outing there is often spoiled by the 
frequent rains. To return from a fishing or hunt- 
ing excursion in the rain, soaked to the skin, only 
to find your tent home, all its appurtenances and 
provision drenched is not cheerful. When this ex- 
perience is frequently repeated it becomes tedious. 

Such is camping in the East. In California the 
dry summer, either at the mountains or by the sea- 
side, gives a perfect climate. Renewed health, 
strength and energy is assured to those who "test 
it," and return for a season to the outdoor life of 
our ancient ancestors who rarely knew an ache 
or pain caused by disease. 

^$8 

The condition of the country round in midsum- 
mer is an interesting topic at present. A promi- 
nent dried fruit merchant a few days ago told 
the writer that he had just returned from a trip 
to San Bernardino, inspecting crops through all 
the agricultural districts. He was simply amazed 
to find in what general good care farmers are. 
Alfalfa is doing well this year and there are many 
thousand acres of this luxurious forage plant 
which is often cut as many as ten times a year. 
All sorts of garden truck is produced wherever 
there is a well and windmill. The corn crop of 
Southern California promises to be fair. 

Oranges, walnuts and grapes show every sign of 
a large crop. The money brought into the south- 
ern counties by oranges and lemons has opened 
many a bank account for growers, who hitherto 
only visited a bank as borrowers. There is a good 
crop of apples in many places. Peaches, prunes 
and pears are a comparative failure, but it is 
thought the orchards will be benefited by a year 
of rest. The trouble is attributed to an abnor- 
mally warm February, followed by cold weather in 
March. Dried fruit is low priced this year and 
those who are obliged to sell their stock at once 
will be disappointed. 

There is more hay in the country than was ex- 
pected some months ago. At this merchant's 
home place, in San Fernando, a good crop of hay 
was secured and considerable grain. 

At Artesia, southeast of Los Angeles, there has 
been lately a great find of artesian wafer which is 
to be stored in reservoirs and will irrigate a con- 
siderable section. HERBERT. 



It is all right, says a writer in the Sanitary Rec- 
ord, for the man who labors all days in the open 
air to eat freely; but the man of sedentary habits, 
the brain-worker, must adapt his way of living to 
his needs. He must be well nourished, for the 
brain is incapable of good work unless well sup- 
plied with pure blood, but such a man cannot 
possibly furnish vital force to digest three large 
meals daily. If he tries it. nature will protest at 
every step. The chemical changes of dipestion will 
be imperfectly performed. The stomach will nei- 
ther secrete freely nor churn the food with cheer- 
ful alacrity: the nyloric orifice contracts and al- 
lows such chyme to nass with prudeing reluctance: 
the intestinal lacteals are ashamed to absorb such 
miserable pabuium. which chokes, irritates, and 
congests them, so the large meal remains in the 
digestive organs to ferment, putrefy, and steep the 
individual in foul gases and depraved secretions. 
But the system can furnish enough vital force to 
convert a small meal into nabulum of hieh stan- 
dard, which will be absorbed without difficulty. 
Three such small meals are not enough to keep 
the individual properly nourished, however: four 
to six will be required. Each should consist of 
but one or at most two articles of food, the diet to 
be varied by changes at meals. The portion of 
food served must be small: the patient must stop 
as soon as the anpetite is satisfied, and gaseous 
distention is nroof positive that the meals are still 
too large or too close together. 

To the Deaf 

A .Ich lady, cured of her deafness and noises in 
the head bv Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drums, 
gave $100,000 to his Institute, so that deaf peon'e 
unable to procure the Ear Drums, mav have them 
free. Address No. 532c. The Nicholson Institute. 
780 Eighth Avenue. New York. 5-7-01 



In the 
World 



Strongest 

THE EQUITABLE 
LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY of New York 

It gives protection that protects (not for a 
day. but for all time) with a 

Surplus of over #61,000,000 

The largest held by any company on earth. 
In surplus there is strength; and from 
surplus earnings 

Dividends are Paid 

More than 

One Million Dollars 

A month was paid to our policy holders in 
1800, and almost as much in 

Living Benefits 

This great financial institution issues 5 
per cent 

Guarantee Income Bonds 

Which may be paid for on the installment 
plan. Send in your date of birth, on 
receipt of which we will mail pamphlet 
giving full discription. 



SoniiKiiN California Dki'artmk.nt 



A. M. SHIELDS, 
W. H. CKAMER 



Manager 
Cashier 
414-416-418-420 Wilcox Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



YOSEMITE 
VALLEY 

SEASON NOW OPEN 

Visit the valley early and enjoy the 
spring-tide bloom and the majesty of 
the marvelous waterfalls at their 
flood. Comfortable stages carry you 
through the great forests of the 
Sierras to this wonderland and there 
arc first-class hotels for your accom- 
modation. Any agent of the South- 
ern Pacific Company will make reser- 
vation and give you full particulars 
concerning the trip to the Yosemite 
and the companion marvel 

MARIPOSA 
BIG TREES 

Special rates from Los Angeles and 
Southern California to Yosemite and 
return, with special sleepers. 
Inquire at or address 

Southern Pacific Co. 

261 S. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Longo 



The Ladies' and Gentlemen's 

Has now the handsomest establishment of 
its kind in Southern California at 

222 S. Broadway 

It is in accord with the reputation of his 
Garments. They are the recognized 
Standard 



Long 



'Is "Tailor 



o Gentlemen' 



14 



Western Graphic 



Amorvg the Mvimmers 

In the Eyes &f the Critic- -Coming Events 



FOR another week the Orpheum has occupied 
the royal position of exclusive entertainer 
to the people of Los Angeles, a commission 
it is qualified to undertake without notice. And 
contrary to the usual inclinations of monopolies, 
give the patrons of the house the best there is 
in the box. 

About the greatest treat that could be imagined 
was the appearance of the four Cohans, undeni- 
ably the greatest quartette of comedians in the 
world, and being father, mother, son and daugh- 
ter, and owing to the fact that the son, Geo. M., 
is a playwright and composes the songs for his 
own farces, theirs is an ideal combination of 
talent. "The Governor's Son" is the title of the 
Cohans' offering this week, and a more uproarious 
half hour of fun was never thought of. The story 
begins with a spat between Benjamin Curtis, elder- 
ly, just married and jealous, and his wife, who 
wants to flirt and doesn't know it. Then appears 
Mrs. Dickson, a bride of two weeks, looking for a 
husband who went out to take a drink the first 
day and never came back. The head confusionist 
then appears in the person of Algy Wheelock, 
the only son of a governor, who makes an im- 
pression upon Mrs. Curtis and is later induced by 
Mr. Curtis to undertake a flirtation with the lady 
to discover the quantity and quality of her affec- 
tion for him. Now the mix-up begins. Algy 
makes love to Mrs. Dickson, under the impression 
that she is Mrs. Curtis, and upon learning from her 
that her husband's father was a bank robber and 
his brothers cattle thieves, throws up his job as a 
masher-detective. By a series of exits and en- 
trances the characters are brought on the stage 
so that each one sees each of the others alone; 
and in the ensuing dialogue Algy is led to believe 
that Dickson has married both the women, and 
that Mrs. Dickson is blessed with two husbands. 
Of course they all share proportionately in the 
polygamous misunderstanding, and the rapidly 
changing situations cause one continuous convul- 
sion of laughter. George and Miss Josephine 
Cohan introduce some original songs and several 
whirls of their inimitable dancing during the 
piece. 

The other new number on the bill is an acro- 
batic act by the Todd-.Iudge family, a man and two 
boys of wonderful physical development. While 
their work is of the sterotyped form of tumbling, 
it is withal so graceful and is accomplished with 
such apparent ease that they hold the house until 
the final curtain — a good act indeed! Gilbert and 
Goldie throw in a few new jokes this week; Dale 
introduces nearly all new melodies on his bells; 
Sullivan and Webber give the same skit as last 
week under a new name; and Carrington. Holland 
and Galpin repeat their operatic and comedy skit. 

(.^ 

Cues for the Public 

ON Sunday evening, July 29th, the Burbank 
will reopen with the Neill company, which 
comes from Honolulu after a very successful season, 
for a five weeks' engagement to be followed by Mo- 
rosco's stock company for an extended season. Dur- 
ing the month of December the Burbank theater 
has booked Stranger in New York, Idol's Eye, A 
Wise Guy, and two weeks Oi novelty opera. Janu- 
ary will bring A Stranger in a Strange Land, 
Telephone Girl and Town Topics. February, 
Frawley company; April, Neill company; and 
June, Morosco's New York company till August. 
It is an interesting fact that from the opening of 
the Neill engagement the Burbank is booked solid 
until 1902, enabling the unpopular young man to 
make an er ™agement with the popular young 
lady, even though it should be a year or more 
hence. 

J* .* ,* 

Jeannie Winston, an old time comic opera favor- 
ite, joined the Fricks opera company in Sacra- 
mento this week. 

■* :< <.* 

About one of the most startling breaks into 
vaudeville is that of George Clarke, who for 
years and years was with Augustin Daly's com- 
pany. Mr. Clarke is such a delightful actor that 
he cannot give anything but a good performance, 
but it will be interesting to note how Daly methods 
go in vaudeville. 

,< & 

It is announced that Sara Bernhardt will re- 
ceive $1000 for every performance during her com- 
ing American tour, and that Coquelin will get the 
beggarly pittance of four hundren "per." This is 
a very poor showing for American managers to 
make when it is remembered that the late Henry 
Abbey lost many a bright sixteen to one simo- 
lian on each of these great French artists several 
years ago, when they gave us fine perform- 
ances with the worst equipment of scenery and 
appointments ever seen in this country. Every- 
body who knows anything about the peerless 
Sara is aware that she is worth much more than a 
thousand a performance, and will be pleased to 



know that both she and "Coky" get a share of the 
profits in addition to these meagre salaries. 

James O'Neill will use the celebrated Fichter 
version of Monte Cristo next season. 

< .< 

A correspondent writing of the dramatic repre- 
sentation of the life of Christ in the Oberammer- 
gau Passion Play, says that the production this 
year is considerably modernized. The town is 
now accessible by means of a railway, and a new 
theater has been completed. As before the stage 
is open to the sky, while the orchestra sits below 
the stage and is hidden from view. The new thea- 
ter is a great improvement over the former one. 
Now there is a roof over the seats of the audi- 
ence. In the old theater on rainy days the visitors 
were compelled to sit under umbrellas throughout 
the performance. Joseph Mayr, the former im- 
personator of Christ, now an old man with gray 
beard, is the leader of the chorus. The character 
of Christ is now impersonated by Anton Lang. 
He is only twenty-six years old, has light hair 
and light beard with a beautiful, seraphic face. 
He acted with much dignity and grace, but in 
other respects can not compare with Mayr. 
Bertha Wolf, as Mary, cannot compare with her 
predecessor, Rosa Lang, who, by the way, is now 
in a convent near Vienna. 

I must also record a feeling of disappointment 
regarding the acting of Judas. . Not even in the 
wonderful scenes before the sanhedrin, when he 
spurned their thirty pieces of silver, did he im- 
press me as favorably as ten years ago. His 
monologue before committing suicide was spoken 
in a decided monotone and a weak voice. Peter 
Rpndl, as John, however, made a very favorable 
impression, as he did in 1890. 

"Following in rapid succession came the marvel- 
ous scenes of Christ before Pilate, the scourgings, 
the bearing of the cross to Golgotha and the won- 
derfully realistic crucifixion scene. 

"Hardly a breath was heard, and only now and 
then a sob came from the audience. From many 
eyes flowed tears when Christ uttered the words: 
'My God, why hast Thou forsaken me?' Then 
Joseph of Arimathea and the few faithful stepped 
forward and gently removed the body from the 
cross just as in Ruben's famous painting. The 
resurrection scene was also most impressive. 
Christ rose from his tomb, clothed in a silver gar- 
ment. The chorus closed with a grand finale, 
singing: 

"All victorious! All victorious! 
All His enemies' might He vanquished 
From the tomb in which He languished. 
Immortality all glorious 

He has brought to light." 
Jl & t * 

Orpheum 

With a clear field next week, the Orpheum is 
certain to enjoy a'nother week of big business, such 
as has been its portion for many months. After 
the fine entertainment one finds on the stage at 
the Orpehum, the most interesting feature in 
theatricals is the constantly crowded houses which 
vaudeville bills attract. 

Next week there will be six new acts exploited, 
This will constitue almost an entirely new bill. 
The Four Cohans will begin their last week on 
Monday appearing in George Cohan's furiously 
funny farce. "Running for Office." 

The Quaker City Quartette, said to be the finest 
in the land, is first on the list of newcomers. 

Then is featured Jules and Barrere. French 
acrobats; Smith and Fuller, a musical team; Stella 
Mayhew, a clever singer of negro songs, and Mrs. 
Blitz Paxton, a San Francisco society singer, who 
makes her vaudeville debut on Monday evening. 
The Todd-Judge family of acrobats will be held 
over another week. 



When a man comes home and tries to bolt the 
door with a sweet potato, pokes the fire with the 
spout of the coffee pot. attempts to wind up the 
clock with his boot-jack, tries to cut kindling for 
his morning's fire with an ivory paper knife, takes 
a cold boiled potato in his hand to light him to 
bed, and prefers to sleep in his boots and hat. you 
may reasonably infer that he has been making 
the acquaintance of some very friendly people. 

How few of us are really our own boss! The 
married men are subject to their wives, the bache- 
lors obey their sweethearts, the old maids cater to 
their cats and poodles, while all of us bow to that 
weak thing called public opinion. We come into 
the world without our consent, we leave with a 
protest, and while here kick at everything that 
crosses our path but all to no purpose. The old 
world wags on, not caring whether we live or die, 
laugh or cry, shout or sigh, not caring why, till 
we turn up our toes and die. 

While there is life there is hope for everybody 
but the undertaker. 




MAIN 8TEEET 
BET. FIE8T 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing Honday, July 23 

Ouaker Cit y Ouartette, in Fun in a Barber Shop 
Smith and Fuller, Far-famed Musical Artists 
Mrs. Blltz-Paxton, Society Vocalist 

Bar' ere and Jules, Parallel aud Horizontal Bar performers 

Stella ftlayhew, Clever singer of Coon 8ongs 

4 Conns George M.. Josephine, Helen F., Jerry J., presenting 

"Running for Office" Farewell week 
Todd-Judge Family Most marvelous acrobats on earth 

PRICES never changing— 25c and 50c: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 

Imperial Co ™dc H { Al 



Family Restaurant' 
and Oyster Parlors.** 

243 S. SPRING STREET •■><! 

Phone IOI 242 s. broadwav... 

Grand Concerts daily from 12 noon to 1.30 p. m. 

6 to 7 and K to 12 evenings. Orchestra under direction J 

of P. J. Franks, late of Chicago. Everything first-class. X 

The»»er Parties a Specialty 35 

HAI.MER & PUTZMAN, Managers. £ 



CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

Room 20 J, 223 W. Second St., Los Angeles 
Tel. Main 1415 Membership F«e 50 cents 

Books rented at 5 cents the week - 5 cents for delivery 

Seventy-five Cents worth of Magazines rented for 25 Cents j 
Five 10-cent Magazines rented for 20 cents. One you keep I 
For $3.75 we rent you five 10-cent Magazines the month, 
and give you a year's subscription to the 
Western Graphic 

Subscriptions taken for all Publications 
All leading Coast and Eastern Papers on File. 



ED U CATIONAL 

I Brownsberger 
Home School .... 

Shorthand and Typewriting 4 

903 South Broadway. T«l. White 4871 ? 

^ This institution owns the largest number w 
J of typewriters of any school in California j; 

I 
| 

t SPECIAL SUMHER RATES | 

4-4-4 4-4-4-4-4 ***************** 4 4 4-4 ***** 

i 
# 



typewriters of any 

1 Touch method in typewriting exclusively. More posi- 
y tions are offered to the school at a good salary than 
we can fill. Only individual work. Office training. 
Machine at home free. Hours 9 to 12; 1 30 to 4.30 



) tosfoge/es S^nn v 

eg) ix^dM^tXeQ^J 

318 W. Third St. Tel. Black 2651 

OldeBt, largest and best training school in the city. 
Thorough, practical courses of study in Bookkeeping, 
Shorthand, Typewriting and Telegraphy. College 
trained and experienced teachers. Best equipped 
Business College room West ot Chicago. This is the 
only school in the city that has the right of using the 
Budget of Voucher System of Bookkeeping. Come and 
see it. Our students have the advantage of Spanish, 
German and Lou V. Chapin's Course of Lectures free. 
It will cost you nothing to investigate the merits of 
our school before going elsewhere. Special rates for 
the summer. Catalogue and full information on ap- 
plication. Address 

L.. A. Business College, 213 W. Third St., L. A. 



Los Angeles 



I Military Academy J 

Begins its seventh year September 25th. \ 
Classical, English and Scientific Courses. 
The common branches thoroughly taught. 
Prepares for business. 

Sanford A. Hooper, Head Master 
Edward L. Hardy, Associate 
Catalogue mailed upon request. Visitors 
take Westlake (First street) Traction cars. 

Los Angeles School 
ol Dramatic Art . . . 

Training for the Platform, Pulpit and Stage. Cultivation of 
the Speaking Voice for every purpose. 

Directors— G. A. Dobinson, John I). Hooker, W. C. Patter- 
son, B. R. Baumgardt, Sheldon Borden. 

The Art Building, 614 S. Hill St., IrfM Alleles 

The practical experience of an actress in her art 
is usually far in advance of her advertised youth- 
fulness. 



Incorporated Sept. 1899 
Tel. James 711 



Western Graphic 



L5 



Music a. rv d Art 



Continued from puge 7 



But this does not mean that trashy stuff which 
masquerades as "sacred" music, illegal and weak 
in its musical structure, nerveless and senseless 
parodies upon good models, must be acepted with- 
out question. For this the choir must be held ac- 
countable, the more so as there is limitless ma- 
terial to be drawn on in the writings of the great 
composers of opera and oratorio alike. Handel, 
and many others of his and an earlier day, in- 
terchanged their melodies, and some of the most 
beautiful airs of Handel's religious works were 
either re-adapted from his own operas or were 
pilfered from those of others. He justified himself 
in this course, and he undoubtedly polished the 
jewels he culled, but even he did not escape the 
sneers of the incapables of his day. The very 
idea of setting "Deborah" to music scandalized 
the Pietists, who applauded the operas of Bonon- 
cini and the canzonets of Arrigoni. Ever since 
then the ordinary church service has broadened 
out and filled itself up with whatever it coulr" 
find in the secular field of music, until today a 
church music program has as many colors as the 
coat of Joseph. 

E. F. KUBEL. 

t}£ 

The music for the annual convention of the 
Chautauqua Society now in session at Long Beach 
is under the supervision of Mr. William James 
Chick of Los Angeles. On Monday evening last a 
concert was given in the pavilion by a chorus con- 
sisting of sixty voices and Mr. Chick, barytone, 
Mr. Lienau, tenor, Arthur Marshall Perry, violin- 
ist, and W. W. Ellis, accompanist. This concert 
formally inaugurated the opening of the Chau- 
tauqua season. The Thursday evening musical 
program was provided by the ladies' orchestra of 
Los Angeles under the direction of Harley Hamil- 
ton, assisted by Miss Mollie Adelia Brown, solo 
soprano. On this Saturday evening will take place 
the final concert under Mr. Chick's direction, Car- 
lysle Petersilia being the piano soloist of the oc- 
casion. Mrs. Thomas Watson Young of the Los 
Angeles School of Dramatic Art will give a read- 
ing and the remainder of the musical program 
will be provided by H. Russell Ballard, cellist, Mrs. 
Grace Henderson Matthewson, soprano, and Mr." 
Chick, barytone. 

& £ 

One of the most interesting musical antiquities 
in existence has lately become the property of a 
New York lady, Marie Glover-Miller, the singer. It 
is no less than the harp of Tom Moore, and is 
the self-same instrument upon which he composed 
"The Harp That Once Through Tara's Halls," 
"The Meeting of the Waters," "Go Where Glory 
Waits Thee," and "The Last Rose of Summer." 
The harp is 135 years old, is about three feet in 
height and is still a beautiful instrument. The 
compass comprises thirty notes and has no pedals. 

Arrangements have been made by C. L. Graeff, 
who was the manager of the Damrosch-Gadski- 
Bispham recitals that created such interest here 
last season, for a tour of America with Madame 
Marcel la Sembrich. After the successful engage- 
ment of the former trio of artists in this city, we 
may confidently expect to be permitted to hear 
Madame Sembrich. 

Much has been written of Miss Amelia Kussner, 
the young miniature painter, who, as the princi- 
pal beneficiary of Rosa Bonheur's will, fell heir 
to a considerable fortune. As a girl she was 
brought up in the living rooms back of her father's 
music store in Pittsburg. And now she is married 
to Captain Charles du Point Cou:lert, the ceremony 
being entirely unexpected and very quiet. Mrs. 
Coudert will not be called upon to renounce her 
art for love. Her soldier husband is thoroughly 
in sympathy with her ambition. While abroad she 
will paint miniatures of the Princess of Wales and 
the Emperor of Germany. 

J* v* & 

The telegraphic dispatches received this week to 
the effect that cholera has claimed 10,000 victims 
in the famine districts of India have aroused a 
new interest in the suffering millions of India and 
in the benefit that is to be given July 24, at 
Blanchard hall, the entire proceeds will be sent to 
the starving millions across the water. Not only 
have Joseph Scott, the speaker of the evening, and 
the artists donated their services, but also Mr. 
Blanchard has given the use of his hall and Mr. 
Bartlett has contributed a piano for the evening. 
The entertainment, which has been arranged under 
the auspices of the Castro School of Languages, in- 
cludes musical numbers by the following: C. S. 
De Lano's Guitar, Mandolin and Banjo Club; Mrs. 
Frank Bryson, Misses Zulu Baker, Roberta Mer- 
ritt, Grace Clark, Adeline N. Meek, Jessie Good- 
win, Grace Freeby, Blanche A. Kottmeir, Mrs. 
Kannon, Arthur Marshall Perry, A. J. Stamm, Ed. 
Kuster, Earnest L. Bowen and the new Mexican 
Band under the leadership of Y. Escobar. This 
band will at this time make its first public appear- 
ance. 

& J* & 

The officers elected by the Treble Clef Club for 
the ensuing year are: Mrs. C. H. White, Presi- 
dent; Mrs. Thomas W. Goss, Mrs. W. J. Scholl, 



Mrs. C. C. Wright, Mrs. L. W. Merrick, Mrs. F. A. 
Du'y, Mrs. W. R. Bacon, Vice-Presidents; Mrs. B. 
H. Heinemann, Secretary; Mrs. F. S. Munson, 
Treasurer; Mrs. M. E. Scoville, Librarian; Miss 
Amelia Grosser, Assistant Librarian; Madame Isi- 
dora Martinez, Musical Director; Miss Ada Sho- 
walter. Accompanist. The weekly meetings of th> 
club have been adjourned for the summer months 
and will be resumed on the first Tuesday in Octo- 
ber, at Ebell Hall, when they will take up for 
active study several new compositions written spe- 
cially for women's voices. 

The summer vacation of the new Ladies' Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra, Madame Isidora Martinez, 
Musical Director, will extend to the first Friday in 
September, when regular weekly rehearsals will 
recommence at Ebell Hall. In addition to two 
special musical functions of largo magnitude prom- 
ised for early in December, there will be a series 
of orchestral concerts given by the Philharmonic 
during the season of 1900-1901. 

The celebration of the one hundred and eleventh 
anniversary of the fall of the Bastile, at Elks' 
Hall, on Saturday evening of last week, brought 
together a highly cosmopolitan audience, which 
mingled and commingled in true fraternal spirit. 
The divine muse, as a matter of course, was a lead- 
ing factor in kindling the fires of enthusiasm and 
good will. Miss Knickerbocker, Miss Narcisse 
Sentous, M. Dupuy, Sr., Eugene Roth and the 
Schoneman-Blanchard orchestra, furnished the 



Hollenbeck Park 

Sunday evening, 7:30 p. m.. at Hollenbeck Park: 
Grand march, "Hail Columbia" W. P. Chambers 

Waltz. Marion" Eilenberg 

Selection. "Bohemian Girl" Balfe 

Concert polka. "The Anvil" Parlow 

Medley, "Clorindy" Marion 

Potpourri. Coster Songs Chevelier 

An Indian War Dance Belstedt 

Medley, introducing "Sweet, Sweet Ixive," "In 

Dear Old London" Mackie 

Waltz, "Zenda" Wltmark 

March, "Hands Across the Sea" Sousa 

"America" 

Green and yellow Traction cars run direct to 
park. 



The following letter was written by a father to 
his son at college: My dear son — I write to send 
you your new socks, which your mother has just 
knit by cutting down some of mine. Your mother 
sends you ten dollars without my knowledge, and 
for fear you would not spend it wisely, I kept back 
half and only send you five. Your own mother and 
I are well, except that your sister has the 
measles, which we think would spread among the 
girls if Tom had not had them and he is the only 
one left. I hope you will do honor to my teach- 
ing; if you do not your are a donkey and your 
mother and myself are your affectionate parents. 




UNITED STATES BATTLESHIP OREGON. 

The battleship Oregon struck on an uncharted rock near Chefu, on the Chinese coast, 
and first reports were to the effect that she would be a total loss. These reports were sub- 
sequently modified, hut it was said three months would be required to release the sliip. 
She got enough of the adventure in less than a week. The Oregon had been at Hong- 
kong, where she had been undergoing some minor repairs. She was ordered to join the 
allied fleet at Taku and was carrying out that order when she went aground. Her com- 
mander is Captain George F. F. Wilde. The Oregon was built at the Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, and was launched October 26, 189,'i. She took a leading part in the defeat, 
of Cervera's fleet at Santiago, but her greatest fame rests upon the sailing record she made 
from the Pacific to the Atlantic This record-breaking voyage was made early in 1898, 
during the war with Spain. Captain Charles E. Clark received orders to bring his ship, the 
Oregon, from northern Pacific waters to join the North Atlantic squadron and to use his 
own judgment in so doing. He left Pnget Sound on March fi and anchored at Key West on 
May 26. Th' good ship made the voyage of 17,499 miles in 81 days, the longest and fastest 
trip ever m; i by a war vessel. The voyage included an unequaled run of 4,500 knots 
without a stoi between San Francisco and Callao, a run of 2,484 knots at an average speed 
of 13 knots, and a spurt of 155 knots in 10 hours. 



musical features of the program in a most accept- 
able manner, arousing hearty applause. 
JC „* 

Elks' Hall presented a very dusky, not to say 
sombre appearance last Tuesday evening. While 
it is true that here and there a splash of white, 
or yellow, stood out from the surrounding dark- 
ness with startling vividness, yet the violence of 
the contrast served only to enhance and deepen 
the blackness. It was the gathering of Los An- 
geles' colored four hundred to hear members of 
their own elite in song and dance, that was re- 
sponsible for the mourning appearance of the hall. 
Color aside, the occasion was anything else but a 
gloomy one, as was evinced by the enthusiasm of 
those present. 

d£ v?^ 

Wcstlake Park 

Program for concert by Southern California 
Hand at Westlake Park Sunday afternoon, July 22, 
1900, at 2:30 p. m.: 

Grand march, "Niebelungen" Wagner 

Waltz. "The Charlatan" Sousa 

Selection, "Maritana" Wallace 

Fantasia, "The Ambuscade" Laurendoau 

Romanza. "Asleep in the Deep" Petrie 

Solo for Baritone, E. M. Griffin. 

Medley of Popular Songs A. B. Sloane 

Idylle, "In Beauty's Bower" Hendix 

Potpourri, "Irish Songs" Moore 

Gavotte, "Love's Answer" O'Hara 

American overture Tobani 



The prize in the matrimonial lottery is often 
drawn in a perambulator. 



John Wanamaker says: I do the heaviest ad- 
vertising in dull times. Then it is when people 
look most keenly for bargains and are anxious to 
know what things cost and where they can save 
money. I advertise particular things, give prices 
and take as much pains with my announcement 
as I do with my stock. One big dinner won't keep 
up the reputation of the house — but steady cook- 
ing does it. I never permit interest to lag and 
never miss an issue in my chosen publications. 
Advertising has made my store one of the largest 
in the country. 

< ■ < ■< 

She longs for a dip in the salty sea, 
Though at swimming she isn't a crack; 

But her suit is cut with a great big V 

In front, and another one down the back. 

MUSICAL PRINTING 

TOP NOTCH S I VI. i s 

Concert Programs, Announcement Folders, Fine Engraving 
Best Stationery 

WESTERN GRAPHIC, 
Tel Main 1063 til New High street 

PHYSICIANS AM) si BGXONS 

TITIAN JAMES COFFEY iiours-10-12 a.m. 

2-4 p.m. 

306 30S WILCOX BUILDING Office Tel., Main 179 

Res. Tel., White 6011 Rbsidknck: 919 8. UNION AVE 

D. CAVE 

LAN K KRKIIIM BLOCK 
126 West Third Htrcet 



Tel. Main 1515 



Puritas Root Beer 



The beverage that pleases the palate. 
pints^iTo ICE & COLD STORAGE CO. 



The children's especial favorite 
Tel. Main 228 



: 




BRIGADIER GENERAL ADNA R. CHAFFEE. 
Brigadier Gener.d Adna K. Chaffee, who commands the United States land foroes ii 
China, is a veteran of several wars. He began his military career as a private in Conipanj 
K of the Sixth regular cavalry. This was in 18H1, when he was 19 year* of age. He serve* 
through the civil war, coming out a first sergeant. In 1807 he was advanced to the rank o' 
captain. He distinguished himself in the Indian wars, and by 1888 had advanced to th< 
rank of lieutenant colonel. He was made colonel of the Eighth cavalry at the beginning 
of the Spanish war. Since the close of that war he has been appointed brigadier general 
of volunteers. In 1899 he served as chief of staff to the governor general of Cuba. 



HOTEL 
DILWONTE 



In every detail and in all its 
Envionment Ideally 
Californian 




The Most riagnificent Hotel 
The Most Expansive Landscape 
The Most Varied Forests 
The Most Delightful Temperature 
The Most Superb Flowers 



IN ALL 

AMERICA 



One hundred and twenty=six acres of cultivated 
ground, and almost the whole of the Peninsula 
of Honterey for a playground 



Send for Illustrated pamphlet to any agent 
or the Southern Pacific Company, 
of for special monthly rates, write 



W. A. JUNKER 



MANAGER 



HARTFORD OIL COMPANY 



8 
■ 

S 
■ 

8 




UR MR. H. C. DILLON has just returned from our McKittrick 
Well and reports satisfactory progress. The drill will soon be drop- 
ping and our stock will then make another advance. He confirms 
strike of oil on sections 2-32 22, and says the great midway oil field 
between Sunset and McKittrick is being mpidly occupied with der- 
ricks and sure to be a great producer of high grade oil. 



Block of Shares at 127cts* 



Will Soon be Exhausted 



J. S. DILLON 
H. C. DILLON 



President 
Secretary 



CURRIER BLOCK 

212 West Third Street 



I A. R. MAINES MFG. CO. 

435 S. Spring St., Los Angeles. 



Orient 
1 Bicvcles 



SIX HODELS 

•tP i? To Choose From 



Absolutely the Best bicycle 
in the Market . . . 



Women's Pacific 




Coast Oil Co. 

IINCOKI'ORATtD 



Capital $300,000 
Stock 



Fully paid and Non-assessable 
Par Value $1.00 

An Open Letter to Our Stockholders 

SUMMERLAND, CAL., JULY 6, 1900. 

Women's Pacific Coast Oil Co., Lou Angelen. Oat. 

Ladies:— Contract for Hickey A Robinson received and delivered, i nave to report 
that work is begun on the derrick, and that the drillers expect to he able to begin drill- 
ing next Tuesday. It will be necessary for you to buy and ship the 7'' B casing at once. 
I presume the best thiit can be done with he notice given will be to get it started on 
the freight Monday. I told them I would write to you today, ordering you to ship it, 
and that seemed to be satisfactory to them. I am very sincerely yours, 

DWIGHT KEMHTON. 



334 Copp Building, 218 S. Broadway 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



'Ii dim- John 1 1 S 1 



GEO. RICE & SONS. (Inc.) LOS ANGELES. 



WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

<Jln Illustrated Family Weekly of the Sovithwest 

W ITU WHICH IS C|0 N 8 O I. 1 I) A T B 1) X II EE L () S A N U E LBS B I" N I) A Y W O B L D A N I> CAI. IFOKNIA CURIO 

ffilESSS. ? x x . v,,, |No.4. Los Angeles, Saturday, July 28, 1900. Price 10 Cents 





MAVMRO-COLIIIM 1*0. 



"THE PILLAR OF SMOKE " 
Taken aborc the lire in the tterra Uadres, Jtilj 38, 1900 



WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

Jin Illustrated Family Weekly of (fie Southwest 

WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED THE 

SUNDAY WORLD and CALIFORNIA CURIO 



OEO. RIC E & S ONS, (Inc.) 

published every saturday morning at 
811-313 New High Street Telephone Main 1053 

■ NTfllfO AT fM LOt ANQfLII FOIT OFFICt »» SECONO-CL A St MATTM 

SUBSCRIPTIONS— Three Dollars a Year; or. Twenty five cents 
a month, collected by Remittance Card system, all postage paid 
bv the publishers. 

CONTRIBUIIONS—We pay cash for accepted contributions, 
those containing photographs for reproduction being most avail- 
able. The usual rules regarding manuscripts xhould be observed 
to insure consideration. 

T5he Editor's Say 

DIOGENES is on the warpath, and it matters 
not if there be forty-six Rubicons on Broad- 
way between First and Second streets — for 
it is not necessary to cross even one. Paper 
is cheap, ink is made in Diogenes' own stronghold, 
and the pen is mightier than the sword — and much 
safer for the wielder. 

It must be suggested that mythology is being 
brought down to date in a most startling way, and 
the lexicographers and ethnologists will needs con- 
fer and bring order out of this chaos of titles which 
are conferred or appropriated with such surprising 
frequency. 

The hero of battles on both sides of the sea has 
taken a fall out of his new enemy, and the enemy 
has warned him not to do it again. 

Whoop! i The whoop should be given at a dis- 
tance of ten miles.] 

Just what to think of the Chinese situation is as 
hard for a man who reads as it seems to be for 
the statesmen and diplomats who direct the des- 
tinies of the nations of the world. The sifting 
of reliable information from the mass of conflict- 
ing reports is a task that no one pretends to be able 
to undertake. As this is written grim and terri- 
ble war appears to be inevitable — a war of the 
world against China. The assurances from the 
Flowery Kingdom that the ministers and their 
families are alive and safe are now mistrusted by 
the authorities at Washington, the last of the 
powers to doubt the authenticity of Minster Con- 
gers message. The United States is exerting every 
energy in preparing for the conflict, and when the 
clash of arms comes in real earnest there will be 
a thousand Chinese corpses as the price of each 
life taken in cold blood at Peking. The vengeance 
of civilization cannot but be appalling. The brut- 
ishness, the treachery and the fiendishness of the 
mongols will undoubtedly drive the soldiers of 
the allied arms to extreme slaughter; then will 
their retribution be visited upon the murderers of 
innocents. 

There has been enough to prove that absolutely 
no reliance can be placed in statements from any 
Chinese source, for the truth is not in them and 
villainy is their pleasure. It is time for the civil- 
ized nations to shoot their bolt. 

,< Jt :•* 

It is a poor American who can contemplate the 
imgnificent condition of the commerce of this na- 
tion without a burst of pride and patriotism. The 
foreign trade of the United States, for the fiscal 
year just ended, amounted to almost two and a 
quarter billion dollars, and was the largest in our 
history. Imports amounted to $849,714,329. and the 
exports of American products and manufactures 
were $1,394,479,214. The aggregate figures of our 
foreign trade reached $2,244,193,543. 

Compared with previous years, the imports of 
the 1900 fiscal year have been exceeded only once, 
in 1893. when they were $16,700,000 larger. The 
value of our exports last year has never been ex- 
ceeded, the largest previous total being for 1898. 
"•hen they were $163,000,000 less than in the year 
just ended. 

Another interesting comparison is the following, 
showing how the foreign trade of the United States 
compares with that of Great Britain and of Ger- 
many, the figures for the two latter countries be- 
ing for the calendar year ending December 31, 
1^99. while those for the United States are for the 
fircal year ending June 30, 1900: 

Country. Imports. Exports. 

Oeat Britain $2,360,619,989 $1,289,971,039 

Germany t.236,888,380 949.957.960 

Unit"rl States 849,714,329 1,394.479,214 

The imports of the u nited States are the small- 
est, and our exports are the largest. Therefore our 
trade must he the most favorable. 

Last year Great Britain had an unfavorable trade 
balance that exceeded a billion dollars. Germany's 
unfavorable trade balance amounted to $286,930.- 
420. But the trade balance in favor of the United 
States amounted to $544,764,885. 

The Sunset Telephone and Telegraph Company 
is receiving a small dose of good medicine in Seat- 
tle by the girl operators going on a strike for bet- 
ter wages. It is a convincing commentary on the 
grasping methods of this Pacific Coast monopoly 
when meek and easily satisfied girls are roused to 



the point of risking their bread and butter in de- 
fense of their rights as human beings. It is a well- 
known fact that the wages of the young women 
who slave at the exchange boards of the telephone 
company are pitifully small, and in this fact may- 
be found the chief cause for the unsatisfactory 
service of the Los Angeles system. Girls whose 
qualifications do not admit of their employment in 
other lines, others who temporarily accept the pit- 
tance offered by the telephone management, and 
some whose general inability to do anything causes 
them to be satisfied, comprise the classes of em- 
ployees that users of the telephone know under 
the general title of "central." The secluded re- 
spectability of the work is an element that draws 



many girls to servitude in the telephone office — 
girls who shrink from such public employment as 
store clerks, etc. 

The business men of Los Angeles have long since 
become contented to pay "all the traffic will bear" 
for every public utility and with but an ordinarily 
decent service would not complain of the enor- 
mous tolls they are obliged to pay for the exasper- 
ating hello machine. New York City is on the 
eve of being rescued from the grasp of the tele- 
phone trust of that city by the entrance of an inde- 
pendent company., which starts off with 10,000 con- 
tracts with subscribers. This suggests an opening 
for the profitable investment of the surplus income 
of some of our new oil kings. 



Notebook and Camera 

Personalities and Happenings ^ ^ 



AS an example of young men who are ambi- 
tious to climb the ladder of success, a short 
resume of the rapid advance of Harry Thax- 
ter will be of interest. After taking a course at 
Stanford, he entered the electrical department at 
Terre Haute, and on his return home, filled a lower 
position with the Los Angeles Railway Company, 
climbing from one position to another. For the 
past three years he has been connected with the 
Edison Electric Company, filling various positions, 
but for some time he has been General Superin- 
tendent for the company. Personally. Mr. Thax- 
ter is a man whom it is a pleasure to meet. His 
rapid advance has not caused him to "feel his 
oats," and though but a young man he fills a most 
important position, with many heavy responsibili- 
ties, with perfect satisfaction. In speaking with a 
Graphic reporter he said. "I don't think you want 
an interview with me. What I have done does 
not amount to much. I have always tried to fill 
the position I occupied to the best of my ability, 
and if it required extra hours to complete my task. 
I was ever ready to stay with it. I have always 
believed there was a place at the top for any young 
man who went after it, and I have adhered to the 
idea, and went after it, neglecting no detail." 
J* t .4 

In the old days, when Los Angeles was but a 
little town, the better element wanted a staunch 
man for Mayor, and the selection fell on Wm. H. 
Workman. After the nomination, a number of 
his friends decided to give him a grand banquet, 
and as "Billy" was of a good natured disposition, 
thought to make him "pay the fiddler." A com- 
mittee of one waited on him, outlining a supper that 
was to cost $50 a plate, and suggested that he 
should pay for his place. The price seemed a bit 
high to the Mayor-elect, but he gave his word that 



our picture shows, is still a robust man, and is a 
prominent figure on our streets and in business 

circles. 




WM. H. WORKMAN 

he would be on hand. The banquet was a success, 
and on leaving Mr. Workman gave the committee- 
man a check for $50, but the laugh turned the 
other way. for when the boys went down to the 
bank to cash the check, which by the way covered 
the entire expense of the spread, their faces 
lengthened several degrees when the cashier 
handed the check back, telling them he did not 
know of any Wm. H. Wakeman, for the wily 
Mayor had so signed the check. Mr. Workman, as 




HAUKV THAXTKR 

The wonderful activity of the human brain when 
called upon to exert its powers, is a thing to be 
proud of. In the society news of this week ap- 
pears an announcement of the engagement of a 
young American girl, just out of school, to a cer- 
tain Count of the French "Court." As it is several 
moons since the French people enjoyed the luxury 
of so expensive and spectacular an evil, with its 
attendant social and class heart-burnings, and we 
might add depravity, it is not an easy matter for 
a mind of ordinary every day capacity at the first 
blush to perhaps grasp the true meaning of the 
announcement. It reads straight enough, and 
leaves the impression that there really is an im- 
perial "court" in France at the present moment, 
chuck full of royalty and things, together with 
this identical Count when he is "te hum." There 
is, however, one peculiar feature in the announce- 
ment that might cast some doubt upon the cor- 
rectness of such an interpretation, and that is, the 
use of a small "c" in court, instead of a capital. 
It may be that the small "c" was used advisedly, 
and that after all, M. Le Compte is a distinguished 
attache of some legal tribunal in France. If this 
explanation of the use of the small "c" is correct, 
we ought to know it at once. It is hardly the 
fair thing for Mr. Count to come over here and 
ruthlessly tear from the tender and loving bosom 
Of the American people, one of our sweet girllets 
just out of school, without some little effort on his 
part to allay the torturing, anxieties and fears of 
this great nation as to the future social status of 
his fiancee. 

.*< .< .< 

If the Los Angeles Exchange has a sub-commit- 
tee on "Good of the Industry" a field of operation 
exists in the squelching of the doubtful enterprise 
of a Spring-street haberdasher who advertises to 
give away a share of oil stock with every pair of 
socks, every collar and every collar button sold. 
Nothing tends to bring more ridicule and discredit 
upon the industry than petty schemes of this sort 
and up to this time the city has been fortunate in 
their non-exisetnce; now that it is started no one 
knows to what extent it will be carried unless 
immediately sat upon. A peremptory "request" by 
the exchange that this practice be discontinued 
will, we believe, have the desired effect as, espe- 
cially in this instance, the trade and influence 
of the oi! men is a factor to be reckoned with. 

' With presumptuous effrontery H. Gaylord Wil- 
shire appears before the City Council with a pe- 
tition to change the ordinance regulating the 
height of billboards from a maximum of six feet 
to ten feet. It is a pretty time, after he has been 
whipped through all the courts, to seek the consid- 
eration of the representatives of the people whose 
wishes and mandates he has outraged in such an 



Western Graphic 



3 



arrogant fashion. Even if it were not enough that 
Mr. Wilshire has made himself persona non grata 
with the law-makers of the city, there is no good 
reason why he should be given the privilege of a 
continuous defacement of the landscape of Los An- 
geles. As the billboards are at present they sim- 
ply consist of one board above another, and a con- 
cession of the additional height asked for would 
only mean that the unsightly collection of bizarre 
advertisements would be distributed over more ter- 
ritory. The restricting of the maximum height to 
six feet will have the effect of keeping out a large 
proportion of the unpicturesque "paper," and may 
eventually result in abolishing the offensive exhibi- 
tions of the advertiser's art altogether. 

3 <2* 

Many Angelenos experienced feelings akin to 
losing an old friend when they read of the de- 
struction by fire of the Tavern of Castle Crag. 
Nestled up among the rocks and pines and rip- 
pling streams of Mount Shasta it has been an ideal 
resort for the weary and luxuriously inclined for 
many years, a place of indescribable fascination 
and Paradisean comfort. It was but one of the 



acter cannot but conflict in time if the spirit of 
enmity of interests continues and it is to be sin- 
cerely hoped that ere long the breach may be 
mended. 

jl < < 

Comparatively few people gazing at the mag- 
nificently picturesque pillar of smoke that ascended 
from the Sierra Madre mountains back of Pasadena 
last Sunday were aware of the depressing signifi- 
cance of the spectacle to those whose energies have 
been enlisted in the preservation of our forests. 
The disaster wrought by mountain fires should be 
known by every person. That the protection of 
the water sheds of Southern California has much 
to do with the prosperity of this section is an 
obvious fact, and the importance of preventing 
such conflagrations as visited the Santa Anita can- 
yon is such that if necessary no one should be 
allowed to approach the government reserve. The 
criminally careless individual responsible for Sun- 
day's fire should be severely punished, for such an 
example appears to be absolutely necessary to in- 
spire others with a proper respect for the rights 
of the people at large. 



important cases. Coming to Los Angeles in the 
fall of 1889. he soon established a good practice 
here and in 1891 was appointed by Hon. James Mc- 
Lachlan chief deputy in the District Attorney's 
office in this county, where he was engaged in 
many important civil cases for the county and 
with exceptional success. He was appointed Judge 
of the Superior Court by Gov. Markham on the 
1st of January. 1894, and In the Republican con- 
vention in 189-1, he was nominated to succeed him- 
self on the first ballot with eight candidates in 
the field and two only to be nominated. The to- 
tal vote in the convention was 517V&, of which he 
received 283%. This was accomplished against a 
strong opposition of political combinations and 
with a majority of the delegates of his home town 
of Pasadena against him. In this convention 
Judge York absolutely refused to enter into any 
combination with any other candidate for any of- 
fice. At the election following .us vote was about 
3500 in excess of his opponent, a very popular and 
able lawyer, who had both the Democratic and 
Populist nominations. During his incumbency he 
has tried some of the most Important cases ever 
filed in Los Angeles county. These include the 
celebrated case of the Vineland Irrigation District 
vs. The Azusa Irrigating Company et als.. involv- 
ing a large quantity of the waters of the San Ga- 
briel river, and the trial of which lasted about 
two months. This case was appealed and Judge 
York's decision was sustained by the Supreme 
Court. 

Judge York is a man of earnest but courteous 
manners, of judicial temperament and an excellent 
legal knowledge. Referring to his care taken in 
the naturalization of foreigners the Evening Ex- 
press of April 25th, 1894. said: "Los Angeles de- 
serves to be congratulated on having a Judge who 
has the nerve, the patriotism and the manliness to 
call a halt on the lowering of the standard of 
American citizenship." 

The Pomona Times of August 1st, 1894, among 
other good things said of him. contained the fol- 
lowing fitting eulogy, "his dignity, ability and ju- 
dicial fairness have been commended on all hands. 
We have known him about 15 years betimes as 
citizen, lawyer and judge, and can truly say that 
a better man in either of these relations does not 
live anywhere. He is a Republican in principle. 
As a Judge he knows no party, but does know 
the law, interprets it accurately and enforces it 
wisely. The Pasadena News of June 13th last in 
declaring the neutrality of the editor of that paper 
on the judicial succession, pays this tribute, "We 
recognize in Judge York a capable, upright, splen- 
did judicial officer whose record is clean and note- 
worthy. In many respects he is the ideal Judge 
and for whom we have the highest regard." 

Judge York is now fifty-four years of age and 
in the prime of his mental and physical manhood. 



Wcstlakc Park 

Westlake Park, Sunday, July 29th, 2:30 p. m.: 



Grand march, "Suite op. 113" Lachner 

Waltz. "Wine, Woman & Song" Straus 

Selection, "II Trovatore" Verdi 

Entracte, "The Ballet Girl" Pendix 

Intermezzo, "Cupid's Pleadings" Voelker 

Overture, "Light Cavalry" Suppe 

Cornet solo. "The Commodore" Laurendeau 

By Y. Escobar. 

Potpourri. "Ye Olden Times" Beyer 

Selection, "Faust" Gounod 

Medley, "The Limit" Hackle 

"Star Spangled Banner" 



Hollenbeck Park 

I lollenbeck Park. Sunday evening, July 29th. 



7:30: 

March. "Ye Boston Tea Party" Pryor 

Waltzes, "Blue Danube" Straus 

Selection, "Orpheus" Offenbach 

"Spring Song" Mendelssohn 

Morceau, "Swiss Chimes" Hoffman 

Overture, "The Viking" Luscombe 

Songs, "Because." Til Leave My Happy Home".. 

Medley. "Broadway to Tokio" Sloanc 

Potpourri, "You Got to Play Ragtime, l'he 

GHrl 1 Left in Dixie" Mackie 

.March. "The Union Forever" Scouton 



Green and yellow Traction cars run direct to 
park. 

< < < 

Viola Allen will not lay aside her Titian tresses 
with the character of Glory Qtiayle which she has 
played for the past two seasons, when she assumes 
a new part next September. Hall Calne made his 
heroine say. in response to John Storm's reproof: 
"You might as well tell me that I ought not to have 
red hair; I can't help It." Therein was authorized 
the ultra auburn wig which Miss Allen wore so be- 
comingly in "The Christian." K. Marion Crawford, 
author of "In the Palace of the King," which Lori- 
mer Stoddard has turned into a play for Miss Allen, 
describes his heorlne, Dolores De Mandoza, as fol- 
lows: "She was very fair, as Spaniards sometimes 
are still and were more often in those days, — with 
golden hair and deep gray eyes."- wherein Miss Al- 
len finds sanction for retaining her Incarnadined 
locks. Time was when ruddy hair was considered 
a hoodoo on the stage, but Miss Allen's phenomenal 
success has changed all this, and the prospects of 
the red-haired heroine are orlght— in fact glowing. 




JUDGE WAI.ho M. V'OKK 



chain of fine resorts owned in California by the 
Pacific Improvement Company, which with its cus- 
tomary energy will no doubt begin at once the 
work of reconstruction. 

J* £ 

An unfortunate condition has presented itself 
in the business interests of Los Angeles in the es- 
tablishing of a second Board of Trade by dissatis- 
fied members of the original organization. The 
retailing of the dissensions that resulted in a split 
in the association would only intensify the feeling 
existing, and it is only just to say that the con- 
flict of opinion is born of sincere convictions on 
both sides. It is not the policy of good business 
men to get at loggerheads through spite or pique, 
and it is to be regretted that the points at issue 
were of sufficient moment and the division of opin- 
ion so strong that common ground could not be 
found by the contesting factions. The Board of 
Trade is essentially a co-operative association for 
mutual protection and benefit. In its workings the 
individual has often to sink his own advantage for 
the benefit of all, for on the morrow he will profit 
by the like action of another member. The disen- 
tangling of affairs between debtors and creditors 
has been resolved into a practical system through 
the years of experience of the organization. 

It is obvious that two associations of like char- 



For Superior Court Judge 

ON this page is presented a likeness of Judge 
Waldo M. York of the Superior Court. In- 
asmuch as his term of office will expire 
this year and he will be a candidate for re-election, 
it is an opportune time to present some informa- 
tion with regard to the career of this prominent 
jurist. Commencing as a farmer boy In Maine. 
Judge York in early life was a successful teacher 
and while still a young man was admitted to prac- 
tice in the Supreme Court of the State of Maine. 
He rose rapidly in his profession of the law and 
was elected Judge of the Probate Court at Seattle 
at the early age of 2f> years. There have been 
several comments published with regard to his 
career on the probate bench, including statements 
by two ex-Chief Justices of the Supreme Court, 
one ex-member of Congress and one ex-United 
States District Attorney, in which ho Is referred 
to as having been one of the best Probate Judges 
that that county ever had, although several ex- 
cellent men and sound lawyers had been among 
them. Judge York resigned his position on the 
Probate bench and entered into a law partnership 
with his wife's brother, John M. Whitworth, in 
San Francisco, where the firm soon acquired a 
large and lucrative practice and handled many 



4 



Western Graphic 



CARMENCITA 

By Wingrove Bathorv 



WE had a dim recollection of having heard she 
had been born in Panama, or Aspinwall. 
He knew she had been reared in New York, 
but she possessed an undoubted southern tempera- 
ment. He remembered whenever he had asked her 
did she love him. she had habitually replied, in 
Spanish: 

"Quien sabe?" 

So he commenced to think ot her and speak of 
her as "Carmencita.'' although he admitted her 
own name was much prettier than that. 

He was usually very sensible where women were 
concerned. New Orleans, who knew nothing of 
Carmencita and who noticed his neglected oppor- 
tunities, said he was making a fool of himself. But 
his brother and the man who played "Damon" 
to his "Pythias" (they always thought well of 
him), laid their heads together and concluded Car- 
mencita was doing it. 

She did begin it. Creole as he was, she had but 
to show him the path. He had a Southern tem- 
perament of his own. 

"Billie," as she afterward learned to call him, 
went one night to his Damon's house, where Car- 
mencita had arrived on a visit to Damon's family. 
His coming interrupted a conversation on the sub- 
ject of kissing, and he was introduced to her. His 
brother was there. He afterward learned that he 
and Damon, in the callous way current among men 
who are intimate friends, had been expatiating to 
Carmencita upon the fault of bashfulness that 
hung like a millstone around his neck. 

Carmencita had remarked just prior to his ar- 
rival, that she thought very little of a man who 
would wantonly refuse a kiss offered him by a 
woman — the conversation having reached that 
stage. 

She turned to "Billie," when the introduction 
was over, and looked him in the eyes. She told 
him she put no faith in the shyness he was said 
to have. And she asked him what he would do 
if she offered him a kiss. 

She was a remarkably beautiful girl. Even his 
brother and Damon admitted that. 

"At this minute?" he inquired. 

"Yes." she replied, over her shoulder, provoca- 
tion in her voice. 

Seating herself at the piano, she played the 
opening bars of a song. 

Seeing the silent laughter in the eyes of his 
brother and Damon, he exchanged a wink with 
Good Fortune, as he noticed the low burning lights 
in the chandelier overhead. 

"Well," he commenced to reply, as he drew far- 
ther back into the shadow, "at this particular mo- 
ment. Ah should endeavuh toe evade thuh oppoh- 
tunity. Foh youah sake, believe me! Ah hev just 
come from a long walk, an' Ah'm sorry toe say 
Ah've been smokin' a pipe." 

He drawled out the words in the customary 
Creole speech, but, soft as the accents were, he and 
his brother and Damon knew that they must have 
hurt, as they saw her start of surprise. 

Her laughter was rather constrained. She did 
not reply, and continued to play the song. 

But three hours later she had occasion to come 
into the room where he and his brother and Da- 



mon were playing a game of cards. It fell to his 
lot to hand her a glass of wine. She met him 
in the center of the room, as he came forward, the 
wine in one hand, his cards in the other. She 
placed her arms around his neck and kissed him 
on the lips. 

It was very mockingly done. A flush came over 
his cheek at the laughter and chaff that assailed 
him from the card-table. It was not that that 
urged him on. Carmencita herself had cast the 
die when she kissed him. 

He tossed the cards over his shoulder, and held 
her with his disengaged hand. He passed his arm 
around her neck, as she started to draw away. 

"Ah'll give yo thet kiss back," he said, tran- 
quilly. And he did. 

"Thuh next time," he said, as he handed her the 
wine, with a bow. "yo' shall hev nothin' toe com- 
plain of. Ah shall stop smokin'." 

"I do not think there will be a next time," she 
said, with a glance at his flashing eyes. 

"I am rather afraid of you. now," she added, as 
she started to leave the room. 

She had gone to her room above, but his interest 



"Good God!" they said, when the waiter return- 
ed, and they saw he was in earnest. "What ah 
yo' goin' toe do?" 

"Drink 'em," he said. 

"Do yo' know what they'll do toe yo,' if yo' do?" 
they asked, curiously. 

"Quien Sabe?" he said with a yawn, commencing 
with the first. 

When they, took him home and put him to bed, 
th r y locked the doors and windows and laid their 
he:ids together again. 

"Don't yo' think we had bettuh try an' get huh 
back heah?" Damon asked. 

"No." said his brother. "Let him hev fouh oh 
five yeahs to get ovuh it. It will be easiuh foh 
him." 

Four of the years eventually went by. When 
four months of the first elapsed Carmencita wrote 
him she was to be married; but. writing from Old 
Point Comfort the day after her marriage she sent 
him a message containing her kind regards. 

He spoke of it to his brother and Damon as an 
evidence of how much she thought of him; boast- 
fuly he said it, with a smile of full content. 

When two of the years had passed he awakened 
one day to find that the thought of Carmencita 
was neither a pleasure nor pain. 

He spent the next two years, not at his office, 
at work at his profession, but in writing to Car- 
mencita and trying to read between the lines of 
her replies. One phrase, in which she told him. 




The girl who sings incessantly either has a 
sweet disposition or a grudge against her neigh- 
bors. 



AND KISSED HIM ON THK UPS 



Horace S. Cutter 



Edward D. Silent 



! 

§ Ed. D. Silent & Co. I 

jjj established in 18S5 * 

x l, MRMHKR8 v |, 

£ LOS ANGELES OIL EXCHANGE $ 

CALIFORNIA OIL EXCHANGE 

* $ 

»!/ BUY AND UU « 

t Oil Stocks Strictly on Commission t 

f t 

* OFFICE * 

m 216 West Second street Tel Main 695 $ 

4* ib lb il/ 1 1/ ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib ib lb lb ib lb lb lb \b ib lb lb V- 
-J 

! Kern River Oil 

and Development Co. 



301 Laughlin Bldg. 212 Sansome St. 

Los Angeles San Francisco 

Own outright 320 acres in Kern District. 

Lease outright on 100 acres in Fullerton Dis- 
trict, near big producing wells. 

250,000 shares, $1.00 each 100,000 shares in 
treasury. Non-assessable. 

20 Cent* a Shnre 



^ «»i <»i m m /»i <»i m m (|i »»i hi »ii m <»i <»i m <»i <»i m if 1 /»i m mm m /f 1 m m »(i <»i hi <ti <t 



in the cards he was playing was not so great that 
he did not hear her light step on the stairs, as she 
returned. She came back, she called, as she passed 
the open doorway, to find a handkerchief she had 
left in the darkened parlor beyond. 

"Ah'll find it foh yo'," he said, as he followed 
her into the room. 

He did; and he found her lips on his and her 
arms around his neck, once more, just as he had 
expected. But to his brother and Damon he re- 
cited nothing of that. 

That was the way Carmencita began to make a 
fool of him. 

After that, she insisted upon seeing him once 
every 24 hours. She talked to him over the tele- 
phone every morning at his office. She sometimes 
wrote to him three times a day, frequently twice, 
always once. 

While in his arms one night she had repeated 
to him the old love verses beginning: 
Ycu kissed me! My heart and my breath and my 
will 

In delirious joy for a moment stood still! 

Earth held for me then no temptations, no charms 

No visions of happiness outside of your arms! 

"Do yo' love me?" he had asked her, after a 
silence. 

"Quien sabe?" she had replied. 

In that way she continued, during the remaining 
three weeks of her visit to New Orleans, the meta- 
morphosis his brother and Damon discovered when 
they laid their heads together. 

After that she said she must return to her home 
in New York. 

The night of her departure his brother and Da- 
mon took him for a walk. He led them to a cafe, 
and ordered six absinthe frappe. 



"If you understood all the network of my life, you 
would pity rather than reproach me," haunted him 
like a ghost. It was a ghost, the ghost of her un- 
happ.ness; and it went to bed with him at night 
and got up with him in the morning. 

He wrote her comforting letters, telling her how 
dearly he valued her friendship. She remained to 
him, stiil, he told her, the fire in every star. He 
begged her to believe if the time ever came when 
she needed some one who could be everything in 
the world and absolutely nothing to her he would 
be that one, for want of a better. Her unhappi- 
ness haunted him so that from being neither a 
pleasure nor pain to him, at the end of four years 
she had become both. 

At the end of the four years, when she arrived 
in New Orleans on another visit to Damon's fam- 
ily, he went to see her as soon as she wrote him 
to come. 

He read in her eyes the pain that her loveless 
life was causing her, and he carefully hid his joy 
at the news of her husband's health. She was 
afraid he was dying; he was afraid he would not. 

He came to see her again and again. He made a 
remark one night that she could safely trust his 
self-control. 

The day before the one set for her departure, 
she sent him a note to come and bid her good- 
bye. He need not exercise too much self-control, 
she told him: she wanted to see him again, the 
"Billie" she had known in days gone by. 

Despite her permission, he held himself well in 
hand; so well, that in the hallway, as he was leav- 
ing for his home, when she threw her arms around 
his neck and kissed him in the fond old way, he 
told her that it hurt him more than a stinging 
blow in the face. 



Western Graphic 




Under the Derricks 



"Ah am a diffuhent soht of a man than yo' 
think," his eyes were saying. 

"I think I understand you." her eyes replied, 
as she said, "You misunderstood me,'" with her 
lips and the flush on her face. 

"No. Ah didn' misunduhstan' yo'." he said. 
"Yo' should not hev kissed me. Ah'm flesh an' 
blood, not stone. Yo' know thet. of old." 

"I see no harm in it," she said. "Why, do you 
suppose, did I do it?" 

"Foh thuh same reason thet yo' kissed me thuh 
fuhst time, Ah dahsay!" 

"And that was?" 

"Ah really don' know," his lips replied, as his 
eyes blazed out "For coquetry's sake!" 

"I'll tell you why I did it," she said, quietlv. 
"For friendship's sake. It was simply a friendly 
kiss good-bye." 

"A friendly kiss!" he echoed, as his lips were 
saying, "That kiss?" 

"Yes. A friendly kiss. It was that, was it not?" 

"Quien sabe?" his eyes were saying, as he 
laughed between his teeth. 

He abruptly told her good-bye, as he passed 
through the open-door. 

"Of all thuh fools Ah evuh heahed of." Damon 
said, when he told him, "yo' ah suhtainly thuh 
wohst! Thuh idea of lettin' youahse'f be played 
with by a woman who does things like thet!" 

"An' in spite of it all," he continued, "Ah dahsay 
when huh husban' does die ; yo' will step in at 
thuh crookin' of huh finguh end!" 

"Quien sabe?" he noncommittally replied. 
(Copyrighted, 1900, Wm. R. Miller.) 



*"TMIK organization of a strong combination of 
1 the Kern river field will have a very good 
oil men to take care of the production of 
effect upon the oil market when the railroad now 
building to that field has been completed and the 
work of moving the accumulated oil has begun. 
But its greatest good to oil men will arise in the 
organization of a strong combination with ample 
capital to handle this oil. By so doing it will be 
possible to make contracts to furnish large quan- 
tities of oil on long contracts, thus enabling largo 
manufacturers to contract for their needs for years 
to come. The volume of oil now above ground 
and in prospect is sufficient to make such con- 
tracts safe, and it is only necessary to consolidate 
capital in sufficient amount to purchase and hold 



the oil to accomplish what has been the dream of 
oil men for years a steady market for oil. II is 
well that this movement has come in the shape of 
the co-operation of the producers rather than by 
men whose only interest is in holding and .ship- 
ping oil. Such combinations are apt to disinte- 
grate into monopolies, but if the producers can 
unite so as to furnish the necessary capital among 
themselves their interests will be taken care of. 
Jt * .< 

From a consumer's point of view also this move- 
ment is a good one. He will know that an ample 
and continuous supply will be accumulated and 
maintained, and the producers will not run the 
price up beyond the point where its consumption 
will be checked. Of course it is not to be sup- 
posed that the organization now being perfected at 
Bakersfleld will control all the oil produced, but 
the fact that the producers are taking care of so 
large a portion of the oil will have a tonic effect 
upon the market. 

.< ,* „* 

The effort now being made in some portions of 
the East to break the monopoly which the Alca- 
traz Asphaltum Company now have in the market 
for asphaltum is being watched with much in- 
terest by owners of the California product. In 
Pittsburg lately the City Council awarded a con- 
tract for asphaltum to the trust at three cents per 
pound above a bid for California asphaltum, on 
the alleged ground that the Trinidad product was 
the beter article. A taxpayer has begun injunc- 
tion proceedings to compel the acceptance of the 
lowest bid, and it is expected that the facts which 
will be brought out in the trial will prove that 
California asphaltum is equal to the best Trinidad 
product. California asphaltum has had a hard 
fight for recognition, and even in coast cities it has 
been discriminated against. Its purity and wear- 
ing qualities are now acknowledged by all un- 
prejudiced engineers, but the combination which 
has succeeded in absorbing the largest local com- 
pany has heretofore been strong enough to monop- 
olize the trade even in the home market. It is 
therefore to be hoped that the coming trial will 
educate the people throughout the country in ref- 
erence to the quality of California asphaltum. 

But few people, even in California, are aware 
of the fact that the deposits of asphaltum in Cali- 
fornia are the most extensive in the world. But 
such is the fact. In Ventura, Santa Barbara, San 
Luis Obispo and other counties the beds are sim- 
ply inexhaustible. The seashore for over a hun- 
dred miles is lined with these deposits, much of it 
in a pure state, and in localities they extend in- 
land for many miles. The State can supply the 
world with this useful paving material for many 
years, however rapid may be the increase in the 
demand. Fortunately most of these beds are yet 
out of the hands of the trust, and it is to be hoped 
that a free market may soon be obtained. 

< 4 < 

The reported disagreement about boundary lines 
of oil property in the FullertOn district, while of 
little moment as between the companies immedi- 
ately interested, points to a danger which threat- 
ens, in a more or less degree, many titles of oil 
property in California. The bulk of property is on 
land which has heretofore been nearly worthless 
until oil was discovered and consequently but little 
attention has been paid to the proper surveys and 
the establishment of monuments marking the 
lines, but now that the land which a few mouths 
ago had but little value has become very valuable, 
a variation of a few feet in the lines bounding 
the limits of property means in some instances the 
loss or gain of a fortune, and this will be a fruit- 
ful source of litgation in future If proper surveys 
are not made and boundaries carefully established. 
No company should venture to make improvements 
on oil territory until this is done. This applies 
not only to property which has been surveyed by 
the United States government, but has additional 
force in cases where the land is located near the 
boundaries of Spanish grants, for it is well known 
that the borders of these grants have been ex- 
tended beyond the original limits and unless they 
have been in possession of the owners for the 
statutory limit which gives them a possessory 
title, the possibilities of litigation in such cases 
are unlimited. 

<t x < 

Another matter in regard to titles which should 
not be overlooked is to see that an abstract of 
title Is Obtained and the lease promptly recorded. 
There is altogether too much carelessness in this 



MARINE OIL COMPANY 



S. W. KNAPP, 

President and Gen. Mgr. 



OF SUMMERLAND 

Capital $300,000.00 
140,000 In Treasury 



H. D. LOMBARD 

Secretary and Trtas. 



Offers subject to previous sale 10,000 shares at 35 cents per share on which price we 
are earning large returns. 25,000 shares sold between May 17th 
and May 30th. After the present issue of 10,000 shares has been 
taken the price will be advanced. 

We Own 32 Producing Wells and Territory for 60 More 

We are not hunting for oil, but we have oil in sufficient quantities 
to earn large returns on the present selling price of stock 



Call or send 
for Prospectus 



Marine Oil Company... 



432 Bvrne Building 
Los Angeles 



— -a? •^■^■<S7 ■^•^■^■^ -^7 -^r 



m 



F. H. Dunham, Pres. Franklin Refining Co., President 

F. L. Hossack, Secretary. 

Hercules Oil Producing Company 

Are now drilling on their Kern River lands; also drilling in the I.os 
ADgeles field. The Company has valuable oil lands in Coalinga, Kern 
River, Ventura, Newhall and Los Angeles fields 

REFINERY 

The Company has begun work on the largest oil refinery on the coast. 
The earning power of this plant will be equal to the value of the produc- 
tion from several oil wells of 100 barrels capacity each""per day. This 
insures good dividends. 'Hercules" stock is worth owning and is worth 
holding as a permanent investment. It will Increase rapidly in value. 

Rooms 230-231 Douglas Building, Los Angeles, Cal 




Imperial State Mining: and Milling- Co.'s 10-Stamp Mill 



fln Absolutely 
Sate Investment 



ft Mine, not a Prospect 

The property consists of the Lost 
Horse, Lost Horse Extension, and 
People's Party Claims, each claim 
being 600 by 1500 feet in area, situated 
in Riverside County, Cal. 

The books of the mine show that 
about 3000 tons have been mined, and 
milled, with an average result of $27 
per ton. 

Shares now 25 Gents 



OFFICERS 

B. Frank Hand President 

S. M. KELSEY Vice-President 

O. S. WiLUAMS Secretary 

C. H. Schirmer Treasurer 

U. S. O. Tor.D Gf-neral Manager 

S. M. KELSEY Superintendent 

B. Frank Hand . .Consulting F.ngineer 



Imperial State Mining and Milling Go. 

Capital $1,000,000 -fully paid— non-assessable 



605 Laughlin Bnildinrj 



Los ftnrjeles 



Western Graphic 



Absolute 
Guarantee 
Against Loss 

THE ORGANIZERS 
OF THE 

OPHIR 

OIL COMPANY 



Have arranged with the California 
Safe Deposit and Trust Company of 
San Francisco, to hold sufficient secur- 
ities in trust for the purchasers of 
Ophir Oil stock to 

Insure Holders of this Stock 
Against Loss . . i . 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Com- 
pany shall fail to produce oil in pav- 
ing quantities sufficient to bring- its 
stock to par value ( one dollar per 
share), purchasers will receive back, 
with accrued interest, the entire 
amount paid in by them for stock. 

The securities thus held in trust are 
adequate, and an investment in Ophir 
Oil Stock is as secure as a United 
States Government Bond, and vastly 
superior to deposits in Banks of Sav- 
ings, for the reason that it combines 

Absolute Security 
with Immense 
Possibilities 
of Gain 

when oil is struck. There is no "read- 
ing- between the lines" in this propo- 
sition. Whatever happens to the 
Ophir Oil Company your investment 
is safe. You cannot lose. Only a 
limited amount of this Secured Stock 
is offered for sale. Its propertv con- 
sists of 800 acres in Coalinga District, 
Fresno county, being all of section 23 
and % of section 14, township 21 south, 
range 15 east, M. D. M. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

WARREN G1LLELEN 

President Broadway Bank, Los Angeles 

JOHN W. A. OFF 

Cashier State Bank and Trust Co., Los 
Angeles 

JOHN MASON GARDINER 

Engineer and General Contractor of Pub- 
lic Works, Phoenix, A. T., and I.os Angeles 

JOHN MARTIN 

President Martin Pipe and Foundry Co. 
Mgr. Stanley Electric Co., San Francisco 

GEORGE KENT HOOPER 

Manager Occidental Hotel, San Francisco 

NATHANIEL J. M ANSON 

Attorney-at-Law, San Francisco 

H. R. HURLBUT 

Fifteen years in charge of Advertising 
Department, San Francisco Call 



Ophir Oil Co. 

Los Angeles Office 

402 Douglas Bldg. 

San Francisco Office, 

Room 14, Fifth floor, Mills Building- 



regard. In the mad rush for oil land many people 
forget that the title to land rests upon defined 
rules and the equities of chancery courts cannot be 
invoked where there are laches in transferring 
titles. As much care should be exercised in per- 
fecting the title of leased land as where the prop- 
erty is purchased in fee simple. 

J» ..< jH 

During the past week the two exchanges have 
been backing and filling in reference to consolida- 
tion. A large majority of both organizations ap- 
pear to be in favor of consolidation, but some 
men who are considered big fish in the exchange 
to which they belong fear that in the united body 
their Individuality would be overshadowed, and 
they are doing some vigorous "kicking" about the 
unwisdom of surrender. Many meetings have 
been held and at the time this was written the 
governing board and members of the Los Angeles 
exchange had voted in favor of the amalgamation 
and the matter was being considered by the Cali- 
fornia exchange, where it seems to be hanging. 

One reason for the favorable consideration of the 



day and straightway got up a little scheme whereby 
they would watch when a particular stock went low 
on one exchange they would buy and skip over to 
its rival and sell at a few points above, thus turn- 
ing a nimble sixpence on the "sure thing" prin- 
ciple. The frequent trips from one body to the 
other soon exposed the game, but quite a number 
cleaned up enough to pay a week's board at the 
seashore before it was found out. 

Many oil men complain that business is dull. 
Comparatively this is true, but it should be remem- 
bered that more California people go to the sea- 
shore in the summer than any other section of 
God's footstool. Why this is so is a mystery, for 
our summer climate is the most enjoyable to be 
found anywhere, but the fact cannot be gainsaid. 
They have gotten so much in the habit of living 
in tents or packing themselves like sardines in 
resort hotels that when the calendar shows that it 
is July or August they would feel like the pro- 
verbial fish out of water if they did not rush from 
home for a few weeks' discomfort where the "sad 
sea waves" moan or the smoke from a mountain 



Men Who Have Made the Oil Industry 



3-M. W. TURNER 




Photo by Schumacher 



AAK. MANLEY W. TURNER represents the solid, conservative element of the opera- 
tors in the Southern California oil fields. Coming to Los Angeles in the spring of 
1H94 from Boston, where he was at the head of a large electric light and power company, 
he became interested in the primitive search for oil in the local field. Becoming con- 
vinced that the situation warranted the expenditure of considerable capital, he, in con- 
nection with his brother, at once became actively engaged in oil development. The 
Turner brothers built the first Standard rig and erected the first pumping plant. One 
year ago Mr. M. W. Turner organized the Turner Oil Company, securing very choice 
oil lands at Whittier and has since developed its holdings to a production of over 200 
barrels per day. Its stock is rated one of the best and safest on the market, having 
steadily risen from par, $1.00, to $1.25 on the Los Angeles Oil Exchange. It has paid 
seven monthly dividends, averaging over 15 per cent, per annum, and is held as a 
choice investment. 



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consolidation plan is that the business transacted 
by the two exchanges is not enough to give a de- 
cent living for one-quarter of the members. Take 
the total transactions of the most active days and 
a computation of the commissions received on the 
business, fend it will be found that it would not 
give a decent salary to over fifty members. This 
has been ithe reason why so many brokers have 
departed from the custom of confining themselves 
to the placing of orders received from customers, 
and becoming gamblers in stocks. It is true that 
the volume of sales has increased since the Cali- 
fornia exchange began business, but the number of 
brokers has increased more rapidly. 

tt?^ 

Some curbstone operators played a mean trick 
upon the two exchanges the other day. In the 
game of battledore and shuttle-cock which the 
members play with stocks the two bodies often 
get wide apart in quotations in the price of stocks. 
The curbstone contingent observed this the other 



fire does not fill their eyes with smoke or cin- 
ders. But the oil business is not more seriously 
affected than any other. From this on until well 
into September the same conditions will prevail, 
by which time the crowds will return, avowing 
that they have had a lovely time, although their 
cuticles are abraded by sundry blisters and scars 
which make them resemble tatooed Indians. 
Jl ,•* 

Another jolt the brokers have received has been 
the demand of the Tinted States for the payment 
of $50 license. This tax will have to be paid, for 
the entire year, in a few days, and those who have 
been going through a dry and dull summer on their 
pickings from the sale of stocks are "up against" 
the fact that said fifty dollars would make a pretty 
big hole in their depleted bank account — if they 
have one. But Uncle Sam is inexorable, and 
brokers must pay up or step out — for Johnny Wray 
is a regular sleuth in hunting up people who forget 
to pay their revenue taxes. 



Western Graphic 



7 



Where Cool Breezes Blow 

News and Gossip from the R^esorts 



SANTA MONICA— There is no resort that 
has the natural attractions and the artifi- 
cial advantages of Santa Monica. Take 
the long stretch of beach, the magnificent sweep 
of the sea, the picturesqueness of the nestling vil- 
lage, and all the diversions that are to be derived 
from bathing, yachting, boating, golfing, tennis, 
etc., natural where land and water combine to 
afford entertainment for pleasure seekers, and you 
have the ideal resort Santa Monica is. Then there 
is its accessibility to town, its fine car and train 
service, and a long established and fully equipped 
hotel. 

After resorters have made the rounds of the va- 
rious seacoast attractions, they invariably seek 
the sands at Santa Monica. It is the only real 
"beach." Where else can you find the same pano- 
rama of bathers and spectators; the gay crowd 
that traverses the ocean's edge or camps under 
brightly hued umbrellas? 

The tropical snap of the past week has brought a 
daily importation of arrivals, and the town has 
taken on a summer appearance. It is a matter of 
fact that the fad of pitching one's house quite 
down on the sands has taken the fancy of a great 
host of the usual summer fraternity that hereto- 
fore made its abode in the picturesque cottages 
along the bluff. The fashionable element of other 
years that "took a house" at a hundred a month 
now take a shanty along the board walk for much 
the same rental. It is merely a matter of taste — 
leaving the owners of the erstwhile paying estab- 
lishments looking rather blank. 

The situation is, therefore, either a tiny box on 
the beach or the Hotel Arcadia, with the result 
that all the gaities of the town center about the 
doors of this ever popular hostelry, the managers 
having extended all the courtesies to its neigh- 
bors and friends equal with the strangers within 
its gates. 

Every day has its special bulletin of entertain- 
ment, bowling, golfing, canyon drives, dances and 
what not, all pioneered by the master of cere- 
monies, Mr. Willis Ames, of Salt Lake, who takes 
all the responsibilities of arranging the pleasure 
"exertions" with unfailing success. Last Saturday 
night there was a very swell ball, the first formal 
dance of the season, which drew together all the 
fashionable element of the old residenters of 
Santa Monica, a special delegation of the young 
society set of Los Angeles, and the full force of 
the hotel guests, making quite a gay assemblage. 
The Klaus orchestra furnished the music. On 
Wednesday evening there was a childrens' danc- 
ing party which was a very pretty affair and en- 
joyed quite as much by the throng of spectators 
as by the "party" on the floor. Virginia reels, 
two-steps and cake walks aoounded. Little Master 
Barucb delighted everybody with his ready acqui- 
escence to cake walk before the audience, and the 
two wee tots, the children of Mr. and Mrs. E. 0. 
McLaughlin, of Los Angeles, brought down the 
house with a prompt imitation of Master Baruch's 
"walk." Little Master Edward, aged perhaps 4, 
gallantly led his small sister, Miss Cecile, barely 
able to walk, but coquettishly lifting her skirt, 
through those rag-time steps that have made 
Cllllud gemlemen and ladies famous. 

There is no establishment on the beach that has 
met with the popularity of the Arcadia Grill Room 
these summer days. Detachments in singles and 
doubles, and whole batallions "take in" the good 
things and the view. Last Sunday was a red- 
letter day, the largest of the Grill's experience. 
Seats were at a premium and the chef hardly knew 
where he was at. Among the many prominent 
Angelefio patrons were seen Judge and Mrs. H. 
C. Gooding and Miss Gertrude Gooding, the genial 
judge having now almost entirely recovered from 
his recent accident. 

On Wednesday there was a special luncheon at 
the Grill. Mrs. 0. A. Brandt, of Los Angeles, en- 
tertained a fashionable party in honor of two 
ladies from Texas, who are visiting Mrs. William 
Bradley, of Boyle Heights — Mrs. J. Q. Myers, of 
Dallas, and Miss Kittibel Peeler, of Bonham. A 
portion of the Grill had been reserved for the oc- 
casion and screened off from the main room. A 
very fine fish menu was served and was immensely 
enjoyed. The view without and within was "un- 
surpassed," and the affair was voted a perfect suc- 
cess. The other guests included Mrs. Judge Chap- 
man, Mrs. W. G. Worsham, Mrs. J. W. Hendrick, 
Mrs. W. Maguire, Mrs. Charley Handy, Mrs. A. B. 
McCutchen, Mrs. Ward Chapman, Miss Anna and 
Miss Mary Chapman, Miss Mayme Hendrick, and 
Miss Helen Brandt. 

One of the advantages of hotel life at Santa 
Monica is being able to entertain one's friends 
without care or responsibility, and the Arcadia's 
guests make golden uses of the opportunity. On 
Wednesday evening among the special guests were 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Jones, who were entertained by 
Col. and Mrs. 0. F. Long, of San Francisco, and 
who remained to participate in the impromptu 
dance following the childrens' party. 

It is getting to be quite the thing to have bowl- 
ing parties at the North Beach alleys. Tuesday 



evening a jolly Crowd went down from the Ar- 
cadia. Those participating were Mr. and Mrs. H. 
\V. Vail, Mr. J. V. and Miss Vickers, Judge C. N. 
Buckler, Miss Margaret Buckler. A. W. Sinclair, 
Margaret Sinclair, Miss Louise Harris, Col. and 
Mrs. O. F. Long. Mrs. Simon Heineman. Mr. M. 
Howard Jones, Mr. C. W. Ames, Mr. E. O. Mc- 
Laughlin. Mr. Ames and Miss Harris carried off 
honors Witn a score of 206, and Mr. Jones and Miss 
Buckler were second with a score of 201. 

Evening plunge parties are very much the 
proper thing, and these warm evenings everybody 
seems to gravitate naturally towards the water. 

The new club house is about completed, and 
there is talk of opening it with a subscription 
dance, to take place the first week in August. 

Preparations are already under way for the com- 
ing championship tennis tournament, which will 
begin at the Casino courts on August 13th. The 
broad, shady verandas of the club house will give 
an opportunity lor the social side of tennis which 
has never been possible before. Every afternoon 
tea will be served to players and spectators, and 
some well-known society woman will have charge 
of each tea. On Saturday preceding tennis week 
there will be a golf tournament, and Mrs. Beatty 
and the Misses Beatty will give a tea in the after- 
noon at the club house. By the way, the new 
building, together with the links and the courts, 
will be called the Santa Monica Country Club. 

Friday evening, August 17th, the tournament 
ball will come off. Each year a feature of tennis 
week is the nance which winds it up. This time 
the Southern California Tennis Association can 
give the ball in its own quarters on a floor that is 
said to be unexcelled. All the devotees of tennis 
who remember the contests of several years ago, 
when the Carter family held most of the cham- 
pionships, will be glad to know that Miss Carter 
and at least two of her brothers will be here to 
take part again this summer. 

Santa Monica boasts a flourishing Camera Club, 
which took its initial outing one day last week. 
There are some lovely places in Rustic canyon, 
and Sam Carson's old hermitage was the objective 
point of the run. The party, consisting of fifteen, 
went out in a bus and had a very jolly time, in 
addition to securing a number of excellent views. 
Photography seems to be an. amusement which 
has hitherto been somewhat neglected at the beach 
resorts. 1 ne club has comfortable quarters and a 
good dark room at the North Beach Bath House. 

Mrs. G. L. Waring has invitations for an at home 
on Friday evening. 

Mrs. A. C. Hamilton, of San Francisco, is visit- 
ing at Miramar. Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Goodwin 
and baby will arrive in a few days for a visit at 
Miramar. 

Santa Monica seems to be the Mecca for people 
from Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. This year 
more than ever before large numbers of them have 
taken cottages, and they form a most agreeable 
factor in the social life of the place. 

,< j* & 

RFDONDO BEACH.— Merry Redondo has 
been having a full measure of good times 
this week. There have been an unusual 
number of entertainments, both small and of a 
more pretentious nature, and a large number of 
new names appear on the hotel register. The hop 
at the hotel Saturday night, although very informal 
was one of the best attended of the regular dances. 
Monday night the guests of the hotel and some of 
the cottagers formed a plunge party; the plunge 
was prepared especially for the occasion and the 
affair proved such an enjoyable one that hence- 
forth one evening of each week will be set aside 
for this diversion. Wednesday morning and after- 
noon was a big notcher for .fun. The tennis courts 
were taken possession by the "duffers," a score 
or more of players who had never handled a racket 
and those who were termed "has-beens." The men 
weie handicapped by being obliged to wear skirts, 
and during the mixed doubles the courts presented 
a scene of feminine grace and agility. The an- 
nouncement of the tournament brought out a good 
crowd of spectators, whose peals of laughter could 
be heard far beyond the pales of the tennis en- 
closure. Through the courtesy of Mr. H. B. Ains- 
worth the guests had a genuine watermelon treat 
at the finish of the games Miss Clara Carpenter 
•von the laurels for the ladies' singles. Miss Hazel 
llallett and Mr. Herbert Anderson were victorious 
In the mixed doubles. Mr. Guy Corson was the 
champion of the gentlemen's singles. The other 
players were Mrs. W. G. Young, Louise McFarland, 
RSllza Bon Ball, the Misses Nellie and Inez (Hark, 
Susie Carpenter, May Corson, Grace McCormick, 
Messrs. Earl Pursell, Herbert Anderson, Ivan An- 
derson, H. B. Ainsworth. W. R. Morris, Guy Cor- 
son, A. Peters, Clarence Carpenter. Wm. Nevin, 
James Hobbs, Mitchell, A. C. Denman. 

Mrs. H. B. Ainsworth was the hostess Wednes- 
day for a beautiful luncheon at her home. A 
wealth of flowers were used in the decorations, 
which consisted of white carnations and ferns. 
These were used on the table, the effect being en- 

Continuftl on fuge 1$ 



SANTA MONICA RESORTS 

Hotel Hrcadia 

Santa JYIomca 
by the sea 

finest Summer Resort on the pacific 

Elegant Hotel Elevator 
Electric Lights Orchestra 

SERVICE, TABLE, AND APPOINTMENTS 
UNEXCELLED 

Delightful, cool breezes from the ocean on 

warmest days. 
An ideal Summer Resort for those who wish 

to escape the heat of interior towns. 
The cleanest, smoothest and safest beach in the 
world. 

Surf bathing, boating, fishing, beautiful drives. 
Reached by S. P. R. R. trains and electric cars 
every half hour. Time from Los Angeles 
55 minutes. 
For rates and further information address 

W. E. ZANDER, Mgr. 

Ocean parkr^ F 

Domes By the Sea 8o " tb of „ . 

' Santa J^lomca 

Ocean front, KIcKant bench. Water piped to tract, Electric llgh 
connection. Long lease, $10.00 to 3 5 00 yearly rental The 
best opportunity ever offered to secure a home on the beach 

Ocean Hir ^ Ocean Beach 
Ocean Bathing 

Call on or address 

T. H. DUDLEY 



Corner Hill and Hetieh Streets 
Ocean Park 



Santa 



Monica <S 



will be more attractive this summer than 
before. There are No Saloons a New Club 
House for golf and tennis, a salt water 
Plunge filled dally and kept warm and 

many other things which ought to make it 
the best summer resort this coming season. 
Address a letter to the North Beach Bath 
House Co. and we shall be glad to furnish 
you with all sorts of information about hotel 
rates, cottages, bathing, athletics or any- 
thing else you many desire to know. L e t 
us help you locate this year. 



DAVIS M. CLARK 

REAL ESTATE, RENTAL AGENT 
I have a fine list of Cottages and Building Lois for sale 
or rent. The finest Beach on the Coast. 

1103 S. Second St., Oceanpark, 
At terminus of electric car lln L. A. C«., Cal. 



V. W. SMITH, l'rcsldent 



H. O. HA INKS, Treasurer 



F. C. MELTON, Secretary 

5i??|\leu; (?eQtury Oil <?o. 

lias h total of 38f>:t acres of the choicest Oil Lands, situated 
in the very heart of the known and proven best producing 
districts. This Company will also manufacture, under 0. 8. 
patent 439,745, 

Gasoline, Kerosene, Sewing Machine Oil, 
Bicycle 011, Engine Oil, Cylinder 011 
and Asphaltum 

Samples of all these can be seen at the Company's office. 
Subscriptions for stock will be received from 10 a.m. to S p m 
SHARES 461. OO ErtCH 



323 Acres in Soqucl Canyon 



Low Capitalization 
No Debts 



No Salaries 
No Assessments 



NEW CENTURY OIL COMPANY 

Telephone OKBBN 564 108-1 09-1 10 StlmSOn Blk. 

lb lb til lb >b lb lb lb j|i lb lb ili lb lb lb lb lb ib tb ib ib ib ib uV UV lb tb ib tb lb lb tb ff 

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We reserve the right to advance without 
notice. We invite you to investigate our 
proposition and personnel from top to 
bottom. 

LIBERTY OIL CO. 

Rooms 201-220, 202'^ S. Broadway 



fff\ f * i\ f\ f * ft f\ f* n f * f * ft ft n ft ff \ ft ft 11 ft f * f » f * f * v i» ft f *?» ft ft ft f- 



8 



Western Graphic 




A remarkable photograph. This picture was taken looking up a Bteep canyon, and shows a "hog hack" in 
the center which the fire has just passed over. Attention is called to the vast clouds of smoke and the flames 
consuming the lirush and trees, the line of flame extending across the entire canyon. Two minutes after this 
photo was taken the fire had reached and passed the artist's position. 



J5he 

A D 



M O 



i s a s 



U 

t e 



n 



t 

t 



r HE fire, which for the past week has been 
I raging in the mountains back of Pasadena, 
is, in many respects, the worst that has 
occurred for a number of years. Thousands of 
acres of water-shed have been denuded of brush 
and trees, in some places not a vestige being left 
of the once prolific growth. The burned area is 
in what is known as the San Gabriel reserve, 
which has been set apart by the government as a 
water-shed. The reserve begins at the Cajon Pass 
and extends fifty-four miles to Newhall, and 
reaches from the valley on this side to the desert, 
a distance of thirty miles. This enormous terri- 
tory is under the direct charge of W. A. Border, 
Superintendent for the United States, and under 
him are fourteen rangers, whose duty it is to pre- 
vent forest fires. It is fallacy to believe that four- 
teen men could properly patrol 555,000 acres of 
rugged mountain country, which is poorly supplied 
with trails, or that they could successfully con- 
tend with the fire fiend, once it had a little start. 
Germany expends annually ten times as much in 
patrolling its forests as the United States, and 
the value of its forests are as nothing when com- 
pared with our boundless resources. One hundred 
men would have sufficient work in this one reser- 
vation alone, to properly patrol it, and keep watch 
over the campers and prospectors, to whom are 
attributable most of the large fires. 

Great forests of giant pines and oaks have been 
consumed in this fire, their actual value for tim- 
ber and fuel running into fabulous sums, but it is 
not the loss of the trees for their intrinsic value 
that falls the heaviest, but bare mountains are 
but poor water-sheds, and when once denuded, the 
natural re-foresting takes many years. In some 
places the trees will never grow again. This fire 
started near the mouth of the Big Santa Anita, run- 
ning up that great canyon, and going over the 
ridge to the Little Santa Anita. The land below, 
some 50,000 acres, is dependent for its water sup- 
ply on these two canyons and their natural drain- 
age of ridges and small canyons. Santa Anita, 
Sierra Madre and a number of large ranches, all 
highly cultivated, and with fine irrigating systems, 
are the prey of this fire just as much as if the 
flames had swept away homes and orchards. 
Without water our paradise would become a des- 
ert, and as our mountains are given over to de- 
struction, just so surely will the water supply be- 
come reduced. Slowly the great need of the pres- 
ervation of our forests is being realized, and or- 
ganizations are being formed to secure proper leg- 
islation in that direction. It is the duty of every 
citizen of this State, whether directly interested 
or not, to assist in every way in their power 
this movement, which means so much to our pros- 
perity. A striking case of total indifference was 
manifested by an orchardist who owns a fine or- 
ange orchard right at the mouth of the Santa 
Anita. The flames were running up the mountain 
in plain sight, and when asked why he was not 
fighting the fire, and trying to save his water sup- 
ply, he calmly remarked that "it is too hot to fight 
fire and my deed called for so much water any 
way." The deed may call for the water, but the 
rancher may call for it in vain. Few realize the 
importance of active work in this direction. Forty 
men are bravely fighting the flames but the old 
adage "an ounce of prevention worth a pound of 
cure" fits the subject in hand to a nicety. 

The pictures which accompany this article were 
taken by the Graphic's regular artist. On his re- 



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turn he looked like he had been dragged by wild 
horses. Commenting on his trip he said: 

"Leaving the team at the base of the mount- 
ains, I 'broke brush' up a long ridge, and came 
in above where the fire was crossing into the Little 
Santa Anita. The fire was raging fiercely above 
me, and in making my way to a suitable place for 
taking photographs, the ridge led into an unburnt 
section like an inverted 'V.' The breeze was blow- 
ing steadily from the west, and all unconscious of 
danger, one of the cameras was set in position, 
when without warning, the wind suddenly 
changed, bringing the fire down the canyon at a 
terrific pace, the flames mounting fifty and seven- 
ty-five feet in the air. The roar was louder than 
a dozen batteries of artillery, and great masses of 
rocks, liberated by the fire, came down the mount- 
ain sides, breaking down trees and brush. The 
heat was intense, and at times the smoke was 
blown down in volumes, miking it difficult to 
breathe. I was there for pictures, and pointing 
the machine at random pressed the bulb, and then 



Literary Gossip 

Conducted by^^NgGarner Curr^n 

ON "The Redemption of David Corson," 
Charles Frederick Goss has written a novel 
which is already a success — a triumph 
which is attested by the fact that it is now in its 
sixth edition. It is a novel which will be attractive 
for two reasons; first, because of the story, sec- 
ondly and chiefly, because of the strong picture of 
mental travail that it contains. Few novelists 
have essayed to take the human mind to the 
heights of spiritual exaltation and then to the 
depths of agnostic despair and then slowly and 
painfully up the height again, as Mr. Goss takes 
the mind of Davin Corson. But that is not all. 
While David travels downward, one other — yes, 
two others, catching some of his spiritual enthu- 
siasm at the moment of its perfection, are travel- 
ing upward to the light which they have never 
known. One of these is, singularly enough, the 
young woman, a passion for whom has lead him 
astray. The other is a rude woodchopper, one of 
a party for whose salvatioji David nad, in common 
other Quakers, labored in vain. It is a striking 
contrast of development that is thus presented. 
The woodchopper, after his sudden conversion at 
the moment of David's fall, does not reappear in 
the story till near its end; but the young woman 
is his daily companion in the story, and in the 
contrasting courses of the two there is an interest- 
ing study. The lesson of it all seems to be that 
that which is good cannot die. There may be 
transmutation, but there cannot be destruction, 
even by the former successful instrumentality. 
As David preached his Quaker convictions he 
sowed the seed of redemption in a gypsy soul. The 
light which he cast from him was picked up by 
one who was to bring it to him again when he 
needed it most. The book abounds in dramatic 
situations — the rescue of the gypsy waif by the 
medicine fakir, the discovery by David of his pa- 
rentage. David's renunciation of his faith, the 
roadside battle for the possession of a woman, 
the separation after the revelation in New Orleans, 
the meeting of David and the fakir in New York, 
and the reappearance in the slums of the light 
which was to lead David back to home and peace 
and God. The scene of the story is laid mainly 
in the Miami valley of Ohio and in Cincinnati 
about the middle of the century, so that for Ohio- 
ans it has a peculiar interest. But the local color 
is only an incident. The theme and its develop- 
ment are the essentials. The story was well worth 
writing and merits the widest reading. 

"Smiles Yoked With Sighs" is the title of 
Robert .1. Burdett's new book of verses, a title 
which be drew from "Cymbeline." The fun of the 
verses is brought out by Will Vawter, who fur- 
nishes drawings for nearly every page. There is 
great variety in these jingles; they touch on many 
themes, and there are few things from which 




foreground is an unburnt ridge and in the distance is the devastated east 
side of tlie Big Santa Anita canyon. I'hoto by Graphic artist. 



did record time down the canyon. The fire gained 
steadily, but a bare ridge was in sight, and as I 
made for it, I stopped several times and took 
'snaps.' The pencil pusher was wise enough not 
to go into the trap, and when I was safely out, 
assisted me with the cameras. It was the hottest 
work I was ever detailed on, and may God have 
pity on the brave men who are risking a terrible 
death to save the mountains and preserve the wa- 
ter-shed." 



The pen may be mightier than the sword, but a 
man would give a whole gross of the former for a 
stout hickory club when he is being chased around 
a house by a bull dog. 

Worrying is one of the greatest drawbacks to 
happiness. Most of it can be avoided if we de- 
termine not to let trifles annoy us, for the largest 
amount of worry is caused by the smallest trifles. 



they don't extract humor. What makes them so 
readable is that they are apparently written with- 
out effort and, like Burdette's prose sketches, the 
joke always comes in an unexpected way. A 
specimen of these humorous poems is the follow- 
ing, which is called "The Plaint of Jonah:" 

Why should I live, when every day 

The wicked prospers in his way 

And daily adds unto his hoard. 

While cut worms smite the good man's gourd? 

When I would rest beneath the shade 

Comes the shrill-voiced book-selling maid, 

And smites me with her tireless breath — 

Then am I angry unto death. 

When I would slumber in my booth. 

Who conies with accents loud and smooth, 

And talks from dawn to midnight late? 

The honest labor candidate. 

Who pounds my ear with noisy talk. 

Whose brazen gall no ire can balk, 



Western Graphic 



9 



And wearies me of life's short span? 

The accident insurance man. 

And when, all other torments flown. 

I think to call one hour mine own. 

Who takes my leisure by the throat? 

The villain taking up a vote. 

Mr. Vawter has shown great versatility in his 
sketches, which are as amusing as the poems. 
The book is finely printed and bound. 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co. have in press four farces 
by Mr. Howells which have never been reprinted 
from the magazines in which they appeared. 
They are entitled "Bride Roses," "Indian Giver," 
"The Smoking Car" and "Room 45." They are 
bright, deliciously humorous, exquisitely refined, 
and charming in style, which is a matter of course, 
since Mr. Howells wrote them. They will be 



brought out in little volumes of attractive typog- 
raphy, simply and artistically bound. 

■ < Jl 

The fiction in Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly 
for July includes, besides the Sheridan-like end- 
ing of Egerton Castle's "Hath Comedy." a quaintly 
humeroiis New England story by Rollin Lynde 
Hartt, and a Cape Cod idyll called "In Old Mano- 
met Village." by Etta W. Pierce. The poetry and 
"Marginalia" include contributions by Edgar Faw- 
cett, William Hamilton Hayne. Norman H. Pit- 
man, Frank Lawrence .Jones, Ethel West and Mary 
Sargent Hopkins. 

The story "Knights in Fustian." which has just 
been published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co., is the 
work of a young Indianian whose name is not 
"Caroline Brown," though that cognomen appears 
on the title page of her novel. 



i 




Music and Art 

Criticism and Comment *>» J5he Doings of Artistic Folk 




Other countries than ours are far richer in the 
possession of those peculiar characteristics in their 
so-called "national music" as exhibited in the pop- 
ular song and dance-tunes traditionally preserved 
by the country people and the lower classes of so- 
ciety, which form the great majority of the na- 
tion. The views and sentiments of the uneducated 
and the simple-minded are less subjected to ex- 
ternal influences than are those which are pass- 



nineteenth century, however, that this interest has 
taken root with the public and has found its grad- 
ual development. This is largely due to the fact 
that the public has discovered that many of the 
composers have spoken in the musical idiom of the 
people; that they have taken the folk-tunes and 
made of them things of beauty and of art. The 
influence of folk-music came with the Romantic 
school; lightly with Hadyn, Beethoven and Sehu- 





The upper picture was taken at a distance of over two milea from tin- battling ridge. 

Over a mile of burning mountains are shown. Tile lower, a hazardous snap. The Graphic 
artist was running at break-neek speed ilown this eanyon with the fire in close pursuit. 
Stopping momentarily to Secure this pieture. The flames were less than ten feet distant. 
This enjjravinn «ives a splendid illustration of the fiereeness of the fire. 



ed through the chaldron of musical enlighten- 
ment and progress. Leavened as is this country 
with sentiments from every nationality in the 
world it is not surprising, in the further absence 
of a distinctively "peasant" class, we cannot boast 
of "national music." A far wider interest in the 
folk-songs and folk-tunes of other nations is there- 
by felt with us than is the case in other countries 
who have inherited treasures of their own. A 
great deal of attention has been devoted by our 
singers during the past few years to these folk 
songs, lectures have been delivered upon them 
and illustrative songs have been interestingly and 
understanding^ presented. The subject has a wide 
fascination, and its investigation has resulted in 
giving some semblance to the claim that we pos- 
sess a type of national music in the aboriginal 
chants and songs of our Indians. Investigation 
has resulted in the writing and publishing of many 
learned and instructive books bearing on this sub- 
ject. The bibliography of the European national 
music is, however, far more elaborate, and students 
of this interesting branch of music need not be at 
a loss for material wherewith to equip themselves 
in its study. It is only since the beginning of the 



bert, who handled Hungarian tunes tenderly and 
almost questionly; but more impetuously and 
warmly by Chopin and Liszt, whose Polish and 
Magyar melodies, present, despite elaborate em- 
bellishments, the fire and passion of the original 
stock. Mendelssohn, with the "Fingals-Hoehle" 
overture, put local color on the musical palette, 
and (lade, Grieg, Smetana, Tshaikowsky, Rim- 
sky-Korsakow, Dvorak and others have followed 
in his footsteps. Folk-music, it must be borne In 
mind, is the spontaneous utterance of a people, 
without the influence of what we call Art. Grimm 
said that a folk-song "composes itself.'" The 
songs have as their burden the woes, joys, aspi- 
rations of a people, not of an individual. No one 
man composed a folk-song; they have been passed 
down through generations until they represent a 
national trait or have a distinctly typical meaning 
or purpose. In this way our own slave songs are 
creations by a people rather than by any one sing- 
er, out of which grew such really national songs 
as Foster's "Old Folks at Home" and others of 
that class, which have become part and parcel of 
our national tendency. Harmonizing and dressing 
up Is injurious to the vitality of a folk-tune. The 



GARDEN INGI 
1 1 CALIFORNIA I 



...BY... 
W.S.LYONS 



156 PACK 

ll.l.l STKA ' 

HMHOSSKIl 
I'APKN : 
COVERS : 



*T»HE ONLY WORK 
* ever written for this 
soil unci climate; entirely 
non-technical and espe- 
cially adapted to amateurs. 
Heretofore -...!< I at so CCIltS, 
will be reduced to close 
out an edition to 

( cuts 

postage. 




I 



2 5 

and three cent 



I 



GEO. RICE & SONS, inc. % 

311-313 | 
New High St. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL I 

» BOOK 3TORK8 " ^ 




A Tempting 
Proposition 

TEN-CENT OIL STOf'K 

A better one is a $2i no Life Insur- 
ance for$15a year in the popular 

Order of The Iroquois 

incorporated under the laws of 
the State of New York. For par- 
ticulars and literature send oard 
t" r. M. ( II A I'M AN 

250 N. Union Ave., L. A. 

*S~ Deputies make good pay 
Several wanted for this territory. 



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The | 

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Man \ 

\ is as much of a necessity as the summer 

g girl, and needs a proportionate amount 

i of attention. See our novelty flannel \ 

J negligee suits, as low as i I 0.00, and 

i all the fixings that go well with them. 

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LONDON CLOTHINO COMPANY | 

£ HARRIS 4. FRANK, Pnora % 

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MISS GOODIN 

Florist.. 



Te\ James 2311 
Res. Tel. Blue 456 

Orders for Cut Flowers 

and all kinds ol floral and 
decorative work carefully 
attended to. 



j 440 S. Broadway 



All Wc Ask is Comparison 

of Goods and Prices 

New Carpets and Rugs 

Suits Hundreds of others and will suit you 

3x7 Shades only 45 Cents 




I. T. MARTIN 



IVherl Clin in 
.s|>klN(l ST. sold or rented 



vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv 

* * 

** Washstand Slabs, Table Tops, Coping, Foot- «• 

* warmers, Hitching l'osts. Soapstone and Ser- J 
9 pentine from Catalina Island. <t 
** All kinds of stone and marble work at lowest * 
J prices. We quarry and manufacture. Whole- jj 
p sale and retail. * 

I BANNING CO. \ 

* Tel. 36 222 S. Spring St. J 
m * 

««««ftft»ftftft»«ftftftftft»ftftft«ftft»A«ftft««ft«ft 

BellOWB; "What makes you fear that your son, 
who went to Australia to make his fortune, 1b 
dead ?" 

Kellows (with a siRh I : "He hasn't Written for 
money for nearly two months." 



10 



Western Graphic 



MUSIC AND ART ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 

VOICE 

COMPOSITION 
THEORY 



Phone Main Sitf 



230 Hellman Block 



ARNOLD KRAUSS 

SOLOIST AND VIOLIN TEACHEK 

Pupil oi Cesar Thomson 
Studio: 807 W. Seventh st. Tel. Green 1558 



H A R L E Y 



HAMILTON 



CONCERT VIOLINIST AND TEACHER 
Ensemble playing a specialty. 
Musical Director Los Angeles Theatre. 
Pupil of Emile Sauret, London, and Slmonetti, Loudon. 

Studio, 320-321 Blanchard Building 



CHARLES F. 



E D S O N 



BASSO CANT ANTE 
Engagements Accepted for 

Concert, Oratorio Studio 
AND Opera ... 611 WITMER STREET 

Telephone James 78 



MORTON F. MASON 

Teacher of Piano, Organ and Harmony 

Orgauist Pasadena Presbyterian Church 
Studio: Blauchard building Residence : 250 State Street 

Los Angeles Pasadena 

MISS MIRIAM B. BARNES 

Piano Soloist and Teacher of the Piano 
Pupil of 

Herr Thilo Becke r 253 SOUTH GRAND AVE 

MRS. LUCIA M. BURNETT 

PIANO SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

Pupil Wm. Sherwood, Chicago 1006 W. Washington St. 

charlesIe. pemb e r t o n 

HARMONY COUNTERPOINT 
COMPOSITION VIOLIN 

Studio Tajo Block, cor. 1st 4 Brd'y Residence 632 Burliugton 



MRS. J. 



M. 



JONES 



TEACHER OF THE HARP 
Address care of So. Cal. Music Co. RESIDENCE: 
216 W. Third St., Los Angeles Lincoln Park 

MADAME MARIE HUNI 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Classical Music a Specialty. 
Studio, 628 S. Hill Street Los Angeles 



D. H. 



MORRISON 



VOICE BUILDING 

77 and 78 Potomac Block 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



MISS MAUDE PRIEST 

GUITAR LESSONS 
Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Pupil M. S. Arevalo STUDIO: 452% So: Broadway 
Room 25 

XT" WILLHARTITZ 

Piano, Harmony, Composition, Etc. 
Los Angeles 311 BLANCHARD MUSIC and ART BLDG 

EDW A rF& W AR REN 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR 

STUDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall 
Mornings at Pasadena Directoi Throop Institute 

Afternoons at Los Angeles Mandolin and Guitar Club 

ROLLA E. GARDN E^R 

ill St 



BANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR 

String Orchestra Siuuio, 244 South H 

Blanchard Hall 2 "*™* 

Building devoted to Music and Art. 
Auditorium, seating 800, can be engaged for Music- 
ales, Receptions, Lectures, Dances, etc. 
Rehearsal and Lecture Rooms for rent. 
Forty Studios— single and en suite. 
Public Art Gallery open daily, 1 to 4 p. m. 
For any information apply to 

F. W. BLANCHARD 



LADIES 

Have your Freckles Removed 

B y Uslngtne Original Freckle Salve 

PREPARED only by 

O. F\ HEINZEMAIN 

222 North CHEMIST 

Main Street ^r*> Price 50 CtS. 



To the Deaf 

A Ach lady, cured of her deafness and noises in 
the head by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drums, 
gave $100,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people 
unable to procure the Ear Drums, may have them 
free. Address No. 532c, The Nicholson Institute, 
780 Eighth Avenue, New York. 5-7-01 



simpler and more unpretentious the harmony used 
in accompanying, the more effective the song. Our 
plantation negroes strummed their banjoes with- 
out a knowledge of anything further than the 
chords which gave a pleasant consonance, or em- 
phasized the spirit of what they were singing. To 
the serious investigator there is a difficult study 
which presents ethnological, geographical and even 
climatic phases to account for the divergence of 
the peoples and nationalities, while the historical 
aspect is one of richness unsuspected. The peo- 
ples of the North are predisposed to the minor 
mode, while those of the South prefer the major. 
Then conies the rhythmic and intervallic elements, 
while the investigation cannot be complete unless 
the bearings of racial relations, religious and social 
customs are daily weighed. In the songs of the 
Russians of today, as with Scandinavians, Ger- 
mans and their ante-types in America, and in the 
games which accompany many of the songs, there 
are frequent allusions to the gods and goddesses of 
pagan days of the misty past. In the songs and 
(lances of the American Indians and the slaves, 
more or less remotely connected with Africa, these 
traits also show very plainly, so that, in fact, the 
study of American types is one of the most in- 
teresting that could be prosecuted. Edward Ever- 
ett Hale, as well as Dr. Dvorak has expressed the 
view that the slave song is 'the only American 
music," while other more thorough workers, have 
been gathering from all sources the relics of ante- 
war times in order to preserve them, when the 
rag-time perversion passes away — and this, in a 
way, may be looked on as a sort of revival of the 
interest in Afro-American melodies — a serious study 
of the only music to which we can lay the title of 
"folk" will certainly follow. In tracing the sources 
of this music, the investigators will delve into his- 
tory, the African question will be "illuminated as 
has never been done before. It is curious to know 
in this connection, that some years ago, when Dr. 
Dvorak was investigating this subject, he invited 
the attention of composers to certain songs which 
Mr. Krehbiel and others had gathered, and asked 
.lis negro pupils at the National Conservatory to 
make an essay at original work in this direction. 
The result, despite the inventiveness of the ne- 
groes, was unsatisfactory, for through their recog- 
nition of the intervallic rhythm as paramount, the 
"coon song ragtime" of today has supplanted "Old 
Dan Tucker" and "Zip Coon" of fifty years ago, 
with no compensating advantage. Environment 
plays also a great part In the making of a 'folk- 
song." We are perhaps more familiar with the sad, 
sorrowful, religious and other songs of our ne- 
groes than we are with those of a more common- 
place cast, which, however, were as important to 
them, and betrayed a more comfortable and satis- 
fied condition than those of weightier import. One 
of these was' the jolly "Barnyard Cackle" which 
was always given with a spirit and gusto that ap- 
pealed irresistibly to very hearer, white or black, 
One verse will demonstrate the extreme simplicity 
of the theme: 

Rooster in de chicken coop crowin' fo' day. 

Horses in de stable go nay, nay, nay, 

Ducks in de yard go quack, quack, quack, quack. 

And de geese goes filley-l-fee. 
Pigs in de pen a-squalin' fo' slop. 
Big dogs barkin' like dey never will stop; 
Guineas in de tree go pot-rack, pot-rack, 
And de goose goes fllley-I-fee. 

Illustrative, pictorial and faithful is this homely 
description of the plantation negro's surroundings, 
and the music to which he welds it "by ear" and 
out of the depth of his untutored yet emotional 
soul, is singularly melodious and apt. The dance 
plays a great part in the folk music of any nation 
and the negro was devoted at all times to this ex- 
pression in various "tunes," one of the best known 
and most enjoyable of which was the corn shuck- 
ing song that went with the "rabbit dance." 

After the introduction, which ran as follows: 
"Early one morning on my massa's farm, 

Cut dat pigeon-wing, Lizy Jane, 
I heard dem chickens givin' de alarm, 
Shake yo' feet Miss Lizy Jane." 
the hilarity becomes more extended, the spirit 
warms up, the hand-clapping and time-beating 
grow more boisterous and soon in tempestuous 
swing the song goes on: 
"Shake y' feet, niggers, it'll soon be day, 

Shoot along lively, Miss Lizy Jane, 

Massa ketch us dancin' there'll be to pay, 

We got to dig 'taiters and hoe dat corn. 

Hit dat dubble-shuffle, Lizy Jane; 
You'd better be a-humpin', coz it soon be morn. 

Shake dat balmoral, Lizy Jane." 

This is distinctive music of the folk type. Ne- 
gro minstrelsy was brought into vogue by "Jim 
Crow" Rice and the departure from the standard 
was due to the favor with which blackened faces 
and pseudo-folk songs were received. Rice's first 
song was in negro dialect and devoted to the vic- 
tory of Plattsburg, the refrain to which was: 
"Turn about and wheel about, and jump jes' so, 
Turn about and wheel about and jump, Jim Crow." 

Edwin P. Christy, who came next with Christy's 
Minstrels, some fifty years ago, had been a resi- 
dent of New Orleans, where, in a rope-walk, he 
heard the negro laborers, either "composing" the 
songs to fit their occupation, or revoicing the old- 
er one that had come down to them through tradi- 
tion or racial usage. Christy's songs were dis- 
tinctive, however, in that they were about negro 



people and not by them, and gems of the early 
minstrel collection were "Old Uncle Ned," "Dandy 
Jim of Caroline," "Lucy Neal" and others that 
the middle-aged vaudevillian of today will doubt- 
less recall, and possibly with regret. Bona-flde 
negroes have had their essay at "negro minstrels," 
with the queer result that these were imitating 
white men who were imitating negroes. Some of 
the negro companies, like the "Jubilee Singers" 
;md the "Nashville Students" give us in their 
programs gems of African songs of the real sort, 
and "Roll. Jordan, Roll," comes much nearer the 
hand-clapping or "patting" which accompanies so 
much of the singing of the negro is a distinctive 
trait which is not given its full value by those 
who witness it. The negro has his own music and 
his own way of giving expression to the feelings 
that stir him. One of these is the habit of beating 
time, which a distinguished and scholarly African 
prelate, Bishop Turner, said was natural and from 
which he, himself, despite his training and asso- 
ciations found it impossible to refrain. "It's the 
African in me," he said. As to the interest that 
is growing and spreading in this branch of music, 
and the laudable desire to establish a national 
class of music for this country, by unearthing and 
bringing together all the remnants of the music of 
once sadly persecuted race, it may be stated that a 
number of clubs devoting themselves to the study 
of folk music are now flourishing in various parts 
of the country, and in the South it has been found 
that there is a plentitude of material which only 
awaits judicious sifting. New words have come 
in, but the old song, the old rythm, the old sway- 
ing of the body, and the beating of the feet and 
hands are the same at all the gatherings where the 
negro still preserves much of the characteristics 
of ante-bellum days. As one writer has observed, 
that although Art is great. Nature is still older 
and greater, and her teachings were burned in by 
the sun, and so the rising and falling cadence of 
Africa has become a type where her people were 
forcibly brought, along with their customs. 

E. F. KUBEL. 

-i ,< 

After a year's hard work Miss Anna Virginia 
Metcalfe is off for a three months' vacation in the 
mountains of Colorado. Miss Marie Metcalfe ac- 
companies her on the trip. 



E D U C A T 



0 N A L 



| Brownsberger 
Home School .... 



Shorthand and Typewriting 4 

y 808 South Broadway. Tel. White 487 1 & 

!j? This institution owns the largest number % 

* of tj-pewriters of any school in California s? 

•x Touch method in typew riting exclusively. More posi- 

jJ tions are offered to the school at a go d salary than 

C we can fill. Onlv individual work. Office training. 

4 Machine at home free. Hours !> to 12; 1.30 to 4 30 

JP SPECIAL SUMHER RATES 



) loj^e/ej /Dl)p \ 



1 

212 W. Third St. Tel. Black 2051 jjf 

•;t Oldest, largest and best training school in the city. »■ 
if Thorough, practical courses of study in Bookkeeping, 

# Shorthand, Typewriting and Telegraphy. College * 

^ trained and experienced teachers. Rest equipped # 

3f Business College room West of Chicago. This is the * 
f onlv school in the city that hns the right of using the 

•ir Budget of Voucher System of Bookkeeping. Come and & 

3f see it. Our students have the advantage of Spanish, »- 

-M German and Lou V. Chapin's Course of Lectures free. * 

£ It will cost you nothing to investigate the merits of 4- 

ij« our school before going elsew here. Special rates for + 

the summer. Catalogue and full information on ap- *■ 

9 plication. Address £ 

L. A. Business College. 21 2 W. Third St., L. A. j 

^ !M> 

Los Angeles 



I Military Academy f 



Begins its seventh year September 25th. 
Classical, English and Scientific Courses. 
The so-mmon branches thoroughly taught. 
£ Prepares for business. 
' Sanford A. Hooper, Head Master 
I Edward L. Hardy, Associate 
f Catalogue mailed upon request. Visitors 
? take Westlake (First street) Traction cars. 

f , fe^'fe^'fe#)V^(«^<#^ , fer*^r*'i^Vt»)'fe^^»)f 



Los Angeles School 
ol Dramatic Art . . . 



Incorporated Sept. 1S99 



Tel. James 711 



Training for the Platform, Pulpit and Stage. Cultivation of 
the Speaking Voice for every purpose. 

Directors— G. A. Dobinson, John I). Ilooker, W. C. Patter- 
sou, B. K. Baumgardt, Sheldon Borden. 

The Art Building, 614 S. Hill St., f.nn Angeles 



Western Graphic 11 
With the Butterflies 

Doings ^ Among ^ People ^ in the ^ Gay ^5 Life 



Miss Miriam Barnes, accompanied by two of her 
pupils, will enjoy her vacation during the month 
of August in San Francisco, returning the first 
week in September. 

A musicale was given Tuesday evening at Blan- 
chard Hall for the relief of the famine sufferers in 
India, the following assisting in the program: 
Mexican Band, C. S. DeLano's Guitar and Banjo 
Club, Mrs. Frank Bryson, Miss Lulu Baker, Miss 
Roberta Merritt, Miss Grace Ciark, Edw. Quinlan, 
Arthur M. Perry, Miss Jessie Goodwin, Miss Grace 
Freebey, Miss Blanche Kottmeir, Mrs. Kannon, 
Messrs. A. J. Stamm, Edw. Kuster, and Ernest L. 
Howen. The program was well selected. Arthur 
M. Perry's violin solo, "Reverie," was well ren- 
dered, as was Miss Goodwin's soprano solo, "Since 
First We Met," by Rubenstein, which was sub- 
stituted for one of Verdi's. 

Mr. Edwin H. Clark and wife and Miss Ella 
Heinzeman have arrived at Oakland on their return 
from Russian river, where they have been camp- 
ing for the past few weeks. The daily memoranda 
kept by the party and forwarded to a friend in 
this city contains many interesting as well as sur- 
prising facts. Even a hasty perusal of the entries 
is sufficient to convince any one that Russian 
river is a misnomer, it should be Paradise. Cata- 
lina people may talk fish as loudly as they please, 
but when Russian river is mentioned hereafter 
they will simply have to take a seat on the back 
row. At certain hours of the day — early morning 
and at sundown — the surface of the river is one 
great mass of fish, so dense that to row through 
it would be impossible. Such a thing as the use of 
a hook and line in that locality is unknown. If 
you want a fish for breakfast, luncheon or dinner, 
all you have to do is to simply go down to the 
river's edge and whistle. In a moment myriads of 
the finny tribe will come flashing to the spot and 
turn over on their backs ready for your inspection 
and selection. As for live game, the country is 
plethoric with all kinds. A gun is a useless in- 
cumbrance there. Should you wish a plump young 
rabbit for the pot or frying pan, you pick up a 
handful of salt, go outside and select your titbit, 
sprinkle a little of the salt on the small bunch of 
cotton that every respectable rabbit invariably 
carries about with him, and there you are. 
t£ t$ 

On Saturday afternoon last Mrs. H. T. Lee, of 
West Twenty-eighth street, gave a reception to 
Mrs. Jirah D. Cole, of Chicago, formerly director of 
the Treble Clef Club, who is here on a visit for the 
summer. A large gathering was present, among 
them many old members of the club, who extended 
an affectionate welcome to their former conductor. 
As was quite natural where the occasion was 
marked by the presence of so large a number of 
those identified with music, much of the afternoon 
was given up to vocal and instrumental perform- 
ance Madame Martinez, the present musical di- 
rector of the Treble Clef Club, contributed three 
numbers in her usual charming and artistic man- 
ner. Miss Blanche Rogers, Mrs. E. K. Meeker, 
Mrs. Scott, Miss O'Donoghue, Mrs. Walton, Miss 
Winston, Mrs. Ogilvie, Miss Showalter and others 
also participated. Elaborate refreshments were 
served during the afternoon. 

(,5^ 

The astounding announcement appeared in the 
columns of an esteemed local contemporary re- 
cently, that the "early remains of John Sebastian 
Bach, which had been discovered at Leipsic only 
on October 22, 1894, will be interred on the 150th 
anniversary of his death," etc. That Bach, dear 
old Bach, could have been the actual bona fide 
possessor of two "remains" of himself is a very 
startling revelation to his devoted worshippers of 
the present day, as well as to that stiff-necked, 
cynical general public for whom music hath no 
charms. If this "early remains" discovery be true, 
then the very pertinent question arises: Why 
should there not be other remains of the grand old 
master quietly reposing here and there within the 
sheltering bosom of mother earth, ready to be 
found if we will only search a little? 

As there are now in proper custody — figuratively 
speaking — his "early" and "late" remains, there 
can be no reasonable objection to an intelligent, 
but reverent, look around for enough of his addi- 
tional remains to complete a full set, that is, an 
"early," "earlier," "earliest," "late," "later," 
"latest," anu "intermediate" remains. If this could 
be accomplished, they would make the finest col- 
lection of remains of one particular human biped 
ever exhibited on this mundane sphere, k only re- 
mains for us to add, that no matter how many 
John Sebastian Bachs may be iound, each and 
every one of them will be tenderly and reverently 
recommitted to earth in some permanent and well- 
marked location, for the benefit of future genera- 
tions. 

Madame Isidora Martinez, assisted by Miss Ada 
Showalter, pianist, will give a summer evening 
song recital at the Gordon Arms, Terminal Island, 
on Thursday of next week, August 2nd, under the 
concert direction of J. T. Fitzgerald. This will be 
the first of several being arranged to be given dur- 
ing the summer months. 



Most men who complain that the world does 
not understand them ought to be glad of it. 



REALLY, it is too aggravating. Since those 
high "flyers" were put on to Santa Monica 
you actually have to be on time. It is an 
imposition. Why, last summer it was always so 
nice and convenient. When it came round to the 
hour and minutes for leaving you were perfectly 
safe to go up Broadway and have plenty of time 
to exchange a shirt waist, select a pattern, match 
your filoselle, buy a steak, telephone to all your 
friends to tell (no pun please) them you were off 
and kiss John good-bye. 

But now? Mercy! If you are not there they go 
on without you. And when you do come on the 
minute hand they wisk you off just as soon as you 
get your foot on the top step, and by the time 
you have recovered enough breath to look around, 
all you can see as the car spins along is a razzle 
dazzle sort of picture puzzle in the dim distance 
with a hazy white object fluttering at the top — it is 
John waving his pocket handkerchief. Dear me. 
It is enough to give one nervous prostration. 

And then time was that you could take a seat 
comfortably, spread your portfolio on your lap and 
write back to John all about the charming scenery 
down by Hollywood, how refreshing the first whiff 
of sea air was, and you could just go into all sorts 
of rhapsodies, but now? You are in luck if you 
can manage to hold on at all and the only way to 
get your letter written is to write it at home and 
give it to John before you start. My, my! To 
think that they really take some of our best people 
and drop them down in front of the Arcadia all in 
the space of fifty minutes. It is a wonder those 
Arcadians don't kick. Think of having people of 
leisure brought panting in to dinner. But it is no 
use to say anything. The last time I went down 
to the Pacific railway office to complain and ask 
Mr. Clark for a pass to Santa Monica for me and 
John and John's folks wno are coming out from 
Ioway for the sixteenth annual tournament of the 
Southern California lawn tennis association to be 
held at the Casino the week beginning August 13th 
— he smiled. He wasn't a bit scared, but took the 
very next flyer himself and went down to the Ar- 
cadia for dinner. No use talking. I wonder where 
woman's rights are any way. It seems to me I 
haven't heard tell of any for a year or two now. 
i$8 t$ 

They say people are hard to please. It isn't so. 
They are easy to please, a gentleman said to me 
the other day: "Your stuff last week was very 
entertaining. You said, I believe, you copied half 
of it out of an Eastern journal.' 

Think of that. "No, indeed, I guess not," I made 
haste to say. "Copied half? It is a libel. I never 
did anything of the sort. I copied all of it. That 
was perhaps the reason you liked it unusually." 
I never try to please people any more. They are 
just as much pleased without trying. In fact, 
sometimes when three or four pages "lose" some 
way or other, do you know it's all the same. It 
makes ji'st as much sense as if it were all there. 

We had such an experience, John and I, at a 
swell ball the other night — Saturday night. I 
wouldn't like to tell you which hotel it was — for 
then you would know. But they all have them. 
You see when you get invited to a thing and stay 
all night and pay your room rent and your meal 
ticket next morning, or longer — you can stay as 
long as you pay — it is not always definitely stated 
in the "bid" whether you are to "appear" in full 
dress or not. So John and I didn't know what to 
do. We thought it would be so nice if we could 
take a peep into the dining room first and see what 
the rest did. But that had its drawbacks. When 
I began to dress, John was scared. He said, "You 
are not going to put that on " "Well," I said, 
"this is the only dress I've got, so I think I'd better 
put it on, don't you?" John agreed, out he thought 
we had better not go in to dinner. "I'll tell you 
what to do," I said. "Just drop down stairs 
casually and saunter up and down before the din- 
ing room door and see if you see any low necks, 
and then come and tell me." After a while John 
came back and he said: "We're in for it now; I 
do not see a single cut-a-way dress." "Well, I 
shant give up the battle," said I, "and besides it 
is early yet. People, you know, don't go in to 
dinner before seven." So I put on my new- 
spangled "gown;" I wasn't going to mind if I did 
lose two or three sequins on a grand occasion once 
in a while. John looked worried, but I fixed my 
expression to look as if I was used to going in to 
dinner just like that every day In my life and we 
started. 

At the door I began to feel a trifle shaky, but I 
took hold of John's hand — that Is to say, little 
John's hand — otherwise demi-.Iohn's. I knew that 
if one just has hold of something you do not have 
that gone feeling, and you can sail in with your 
heart in its proper place. And then those floors 
are glazed like an ice pond in January, and I assure 
you if you don't take care you are likely to slip off 
just as you are making your grandest detour. 
Well, I took John's— demi-John's— hand and 
walked in as if I went in to dinner three times a 
day, three hundred and sixty-five or sixty-six days 
in the year just that way. As we sat down John 



looked at me and I looked at John, and the look 
spoke chapters. We were all right. Everybody 
\\:is dressed thai you mighl think then had bMD 
a drop in clothes — that is to say, a "cut;" oh, 1 
mean clothes were "way down." I never saw such 
a brilliant assemblage, as the newspapers say. 
Then the ball. It was immense. Do you know 
there never were so many men at resorts before 
as there are this summer. The summer girl isn't 
in it. The summer boy is all in evidence. I can't 
imagine where he all comes from. But now at 
seaside balls you never see girls dancing together. 
It is quite the reverse. It is a problem and every- 
body is discusing it, and — by the way. I meant to 
illustrate my story by a pointer that I am afraid 
would never be noticed if it were not pointed out 
— that when you go to a small hotel dance on a 
Saturday night don't dress too much when you go 
in to dinner. The less the better. Moral? He who 
runs may read — between the words. 

^8 i 

My dear, there are still things going on in town 
by the people who can afford to stop at home. 
There are a number of affairs; some have just 
gone, others are going before. I did hear Miss 
Helen Howes was giving a luncheon, or had given 
it — I have forgotten which— for her young friend 
Miss Annis Van Nuys. Miss Annis, by the way, is 
receiving lots of attention since her return for her 
s\immer vacation. This luncheon, I dare say, will 
be among the swellest, for, of course, Mrs. Howes 
and her daughter do entertain beautifully. Then 
Miss Ellis will give a card party snortly for her 
friends which will be a large affair and include 
guests from all ends of town, as well as from her 
immediate neighborhood about St. James' Park. 

Among other young people who have not ceased 
to entertain is Miss Sterry, daughter of Judge C. 
N. Sterry, of the Wilshire Boulevard. One evening 
last week Miss Sterry entertained about forty 
young people as a special compliment to three 
young ladies from Arizona who are spending the 
summer in Los Angeles; Miss Riordan and Miss 
Elizabeth Riordan, the charming daughters of Col. 
B. M. Riordan of Tucson, and pretty Miss Ains- 
worth, who is visiting here from Phoenix, Arizona. 
. The engagement of Miss Evelyn Gwynne to Mr. 
Carroll Allen cannot be called altogether a "de- 
lightful surprise," but it is eminently satisfactory 
to all parties interested. The young lady was 
quite a belle — as her sister, Miss Alice, is now — 
before her European trip, and the advantages 
that are inseparable from travel have but added to 
her charms. The wedding may be looked forward 
to as one of the brilliant social events of the com- 
ing season. It is to take place early in the fall. 

v«* 

There were millions in the party that went down 
to Santa Monica on Saturday night for the Arcadia 
hop. There was Mr. Joseph Chanslor to begin 
with. Then there was the Mr. Lewellyn of iron 
works fame, Mr. Sam Haskins, Mr. Pedley of Riv- 
erside, Mr. Gerald Fitzgerald of Duarte, but, come 
to think of it, Mr. Fitzgerald was stopping at the 
hotel at the time and so was the automobile, and I 
quite assure you there was regret when the last 
was seen of that automobile steered by the hand- 
some Englishman straight toward home. Mr. 
Fitzgerald feared the fires raging on the hills 
might find his ranch and he departed. 

I do not know whether this is "all the news all 
the time," but I can't think of anything else worth 
mentioning, and then besides, who wants to read, 
this hot weather. It is getting so hot John and I 
think of going to the beach for a while. Only I 
am afraid the "shore" is not gay enough for us. 
Then John thinks there is a poor crowd at the re- 
sorts this summer; no one worth over a hundred 
and fifty or two hundred thousand. I think likely 
we will go to Santa Monica for tennis. I see "be 
the papers" that you can go every thirty minutes 
from the Arcadia Hotel to the play grounds on 
the local electric cars — for nothing — and that 
counts, or. rather, doesn't count. I don't suppose 
they would really want us to go every thirty min- 
utes. It would probably be just as cheap if we 
went every hour or two. They do say a man came 
into the Arcadia the other day for dinner and when 
he heard you could have it from twelve to two- 
thirty for seventy-five cents or a dollar, I forget 
which, he was afraid he couldn't hold out that 
long. Then he asked the clerk whether he 
couldn't peg away say for half an hour or so for 



two bits. ANN IDLER. 


91 

n 


• « • • Che Paper In this Publication i$ 
"fjalf Cone Book," furnished by • • • • 

Blake, moffitt * Coivne 


ft 
ft 


•* 


• « « « paper Dealers • « « * 


S* 


• Paper • of • all • Descriptions • 


ft 




91 



12 



Oldest and Largest Kailk ill Southern California 

FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) $500,000 SURPLUS and REHERVE 8926,742 
Total 11,426.742 

OFFICERS 

L W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashlei 

Q. HEIMANN Asf istant Cashiei 

DIRECTORS 
W. H. Perry C. E. Thorn A. Glassell 

O. W. Chllds L W. Hellman, Jr. L N.Van Nuys 
J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 



WSpeclal Collection Department. Our safety deposit depart 
ment offers to the public, safes for rent in Its new fire and 
burglar proof vault, which is the strongest, best guarded 
and best lighted in this city. 



W. C. Patterson, President 
M. P. (iBKEN, Vice-Prest. 



W. D. Woolwine, Cashier 

E. W. Coe, Asst. Cashier 



THE LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL 8500,000 SURPLUS and Undivided Profllts, 8100,000 
United States Depositary 



Letters of Credit and Drafts issued available in all parts of 
the world. 

W. F. BOTSFORD, President J. G. MOSSIN, Cashier 

G. W. HUGHES Vice-Pres. T. W. PHELPS, A is' t Cashier 

CALIFORNIA BANK 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



DIRECTORS: 

W. F. Botsford G. W. Hughes 
W. H.Burnham E.W.Jones 
Homer Laughlin I. B. Newton 



R. F. Lotspeicb 
W. S. Newhall 
H. 0. Winner 



Capital Stock $250,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 35,000 

A General Banking Business transacted. 
Special attention given to Collections. 
Exchanges sold on all parts of the world. 



H. J. Wooi.lacott, President 
J. W. A. Off, Cashier 



R. H. HOWBLL, 1st Vice Pres. 
Wakrkn Giu.ki.rn, 2nd V. P. 



STATE BANK & TRUST CO. 

Of Los Angeles. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL HALF MILLION DOLLARS 

DIRECTORS: 



R. II. Howell J. W A. Off 

H. J. Woollacott K. F. Porter 

.1. A. Muir F. K. Rule 
Wm. M. Garland 



C. C. Allen 
A. W. Ryan 
Warren Ulllelen 
L. C. Brand 



A General Banking Business transacted. Interest paid on 
Time Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes for rent 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

MAIN STREET SAVINGS BANK 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts. Temple Block 

< 'A PITA L STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUE ...President 

I N. VAN NITY8 Vice-President 

E. J. VAWTER.JR Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Kasper Conn, H. W. O'Melveny 
L. Winter, O. T. Johnson, T. L. Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. G 
Kerckhoff, A. Haas. 



CHAS. B PIRONI 

Sole Proprietor 



Located at West (Jlendale 
Los Angeles county 



West Glendale Winery and Vineyards 

Producer and Grower of 

High Grade Sweet and Table Wines 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TIME CARD 

Los Angeles and Redondo Ry. 

In Eff-ct June 3, 1900 

Depot: Corner Grand Avenue and Jefferson street 



Trains leave Los Angeles lor Redondo 
DAILY 


Trains leave Redondo for Us Angelas 

DAILY 


8.10 am 


7.00 am 


11.30 am 


10.00 am 


3.30 pm 


1.30 pm 


0.30 pin 


S.OO pm 


*12.ni> Ni-ht 


• ll.Oil pin 



•Wednesdays and Saturdays only. 

Connecting with Grand avenue or Main and Jefferson street 
cars at Los Angeles, city Office: 246 S. Spring st. Tel. M . 1031 

For rates on freight and passengers, apply at depot, corner 
Grand avenue and Jefferson st. Los Angeles Tel. West I. 

See Santa Fe schedule, tickets interchangeable. 

L. J. Pkrry, Superintendent. 

The Pacific Coast Regalia Co. 

f\ . TENNANT G R f\ V 

Manu ot. ct . u . rera Military and Society Goods 



Western Graphic 
SOCIETY IN 

Dejeuner in the 



Flags, Banners, Badges, 
Uniforms and Swords 
Gold and Silver Trimmings 
Bullion Embroideries 



..HO.. 

WEST SECOND STREET 



ejeviner in 

By BEN. C 

PARIS, France, July 7, 1900. 

THIS has been the most exciting week a la 
Americaine that has ever taken place in the 
French capital. Mr. and Mrs. M. H. De 
Young opened the week with a picnic in the big 
trees at Sceaux-Robinson, and when I say In the 
trees I mean way up in the trees — clear up in the 
branches; and every one who participated agreed 
that the breakfast was much the best any one of 
them had had in Paris. A special train conveyed 
Mr. and Mrs. De Young's guests to their destina- 
tion. Several scores of donkeys were in readiness 
at the station, and almost all the young people in 
the party, and riot a few of their elders, mounted 
the comical little beasts and started up the hill to 
the restaurant Vvai Robinson, where dejeuner was 
to be served. The cavalcade, as it mounted the 
ascent, presented a most amusing sight. Several 
of the gentlemen riders, possessed of long legs, 
had in the rush for mounts secured the smallest 
donkeys, and it was difficult to tell whether they 
were riding or walking. 

At Vrai Robinson all the trees had been reserved 
for Mr. and Mrs. De Young's picnic, and in it was 
a very jolly party that mounted the steps and sat 
down to eat high among the leafy branches. After 
dejeuner the guests repaired to the pavilion, where 
a Neapolitan band and a string orchestra fur- 
nished music for dancing, which was kept up with 
great spirit until it was time for the special train 
to leave for Paris. There were 146 people in all, 
comprising Commissioner-General Peck and staff 
and their ladies, many of the National and State 
Commissioners and their ladies and some noted 
Parisians. The next day Mr. and Mrs. De Young 
were "at home" to two hundred callers from 4 
until 7, and their handsome apartment at 15 
avenue d'Antin, formerly occupied by the Land- 
grave of Hesse, was thronged. Some excellent 
music was given during the ai^ernoon by M. Berg, 
on the violin, and Mrs. Hurlbert, on the harp, 
and Mrs. Albertini and Miss Yaw sang several se- 
lections. 

On Tuesday, the 3d, the magnificent bronze 
statue of Washington was unveiled in the pres- 
ence of a large number of Americans. Mrs. .John 
P. Jones of Santa Monica and Mrs. Daniel Man- 
ning of New York conjointly doing the unveiling. 
Sousa made the music and the tops and windows 
of the big houses all round were filled with peo- 
ple who rent the air with acclamations. Ambas- 
sador Porter presided. Consul-General Gowdy 
presented the monument in the name of the Asso- 
ciation of the Women of America to France. The 
Minister of Foreign Affairs, M. Decasse, spoke in 
acceptance of the gift, and Colonel Chaille Long 
delivered the address of the day. 

Ten years ago a group of ladies assembled at 
the capital of the United States for the purpose of 
causing a statute of Washington to be presented 
to France. Their committee has now accom- 
plished the object for which it was founded. At 
this moment the statue stands upon its pedestal 
in the place d'lena, and is the finest equestrian 
statue of Washington I have ever seen. 

Mrs. Stephen J. Field, widow of the Honorable 
Associate .Justice of the Supreme Cpurt, was 
elected by the committee of the Women of Amer- 
ica president of the association, with Mrs. James 
Kerr-Kelly secretary. Mrs. Cleveland, and subse- 
quently Mrs. McKinley, were made honorary presi- 
dents, and Mrs. John P. Jones and one hundred 
other eminent women vice-presidents. 

Mr. Daniel C. French, the American sculptor, 
member of the Aeeademia di San Luca, Rome, 
was selected as the artist. 

The statute is an equestrian figure in bronze of 
heroic size, and Washington is represented at the 
moment of taking command of the Revolutionary 
army at Cambridge on the morning of July 3, 1775, 
The commander-in-chief, with extended arms and 
sword, appeals to Heaven for strength to defend 
the sacred cause of American independence. 

The president of the French republic was pres- 
ent, also the diplomatic corps, French and for- 
eign, the ministers and chiefs of departments, the 
foreign commissioners-general at the exposition, 
the United States Commissioners, the members of 
the Academic and Institut de France, all with 
their wives; the Sons and Daughters of the Revo- 
lution, Colonial Dames, and members of the so- 
ciety in France of the Sons of the American Revo- 
lution, of which General Porter. LL. D., United 
States Ambassador, is the president. 

But the most impassioned and imposing fete of 
the week was the unveiling of the equestrian 
statue of Lafayette on the Fourth of July, at La- 
fayette square in the place du Carrousel, Court of 
the New Louvre, in the presence of many thous- 
ands of people, most of them Americans. There 
were 1400 seats in the tribunes, President Loubet 
being the guest of honor. Sousa was on hand with 
his band; and, among other selections, played one 
composed for the occasion. General Horace Porter 



PARIS 

Tree Tops 



TRUMAN 

presided. The ministry and various departments 
of state were well represented, also the diplo- 
matic corps, the commissioners at the exposition, 
the United States embassy and consulate, commit- 
tees of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, Sotis of the American Revolution, Daughters 
of the Revolution, Sons of the Revolution, repre- 
sentatives of education of the United States, 
United States senators and congressmen. The 
monument was presented to France on behalf of 
the children of the United States and the Lafay- 
ette Memorial Commission by Commissioner-Gen- 
eral Peck, who is honorary president of the 
Monument Commission, and was received for the 
French republic by President Loubet. It was un- 
veiled by two young boys, representing the school 
children of France and America. Masters Gustave 
Hennocque and Haul Thompson, the one the great 
grandson of Lafayette, the other the son of Mr. 
Robert J. Thompson, projector of the monument. 
Just as these two boys drew the veiling from the 
statue Miss Georgie Truman of Los Angeles 
stepped from one of the tribunes, and, walking to 
the front of the monument, placed thereon a huge 
laurel wreath tied with satin ribbon of the colors 
of both republics, after which she turned and 
bowed to President Loubet amidst tremendous 
cheering. Then Sousa struck up his new piece 
and the great mass arose to a person. A dedica- 
tory ode written by Mr. Frank Putnam of Chicago 
was read by Miss Tarquinia L. Voss, representative 
of the Daughters of the Revolution, and the dedi- 
catory address was delivered by Archbishop Ire- 
land, who came all the way from St. Paul for the 
purpose. 

The Daughters of the American Revolution, who 
have placed a tablet on the monument, were repre- 
sented by Mrs. Daniel Manning, who made an ad- 
dress on "Lafayette and the Daughters of the 
American Revolution." 

But the speech of the day was that made by 
Hon. Robert J. Thompson, Secretary of the La- 
fayette Memorial Commission, his subject being 
the "School Youth of the United States and the 
Lafayette Monument." It was masterly and ele- 
gant throughout, and was delivered in an impres- 
sive way, after which Sousa played the Marsel- 
laise and Star-Spangled Banner. 

Among those offlcialy present were William 
Mitchell Bunker, President of the California Soci- 
ety of Sons of the American Revolution, who, hav- 
ing traveled to Paris by way of Honolulu, Japan. 
China and Siberia, undoubtedly enjoys the distinc- 
tion of being the long-distance delegate. The Cal- 
ifornia society is the parent organization of the 
Sons of the American Revolution, and apparently 
enjoys an international reputation for progress and 
patriotism. Colonel Hubbard, Colonel Currier, 
Hon. Horace Davis, and other prominent San 
Franciscans identified with the G. A. R. may rest 
assured their splendid efforts in the line of patri- 
otic endeavor have not been in vain. The Cali- 
fornia Society stands well in the lead, and the 
speeches at its banquets have made a dent in 
Europe. 

jt ,< j| 

Your readers will not fail to notice one thing 
in connection with the unveiling of these two mon- 
uments — that Los Angeles county was conspicu- 
ously represented 

The same afternoon Ambassador Porter gave a 
brilliant reception to all Americans in Paris, and 
Sousa's band was present. 

In the evening the American Chamber of Com- 
merce had their annual banquet at the Continental 
Hotel and again Sousa furnished the music. 

At 10 o'clock Sousa opened on the Place d 'Opera 
in front of the California Paris Commission head- 
quarters to an audience of 40,000 people. This con- 
cert lasted until an hour after midnight. The 
commission rooms were brilliantly illuminated 
and handsomely decorated, as was the entire 
building throughout. 

There were no firecrackers or pyrotechnics, and 
no booming of cannon; no spoiled eyes, no frac- 
tured arms or hands; and no heads. But it was a 
most enjoyable Fourth. 

On Thursday afternoon Mrs. Daniel Manning 
gave a brilliant tea at the Elysee Hotel, and in the 
evening Mrs. Potter Palmer, United States Commis- 
sioner, had an elegant reception at the same hotel. 
E. W. Runyon gave a breakfast at the Cafe Paris 
to Commissioner-General Peck and fourteen 
others, and in the evening the Commissioner-Gen- 
eral gave a banquet in honor of the California 
commissioners and the forty American jurors. 

I shall never forget the Fourth of July week of 
1900 in Paris. 

BEN C. TRUMAN. 



Oh. youth! from evil turn away, 
And trusting man beware! 

That water mixed with whisky's a 
Dilution and a snare. 



Western Graphic 
T5he Country ourvd 

^ Notes on the Progress of Ovjr Country ^ ^ ^ 



IN Fountain Valley, Orange county, one for- 
tunate rancher has a crop of potatoes which 
will net him in the neighborhood of $200 
per acre. 

J* ,* 

The proprietors of a hotel at Williams, Arizona, 
discovered, while sinking a well, a mine which 
contained both gold and copper ore. In all prob- 
ability there are thousands of opportunities to find 
mineral wealth in this section where there is one 
in Alaska. 

j* j* 

A mine of the best lithographic stone has been 
discovered in Santa Barbara county. 

^8 

The orange and lemon growers have had an 
inning this year. Both early and late oranges 
have been profitable. The crop was large and 
prices satisfactory. 

tij8 

The fish stories which come over from Avalon 
are enough to make old Izaak Walton, author of 
"The Complete Angler," wish for a reincarnation. 

The curious incident of the sinking of a steam- 
er last Sunday by the collision with a big whale 
will add a new horror of the sea to nervous peo- 
ple. The whale is very much in evidence on the 
Pacific Coast. Rarely a voyage is made when the 
spouters do not "show up." 

The census of Mexico has recently been com- 
pleted and shows a population of about twelve and 
a half millions. The census also shows that only 
one third of this population can read and write. 
It is no wonder the Bryan dollar flourishes in Mex- 
ico. 

Red Bluff, Tehama county, in the Sacramento 
Valley, had a temperature of 110 degrees in the 
shade last Saturday. Fresno has had a maximum 
temperature of 106 for ten davs the present month. 
& & 

The Belgian hare industry in Los Angeles was 
given a long article in a recent issue of the Scien- 
tific American. The writer took the ground that 
the business is likely to be always a paying one. 

Los Angeles municipal taxes are likely to reach 
$1,000,000 this year. New York raises, by direct 
taxation, $82,000,000; London, $73,000,000: Paris, 
$75,000,000; Boston, $36,000,000; Chicago, $32,000,- 
000; Philadelphia, $27,000,000. 

ti£ t$ 

Meat to be higher in price is the news which 
comes from the stock growing centers of the coun- 
try. The past three years many thousand acres of 
alfalfa have been added to Southern California pas- 
turage. This pasturage can be turned to good 
account now. Good beef cattle, hogs and poultry 
will pay as well or better than any other agricul- 
tural investments, at least, for several years to 
come. 

A temperature of 106 degrees was reported a 
week ago in New York, and it was almost as bad 
in the other great cities. The amount of distress 
these hot days occasion in the great cities can 
hardly be realized. The morgues are filled with 
sun-stricken dead. In the New York morgue, on 
the day mentioned, there were forty young chil- 
dren, victims of the heat, on the slabs. 

ti?8 *j5^ 

Last Friday and Saturday heavy rains fell in 
the mountains near Los Angeles and in some parts 
of San Bernardino and Riverside counties. The 
water supply is increased by these rains and much 
good done. A long drouth in Arizona has been 
broken by ample rains. 

^ Jt J* 

The agent for the Mt. Lowe railroad states that 
one day last week one hundred persons were taken 
over the line — nearly all Eastern tourists spend- 
ing the summer here. As the California summer, 
near the coast, becomes better understood more 
and more tourists will find their way here to spend 
June, July and August. The city itself is generally 
cooler in summer than most beach resorts on the 
Atlantic coast, but a perfect temperature can al- 
ways be obtained at the seaside and mountains. 
„* -J* ■!* 

The national government is after people who 
leave camp fires burning. It is rather hard to en- 
tirely extinguish a camp fire in the absence of 
plenty of water. Even when there is no malicious 
intent the law makes it possible for a judge to im- 
pose a fine of $1000 and imprisonment in jail for 
a year on the unlucky individuals who leave smoul- 
dering embers where they might cause a conflagra- 
tion. Cheap chemical fluids can be obtained which 
will quickly and surely leave no possibility of a 
fire's breaking out after the camp is left. 

The extension of Lake Shore avenue to Tropico 
is planned. Now that the new tile factory is as- 
sured the improvement will be needed. It is prob- 
able that the country in the vicinity of Tropico 
will be solidly built up within the next five years, 
and commuication with the business center of 



Los Angeles should be made as convenient as pos- 
sible. < jl 

A company is completing arrangements to bring 
electric power from Kern river to Los Angeles. It 
surely is not the fault of capital if there is not 
hereafter power enough to serve the manufacturers 
of Los Angeles. Cheap power is assured from the 
harnessing of numerous water falls, and the abun- 
dance of oil for fuel purposes. Kern river is a 
goodly stream to look on the greater part of the 
year. Unlike many Southern California rivers it 
does not run bottom side up. When the snows 
melt it has expansive theories of its own which 
might shock the followers of W. J. Bryan. 

i$ 

The cable dispatches bring most doleful accounts 
of the extreme summer heat in England a few days 
ago. The London hospitals were said to be literally 
filled with sun-struck patients. Even more territble 
to the conservative Britain is the fact that he has 
been obliged to abandon his conventional silk 
hat for the plebian straw hat. The dispatches 
emphasize this phase of the situation. At first 
the unthinking American might be inclined to 
gibe at his British cousin for his sensitiveness on 
the subject of head covering. It must be remem- 
bered, however, that England, more than any 
country, except India, is divided into classes and 
the caste is dominant. As Shakespeare put it: 
"The apparel doth proclaim the man." 

(j^8 

Dr. George Barnes, formerly of Cleveland, Ohio, 
a retired phyiscian, removed to Los Angeles coun- 
ty nearly seven years ago and bought a beautiful 
home near the foothills. The doctor, now in his 
eighty-fifth year, is an enthusiast concerning 
Southern California and declares that the outdoor 
life it has been possible to lead here, has made 
a new man of him. He asserts that he feels young- 
er now than he did fifty years ago. The past year 
he has been making a collection of quotations from 
the world's famous poets. He quaintly and hu- 
morously says he believes the writers had some 
occult knowledge of Southern California, and he 
has collected nearly two hundred quotations which 
seem to fully describe conditions here. The fol- 
lowing are a few of his quotations, taken at ran- 
dom: 

In Pope's translation of Homer these lines 
occur: 

"Stern winter smiles on that auspicious clime; 
The fields are florid with unfading prime." 

J* v* 

This is John Milton's quote: 

"Each tree, 

Loaded with fairest fruit that hung to the eye, 
Tempting stirred in me sudden appetite 
To pluck and eat." 

d£ 

Shakespeare's contribution to the Southern Cali- 
fornia Album reads as follows: 

"Hourly joys be still upon you! 
Juno sings her blessings on you. 
Vines and clustering bunches growing. 
Plants with goodly burthen bowing; 
Spring come to you at the, farthest 
In the very end of harvest! 
Scarcely and want, shall shun you." 
Ceres' blessing so is on you." 

& Jl Jt 

Ireland's poet, Thomas Moore, contributes this: 
"Beneath some orange trees, 
Whose fruit and blossoms in the breeze 
Were wantoningly together free 
Like age at plav with infancy." 

:< .# 

From James Thompson, a noted English poet: 
"Bear me, Pomona, to thy citrus grove. 
To where the lemon and the piercing lime, 
With the deep orange glowing through the green 
Their lighter glories blend." 

Jl 

From Richard Crashaw, another English poet: 
"But here the roses blush so rare. 
Here the mornings smile so fair, 
As if neither cloud nor wind 
But would be courteous, would be kind." 
jl jl 
From St. Augustine: 

"There the ever-blooming roses 
Everlasting spring bestow; 
There the snow-white lilacs glisten 
With the saffrons ruddv glow." 
* .< Jl 
From James Russell Lowell: 

"Here men shall grow up. 
Strong from self-helping; 
Eyes for the present 
Bring they as eagles. 
They shall make over 
Creed, law and custom; 
Drawing men doughty, 
Builders of empire, 
Builders of men." 

jl 4 t 

The freedom of the Pacific Coast from the cy- 
clones and tornadoes which occur east of the 
Rocky Mountains is a blessing hardly appreciated 
by residents here. The cyclone is a frequent visl- 



13 



tor in all the Middle Western States, and rarely 
a week passes when some victims are not claimed. 
Every year hundreds of families who have toiled 
and labored to secure a competency find their all 
swept away by these terrible visitations. Far worse 
to consider is the host of killed and mangled vic- 
tims of the cyclones. All of the Central States 
have in their hospitals human wrecks doomed to 
lives of hopeless misery. Some have lost arms, 
legs or eye sight. Others have sustained spinal 
injuries and lie paralyzed, in many cases bearing 
with patience constant agony. The records appear 
to show that cyclonic disturbances are increasing. 
When they occur in cities, as was the case in East 
St. Louis a few years ago, no pen can adequately 
describe the scene. In that instance the streets 
were literally crowded with the dead and dying. 
The following quotation from the July Century 
is a vivid and realistic description of a cyclone in 
Southern Kanass: 

"It had been a warm day. even for August. Now, 
however, the air had in it the baking quality of 
fire. There was something wierd and dreamlike 
about it that made him afraid. 

"Through a deepening unearthly gloom he 
stumbled to the open road to the west. Then he 
knew. Above the far horizon there was a band of 
writhing copper; above that, sweeping like a tidal 
wave across the sky, was a boiling sea of black- 
ness. From this, inky and terrible against the cop- 
per there extended to the earth a mighty, twisting 
resistless column of midnight — the cyclone! 

"One glance convinced him that its course lay 
through the southern outskirts of the city and 
directly towards him. His only safety lay in 
fleeing across its path. As he raced northward, he 
realized there was a humming sound in the air, 
and that it grew louder. Then almost immediately 
it became as the roar of a thousand Niagaras. In 
the blackness he felt his foot touch planking. He 
remembered a small bridge there, and plunged over 
it to a ravine and the shallow water below. An 
instant later leaves, brush, singles, rails — the whole 
medleyed gleaning of the wind — lay upon him. 

It became still. Dazed and half choked he 
dragged himself to daylight and air. He was un- 
hurt: the narrow ditch had saved him. It was no 
longer dark, and a downpour of rain had set in. 
Where the cyclone had passed there was an open 
way. Not a tree, not a fence, not a house had 
been left standing. Crowds had already gathered 
about the wrecks of the houses when he arrived. 
A woman and two children had been killed. Many 
had broken limbs and bruises and were provided 
with medical attendance. 

"Through the cyclone stricken belt it seemed as 
if some mighty fiend with a hatred for whatever 
was green and of the earth had paused here for 
a moment's sport. The work of six years was 
all gone." HERBERT. 



In the 
World 



Strongest 

THE EQUITABLE 
LIFE INSURANCE 

COMPANY Of New York 

It gives protection that protects l not for a 
day. but for all time) with a 

Surplus of over #61,000,000 

The largest held by any company on earth. 
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Dividends are Paid 

More than 

One Million Dollars 

A mouth was paid to our policy holders in 
I8!>!>, and almost as much in 

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This great financial institution issues ."> 
per cent 

Guarantee Income Bonds 

Which may be paid for on the installment ^ 
plan. Send in your date of birth, on 
receipt of which we will mail pamphlet 
giving full diseription. 



A. M. SHIELDS, - - MANAGER 
W. H. CKAMHR - - CASHIER 



SOUTCTBS QAXiXFOBULA Dki'A ktmknt 

414-416-418-420 Wilcox Building 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

liiiiAiAiAiAiAiAi^iAiAiAiAii 



14 



Western Graphic 



Among the Mvimmers 

In the Eyes qf the Critic- -Coming Events 



THE Orpheum gives us a typical vaudeville 
bill of fare this week, comprising a comedy 
by four people, an impersonator of negro charac- 
ters, an operatic and ballad vocalist, a novelty 
musical act, and a comedy male quartet. As dur- 
ing last week the piece de resistance is the farce- 
comedy presented by the four Cohans, and al- 
though they have titilated us with the ingenious 
fun of "Running for Office" at a previous visit, the 
farce was as refreshing as Manager Bronson's ice 
fans, which is saying a good deal these warm even- 
ings. The eccentric fooling of George Cohan is 
perhaps the most original and convulsing of any- 
thing on the American stage. His ability to keep 
a straight face through all his nonsense is not 
shared by his mother, who during the course of 
the play, on several evenings was obliged to stop 
and control her risibilities, aroused by the antics of 
the young man. Miss Cohan is altogether a grace- 
ful and fascinating girl. She possesses the very 
perfection of a pucker to her mouth and dances 
with the suppleness and abandon of a coryphee. 
The story of "Running for Office" concerns a 
widow and widower who have married and who 
are each deceiving the other that they are parent 
of a grown boy and girl, respectively. The young 
people being engaged and unaware of the mar- 
riage of their parents, and by chance meeting at 
the parental home, gives rise to amusing complica- 
tions. The ingenuity of the misapprehensions is 
bewildering and one cannot but think that young 
Cohan must have several sets of clock works in his 
head to evolve such a tangle. But the thing is 
straightened out in half a minute and the piece 
closes with a whirl of song and dance, in which 
George Cohan all but disarticulates every joint in 
his body. 

Stella May hew is a buxon woman, who dares 
the disfiguring black cork for the sake of adding 
realism to her clever negro characterizations. The 
real woman shows itself, though, when apparently 
unpremeditated she rolls her sleeves up to show a 
white, round arm above the limits of the makeup. 
The real merit of her work is that it more nearly 
approaches the real, southern negro singing than 
the majority of such acts. 

Smith and Fuller are the real thing of what 
Musical Dale imitated last week, or else they have 
greatly improved upon the instruments used by 
the later. The bamboo bells of this week's team 
are of especially pleasing tone, and they introduce 
several entirely new instruments, upon which they 
perform with precision and harmonious ability. 

Mrs. Blitz-Paxton. I understand, is a society lady 
from the northern part of the State, who through 
misfortune and the responsibilities of a family, has 
been obliged to seek the gold of the vaudeville 
theaters. Her voice is pure and sympathetic, and 
when she shall have overcome the nervousness of 
inexperience, will undoubtedly improve. She was 
nicely received and can feel assured that her sin- 
cere work will everywhere be appreciated. 

The Quaker City Quartette are black face war- 
blers and instrumentalists who use a barber shop 
stage setting. It is not true to life, from the fact 
that there are many barber shops where better 
talent is going to waste. It is a clear case that 
they would be more satisfactory in the exciting 
sport of chasing hairs off men's faces. 

Barrere and Jules have a combination horizontal 
and parallel bars with some original stunts to 
match the aparatus. Being on the end of the bill 
many of the best points in their turn are lost to the 
majority of the audience through the haste of cer- 
tain ill-mannered persons to get out of the house. 
The only reasons that can be ascribed for the rude- 
ness of those who rush out before the final curtain, 
are that they want the rest of the people to know 
they have been there, desire to give the impres- 
sion of being bored, or are afraid that everything 
liquid in the city will be consumed before they can 
reach it. 

■ t JC •« 
Orpheum 

One of the biggest hits scored at the San Fran- 
cisco Orpheum this year is that of Clayton White 
and Maria Stuart, who closed an engagement there 
last week. They were retained two weeks longer 
than their original engagement called for. They 
are English entertainers, character impersonators, 
singers, dancers and are considered the best of 
their sort that ever came across the pond. They 
begin a season at the Orpheum here next week 
as the stars of the new bill. 

Williamson and Stone, who are black face come- 
dians, will supply a long felt want. There have 
not been any black face fellows hereabouts for 
some time. 

Donohue and Nichols will have a prominent place 
on the new bill. This is their first visit to the 
coast. They are sketch performers. 

The Quaker City Quartette will sing and play 
new music. Barrere and Jules, the French acro- 
bats, will be retained another week, as will also 
Mrs. Blitz-Paxton, the society singer; Stella May- 
hew, the negro mammy impersonator: Smith and 
Fuller, players of musical instruments. 



Morosco's 

Tomorrow evening at the Burbank Theater, the 
Neill Company, direct from Honolulu, will begin 
a limited engagement, presenting for the first time 
in this city at popular prices Madeline Lucette 
Ryley's brilliant comedy, 'An American Citizen." 
Mr. Neill presented this piece at the California 
Theater, San Francisco, and the press speak in the 
highest terms of the play and players, and also the 
careful attention paid to detail. "An American 
Citizen" is one of the cleverest comedies written, 
and was originally presented on the Coast by Nat 
Goodwin, who attained remarkable success with it. 
Mr. Neill is said to appear to better advantage in 
"An American Citizen" than in anything that re- 
markably versatile actors appears. 

"An American Citizen" is in four acts, the first 
taking place in New York, the second and third 
in Nice, and the last at London. When the cur- 
tain rises on the law office of Barbury, Brown & 
Cruger in New York, the audience learns that Ed- 
gerton Brown, the second partner, has apparently 
committed suicide while at sea, and that his sui- 
cide has laid bare a defalcation amounting to a 
large sum. Beresford Cruger determines to save 
the firm by repaying the money. The appearance 
of Sir Humphrey Bunn gives him the opportunity 
of doing this by reconsidering his refusal to bene- 
fit under the will of an uncle, ham'pered by the 
condition that he should renounce his nationality, 
take the name of Carew, and not share his rich in- 
heritance with his English cousin, Beatrice Carew, 
the testator's daughter, who has been disinherited 
by her father for refusing to stop accepting the at- 
tentions of a young American. The arrival of 
Beatrice shows him a way out of his difficulty. By 
going through the form of marriage with her he 
can share the estate with, not his "cousin." but his 
"wife," Beatrice Carew, and with the balance of the 
fortune he can make good his partner's delin- 
quencies. The queer position established between 
the two forms the basis of the comedy. 

At the time of her marriage, Beatrice is in love 
with Edgerton Brown, who, on learning that she 
has been disinherited by her father, has slipped 
out of his engagement by forwarding her notices 
describing his death on an Alpine glacier. She, 
therefore, takes only a passing interest in Carew, 
who. on his side, has fallen deeply in love with his 
handsome bride.' The action of the comedy shows 
how Brown returns again, how he is finally dis- 
comfited by Carew, and Beatrice after many mis- 
understandings admits her love for her husband 
and joins him in his lonely London dwelling. Here 
in a old-fashioned interior Carew is spending a 
melancholy Christmas eve with Mercury, his office 
boy, but Beatrice with all her apparent coldness 
melted by love and pity joins him at the humble 
supper table, and as the Christmas carols are sung 
outside the audience recognizes that the happiness 
of the lovers is complete. 

"An American Citizen" will run only one week 
with the regular matinee on Saturday. 

& £ £ 

Cues for the Public 

ANGELENOS may felicitate themselves upon 
being good judges of theatricals. During 
the Neill engagement in this city, the 
Neills gained a strong hold upon the good opinions 
of Burbank patrons, and after an equally good im- 
pression in San Francisco they went to Honolulu 
where they played to phenomenal business. The 
expense of attending a high-class theatrical enter- 
tainment in Honolulu is very great. During the 
Neill engagement there at the Hawaiian Opera 
House, the price of the tickets were $1.50 and $2 
each. As every play patron rides in hacks to and 
from the theater, and the hack rates double after 
eleven o'clock at night, every time that a young 
man would take a lady to a performance it would 
cost him for two persons about $10, yet the finan- 
cial receipts of the Neill Company's engagement 
exceeded the first two weeks $10,000. The farewell 
performances were jammed and crowded all of the 
time, some patrons coming from as far as Hilo, 
ever 200 miles by water, and plantation officials 
deserted their fields for the play. The organization 
will return to Honolulu a year from August under 
a guarantee of $20,000 for five weeks. Early next 
summer Chas. Astor Parker, manager of the Neill 
Company, will go in advance of the Neill company 
on its tour of Australia and the Orient. 
Jt ■< 

Jessie Padgham opened at the Orpheum in San 
Francisco this week, and it will be pleasing to her 
many friends here to learn that she "made good" 
beyond all expectations. The San Francisco press 
said many nice things about her. 

Jt Jit 4* 

It will be another month before the Los Angeles 
Theater opens for the season. 

Adolph Zink, the liliputian comedian, who is to 
play the opposite role to Jerome Sykes in "Foxy 
Quiller," is fond of attending glove contests. He 
considers himself quite an expert in "the manly 



art." He saw a recent fight at the Broadway Ath- 
letic club. After it was over he stood on a chair giv- 
ing his opinion of the pugulists. Some one remark- 
ed that he knew nothing about fighting — that either 
of the Rossow midgets could best him. "I can 
thrash 'em both with one tied behind my back," 
roared the 36-inch laugh-maker. "Ach! They're 
too small for a man of my size." 

Liebler & Co. lately made overtures to a promi- 
nent English actor to appear in "The Choir Invisi- 
ble," in support of Henry Jewett at the Park Thea- 
ter, Boston, beginning October 1. The actor called 
on Mr. Jewett and was agreeable as to part and 
salary, but stipulated that he should be permitted 
to introduce three songs and an anthem in the 
church scene. "My dear fellow," said Mr. Jewett 
blandly, "You have made a slight mistake. This 
is 'The Choir IN-visible,' not a dramatization of 
'The Girl with the Auburn Hair'." The engagement 
was called off. 

jH :* :< 

Klaw & Erlanger have secured Delia Fox. Last 
Tuesday she signed a contract with them to play 
under their direction for a term of years. During 
the coming season she will appear as "Belle Money, 
a sprightly young girl," with the Klaw & Erlanger 
Comedy Company in "The Rogers Brothers in 
Central Park." John J. McNally will write a part 
expressly for her in this humorous vaudeville skit. 
The season of 1901-2 Klaw & Erlanger will place 
Miss Fox at the head of her own company in a 
play which will be written for her. Miss Fox has 
entirely recovered from her recent very severe ill- 
ness and her friends and admirers will undoubted- 
ly be pleased to learn that she has so speedily se- 
cured such a fine engagement with flattering pros- 
pects for the following years. 

MAIN STREET ' 
BET. FIRST 
AND SECOND 
Los Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing Honday, July 30 

Clayton WUta and Marie Stuart, in the society playlet, 

"The Waldorf-Metropole Episode" 
W i 1 1 i mi .nil & Stone, Black-fare Comedians 
John Donahue and Slattie Nickola, Acrobatic Comedians 
Smith and Fuller, Far-famed Musical Artists 
Barrere and Jules, Parallel and Horizontal Bar performers 
Mrs. Klitz-I'axton, Society Vocalist 
Stella Mayhew, Clever siDger of Coon 8ongs 
(tusker City Quartette, in Fun in a Barber Shop 

PRICES never changing— 25c and 50c: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part, of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 




M 



OROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER 

Oliver Morosco, 1 essee and Manager 
WILL RE-OPEN TOMORROW NIGHT 
Limited engagement of 

flR. JAMES NEILL 

AND THE INCOMPARABLK 

NEILL COMPANY 

Presenting Nat C. Goodwin's greatest success 

"An American Citizen" 

All the old favorites in the cast. Lavish scenic 
mountings. Seats now selling. Prices 15, 25, 35, 50c. 



Imperial Co " n c d er, c " e a " 



Family Restaurant' 
and Oyster Parlors^ 

243 S. SPRING STREET «n<l 

Phone IOI 242 s. sroadwav... 

Grand Concerts daily from 12 noon to 1.30 p. m. 

6 to 7 and S to 12 evenings. Orchestra under direction X 

of P. J. Franks, late of Chicago. Everything first-class. X 

Theater Parties a Specialty 3 

HAI.MER & PUTZMAN. Managers. ^ 



George Zobelein j» 
Vlce-Pres. and Sec'y gi 

HOME INDUSTRY KEEP MONEY AT HOME 



Joseph Maier, 

Pres. and Treas. 



MAIER & ZOBELEIN 




BREWERY... 



TEL. M. 91. 



ncorporated 

444 ALISO STREET 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Western Graphic 



15 




Continued from 



fag* 



Cool and 

Pleasant 
Always 



AT 



HOTEL REDONDO 

JOS. H. BOHON, Manager 

"fanned by Ocean Breezes" 




terminal 
Island 

Cong 
Beach 

Catalina 
Island 



No better places for Ska Bathing, Fishing 
Yachting and Boatotg on the Pacific 
Coast. Fine hotels, good boarding- houses, 
Elegant camp grounds and pure water. 
Agents of the 

Los Angeles Terminal Railway 

Will sell you tickets and furnish all desired 
information. 

Excursion Rates Frequent Trains 

City Ticket Office, ~>:<7 So. Spring St.. Los Angeles 
F. K. Rule, Gen. Mgr. T. C Peck, Gen. Pass Aist. 

I pREE CAMP GROUND 

With Pure Mountain Water 
T — at Avalon — 

Santa Catalina 



Island 



Under conditions prevailing last year. Dozens 
of swift power launches for fishing and excur- 
sions. Tuna Club tournament now on. Free 
concerts by our famous band of 20 soloists. 
The best golf links. The aquarium, containing 
hundreds of living wonders of the deep. Boat- 
ing and bathing over Nature's most wonderful 
marine gardens, as seen at great depth through 
smooth transparent waters, with the many 
other natural advantages, permits Catalina to 
offer attractions for season of 1900 not possible 
at other resorts. Daily steamer service, Her- 
mosa running Saturdays and Sundays. Hotel 
Metropole always open. Take Southern Pa- 
cific cr Terminal Ry. trains, leaving L. A. 
daily at 9:05 and 8:50 a. m., respectively. Fare 
round trip from Los Angeles, excursion $2 50; 
regular $2.75. 

222 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Telephone Main 36 



BANNING CO. 



Hammam Turkish 

Russian or R ^ 5Q 



210 South Broadway 
Los Angeles.... 

Tel. Green 427 



Open Day 
and Night 



haaced in beauty by broad white satin ribbons. 
Those invited to enjoy the dainty repast were 
Mines Win. Piidham, I.. ('. Easton. G. G. Mullins, 
W. E. Dunn, L. T. Garnsey. Edgar Scl1all.1t. F. II. 
Seymour. Margaret Hobbs, M. L. Moon, S. K. Lind- 
ley nnd E. F. C. Klokke. 

Redondo can now boast of a handsome pavilion. 
Wednesday evening the formal opening occurred, 
and after the speeches and musical selections, 
dancing was indulged in. The guests of the hotel 
and the cottage residents took advantage of the 
occasion and enjoyed a very delightful hour on a 
good floor with excellent music. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Seymour presided over a 
charming dinner Thursday evening at their home. 
The floral decorations were very pretty conceived 
and a most enjoyable evening was passed. Those 
at the hospitable board were, besides the host and 
hostess. Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Ainsworth. Mr. and 
Mrs. W. G. Nevin and Miss Seymour. 

Miss Ella Clark who has recently returned from 
an trip in Europe was the guest Thursday of the 
Misses Clark at the hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. McGowan and children came down 
for a few days last week to enjoy a rest. 

Fred H. Swan of Pasadena spent the day last 
week with his parents at Hotel Redondo. 

Mr. Frank Burnett, Mr. Nat Wilshire. Mr. Dick 
Blaisdell and Mr. M. L. Graff were down last Sun- 
day for a round or two of golf. 

Mrs. H. G. Wigmore and daughter spent Thurs- 
day with friends at Hotel Redondo. 

Mrs. Lucia Burnett and daughter were the guests 
of Mrs. Burnett's brother, Douglas Burnett, Sun- 
day. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Bishop escaped the heat in 
the city last Sunday and came to Redondo for a 
refreshing cool breeze. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Clark, who are sojourn- 
ing at the hotel, were among the following who 
formed a pleasant lunch party at the hotel one 
day last week: Mrs. A. J. Howard, Mrs. J. J. 
Melius. Mrs. J. B. Banning, the Misses Nellie and 
Inez Clark, Miss Howard, Miss Horn, Miss Kath- 
erine Melius and Miss Melius. 

Capt. .1. J. Meyler, U. S. A., Mrs. Meyler and 
Robert Meyler, have taken up their abode at the 
hotel for the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Van Dyke and family have 
apartments at the hotel for a number of weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norris Albee were among other 
guests at the hotel last. week. 

Miss Hazel Hallett is the guest of Miss Gertrude 
Sargent at her pretty cottage on the bluff. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Ainsworth entertained last 
Saturday evening with a dinner in honor of Miss 
Evelyn Gwynne and Mr. Carroll Allen, whose mar- 
riage will occur in October. 

A large attendance is expected for the dance at 
the hotel this evening. 

** JH 

AYAI.ON. — Never before in the history of 
Santa Catalina as a place of resort have 
there been so many fair women and such 
bevies of blushing beauties among the younger 
members of the fair sex as are now congregated 
here. California has wrested the palm from other 
States in the line of many of her products, and 
looking over the crowds which assemble at the 
pavilion nightly to tread the merry mazes of the 
dance, we claim for her the handsomest lot of 
women on earth. 

A local golf tournament was held last Saturday 
on the Santa Catalina links, which developed some 
good players among the numerous visitors. There 
were twelve entries, and the match was won by 
E. N. Hillegos of the Rubidoux Club, Riverside, 
with a net score of 88 for the eighteen holes, hav- 
ing a handicap of eight; R. E. Smith, second, with 
a similar handicap, scoring 91. 

Two San Francisco yachts, the Aggie and Tra- 
montana, anchored in the bay, add much to the gay 
appearance of our marine fleet. Commodore E. A. 
Wiltsee of the Aggie has as his guests, W. R. 
Whittier and W. N. Wilson. Vice-Commodore H. 
R. Simpkins. of the Tramontana, has as his guests 
Messrs. Charles Fornald and J. P. Redington of 
Santa Barbara. 

At last, an arrangement has been entered into 
by which the surplus food fishes caught by the 
summer visitors at Avalon are being shipped to 
charitable institutions in Los Angeles. Fred Virg- 
sted, superintendent of the Good Samaritan Mis- 
sion, has started the good work, and is sending 
over daily shipments of as much as he thinks can 
be profitably used. The fish are shipped to the 
Mission, and if there are more than are required 
for that institution, they are delivered to the or- 
phans' homes or charity hospitals. The Wilming- 
ton Transportation Company and the Terminal 
railroad carry the fish free of charge. 

One of the most popular institutions of Avalon 
these warm summer days is (he Japanese lea gar- 
den, an oriental creation in the court of Hotel 
Metropole, where the elite repair to sip refresh- 
ing draughts of cooling drinks. 

Col. Dan Burns and family, his brother-in-law, 
George 1). Gale, and family, with a party of a 
dozen San Francisco friends, are having a gay 
season at Hotel Metropole. Guy B. Barham also 
allows the light of his benign countenance to de- 
scend in x-ray rifts occasionally upon the party. 

Mrs. Hancock Banning has just been entertaining 
at her hospitable summer cottage in Descanso can- 
yon a pleasant house party composed of Mr. and 



Mrs. Randolph H. Miner. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. .1. 
Denis, and R. B. Huie of San Francisco. 

Jl Jl J| 

""TERMINAL ISLAND.— The Terminal Railway 
I has arranged for one of the most attractive 
events of the season to take place at Termi- 
nal Island tomorrow (July 29)— a power-yacht race. 
Some of the best know yachts on the Pacific Coast 
will contest for handsome silver cups to be given 
by the Terminal Island Boat Club. The race will 
take place in the afternoon, the course lying be- 
tween Terminal wharf and Gordon Arms wharf, 
four round trips, thus keeping the racers in full 
view of the spectators at all times, which will make 
it most interesting and exciting. There will be 
some half dozen contestants. The silver cups which 
are to be given as prizes are now on exhibition in 
the window of Montgomery Bros, on South Spring 
street. jl jl 

HOTEL DEL MONTE.— The attention of all 
the society sports — if such a term may be 
used — of the State will be drawn to beauti- 
ful Del Monte during the middle of August, when, 
from the 13th to the 20th will occur the golf tour- 
nament, pony races and polo matches, under the 
auspices of the Pacific Coast Polo and Pony Racing 
Association. The program is as follows: 

August 13. — Golf — Ladies' Handicap for the Hen- 
ry T. Scott cup. Eighteen holes to be played to 
qualify for handicap. August 14 — Ladies' final com. 
petition for the Henry T. Scott cup. Eighteen holes, 
match play. August 15 — Men's Contest for the Del 
Monte cup. Qualifying round of eighteen holes, 
medal play. The sixteen lowest scores to be eligible 
for final competition. August lfith and 17th — 
[Eighteen holes, match play. Final, thirty-six 
holes. August 13, 14, 15, 16 — Polo Tournaments. 
August 17-18 — Pony Racing and Steeplechasing. Au- 
gust 18 — Baseball, Burlingame vs. Alumni of Uni- 
versities. Polo Playing and Golf will continue 
during the next week. 

During the week Bennett's fine concert band 
will give a series of concerts, with a sacred pro- 
gram Sunday evening. The big hotel will be in 
gala attire for the crowds of fashionables who will 
be in attendance, and the expectancy with which 
the knowing ones look forward to the event is 
encouragement enough for all others who have not 
experienced the delights of a visit to inimitable and 
far-famed Hotel Del Monte. 

PHYSICIANS AND Sl'KGKONR 



TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 

306 308 WILCOX BUILDINU 
Res. Tel., White 6011 



Hours— 10-12 am. 
2-4 p.m. 
Office Tel., Main 179 
Residknxe: 919 S. t'NION AVE 



D. CAVE 

LANKERSHIM block 
126 West Third Street 



Tel. Main 1515 



FLYER TO 

CAMP 
CORONADO 

Commencing on Sunday, July 29th, 
a special train every day carrying 
only passengers for Camp Coronado. 
will leave Loa Angeles 7.0. r > a. in., ar- 
riving San Diego lo.-I." a. m. 

Returning at 5.X0 p. m. from San 
Diego, arriving I.os Angeles s t."> p. in. 

Connecting special from Kedlands, 
San Bernardino and Riverside. 

No passengers lor San Diego or other 
places than Camp Coronado will be 
carried on this Special. 

ROUND TRIP $4.00 

Santa Fe Ticket Office 

Second and Spring Sts. 



Kiirekn Harness Oil Is the best 
preservative of new leather 
and the lies! renovator of old 
leather. It oils, softens, black- 
ens and protects. Use 

Eureka 
Harness Oil 

on your host harness, your old har- 
ness, and your ^arrlajce top. ami I hey 
will not only Wok heller hut wear 
longer. Hold every when- In cans— all 
sizes from half pints to five gallons. 
Madt 11 si * Ml * k 11 oil co. 



VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV 



DRINK 

GLEIN 

Main Office Newberry's 
216 S SpringSt. 



ROCK 



■ 

i 
« 
m 

A Pure Mountain Spring J[ 
Crystal Water » 
* 
1 



Kura Btored, made to order and remodeled. 
D. Bonoff, 247 S. Broadway, opp. City Hall 



Puritas Root Beer 



The beverage that pleases the palate 

ICE & COLD STO RAGE CO. 

PHILS ffl . j<>. ^^H^^^^^^HM^^^^HM^HMM^MH^^^^^^^^^B^^H 



The children's especial favorite 
Tel. Main 228 




ARMORED CRUISER BROOKLYN. 

Next to the Oregon the armored cruiser Brooklyn is probably the most famona ship in 
the United States navy. She ranks all others in our navy of her class, and is equal to the 
best armored nisera of other navies. When the Flying Squadron was formed the Brooklyn 
was selected > the flagship of Commodore Schley, commander of the squadron. At San- 
tiago she was in important factor in the destruction of Cervera's fleet. Since the close of 
the war with Spain the Brooklyn has been the flagship of the Asiatic squadron. Rear 
Admiral Watson was recently succeeded as commander of the Asiatic squadron by Rear 
Admiral Kemey. who, with the Bryoklyn as his flagship, is now in command of the United 
States fleet in Chinese waters. 



HOTEL 

del Monte 

MOtfT-EREY, CALIFORNIA.* 



In every detail and in all its 
Envionment Ideally 
Californian 




The Most Magnificent Hotel 
The Most Expansive Landscape 
The Most Varied Forests 
The Most Delightful Temperature 
The Most Superb Flowers 



IN ALL- 
AMERICA 



One hundred and twenty-six acres of cultivated 
ground, and almost the whole of the Peninsula 
of /tonterey for a playground 



Send for illustrated pamphlet to any agent 
or the Southern Pacific Company, 
of for special monthly rates, write 



W. A. JUNKER 



MANAGER 



Hartford Oil Company 

ARE NOW DRILLING 



McKittrick, Cal., July 24, 1900 

HARTFORD OIL CO. 

Cur r ier Bui lding , 

Los Ange 1 es , Ca 1 . 

The drill will drop July 26. 

CHAS. YOULE. 

No more stock will be sold after we strike oil. Buy 
now. Stock 1 2 J/2 cents per share. 

HARTFORD OIL COMPANY 

J. S. DILLON, President M C. DILLON, Secretary 



YOSEMITE 
VALLEY 

SEASON NOW OPEN 

Visit the valley early and enjoy the 
spring-tide bloom and the niHjesty of 
the marvelous waterfalls at their 
flood. Comfortable stages carry you 
through the great forests of the 
Sierras to this wonderland and there 
are first-class hotels for your accom- 
modation. Any ageut of the South- 
ern Pacific Company will make reser- 
vation and give you full particulars 
concerning the trip to the Yosemite 
and the companion marvel 

MARIPOSA 
BIG TREES 

Special rates from Los Angeles and 
Southern California to Yosemite and 
return, with special sleepers. 
Inquire at or address 

Southern Pacific Co. 

261 5. Spring St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



g A. R. MAINES MFG. CO. 

435 S. Spring St., Los Angeles. 



Orient 
Bicvcles 



SIX HODELS 



•p i? To Choose From 



Absolutely the Best Bicycle 
in the Market . . . 



Women's Pacific 




Coast Oil Co. 

lINCORPORATtiD 



Capital $300,000 
Stock — 



Fully paid and Nun-assessable 
Par Value $1.00 

An Open Letter to Our Stockholders 

SUMMERLAND, CAL , JULY 6, 1900. 

Women'* Pacific Coa*t Oil Co-, Los Angeles. Cal. 

Ladies:— Contract for Hickey & Robinson received and delivered. 1 nave to report 
that work is begun on the derrick, and that the drillers expect to be able to begin drill- 
ing next Tuesday. It will be necessary for you to buy and ship the 1% casing at once 
1 presume the best that can be done with 'he notice given will be to get it started on 
the freight Monday. I told them I would write to you today, ordering you to ship it, 
and that seemed to be satisfactory to them. I am very sincerely yours, 

DWIGHT KEMPTON. 



334 Copp Building, 218 S. Broadway 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Phone John 1 1*1 



IHII1U 



GEO. RICE & SONS. (Inc.) LOS ANGELES. 



WESTERN 
GRAPH I C 

<Jln Illustrated Family Weekly of t/?e Sovithwest 

WITH WHICH IS c|o N 8 O L I D A T E 1> T H K I. <> S A N Sllll S 0 N I) A V ft O B I. D AND CALIFORNIA 0 U B I O 

fx xv, " (No. 5. Los Angeles, Saturday, August 4, 1900. Price 10 Cents 




WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

irfn Illustrated Fa.mily Weekly of t6e Southwest 

WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED THE 

SUNDAY WORL D and CAL IFORNIA CURIO 
OEO. RICE_& SONS, (Inc.) 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY MORNING AT 

Sll-313 New High Street Telephone Main 1053 

■ NTIKIO AT TKI LO« ANQELfl PO»T OMlCI Ai 8f CONO-CLA S9 MATTII 

SUBSCRIPTIONS— Three Dollars a Year; or, Twenty five cents 
a month, collected by Remittance Card system, all postage paid 
by the publishers. 

CONTRIBUTIONS— We pay cash for accepted contributions, 
those containing photographs for reproduction being most avail- 
able. The usual rules regarding manuscripts should be observed 
to insure consideration. 

She Editor's Say 

THE eyes of all Southern California are just 
now considerably attracted by the first few 
shots of an expected newspaper war be- 
tween the Times and the Herald. The coming into 
the field of the millionaire oil king, Wallace Hardi- 
son. his purchase of the Herald and changing its 
politics, got a "rise" — as the anglers say — out of 
Editor Otis at once. The first fling of the Times 
was in the old familar style of that paper, in- 
cluding some offensive personalities; this is be- 
ing followed by a series of quotations from the 
Herald of years ago, though the innuendoes there- 
by intended are not subtle enough not to be ab- 
solutely transparent to the reading public. The 
Herald's answers have been unequivocal, but, to 
the people of this section, who have been edu- 
cated to the billingsgate and bluster of the Times 
eagle, weak and ineffective. But the real fight 
is to come, and it will not be entirely a war of 
words. The result will be determined by the con- 
tents of the respective coffers of the two journals. 
The Times is a producing property, paying large 
dividends on the actual value of the plant, but 
without backing other than the prestige of suc- 
cess and the energy of its founder; it has not even 
the earnest sympathy of its most valued support- 
ers. The Herald will shortly enjoy the comforts 
of owning its own building, with a plant a degree 
finer than that of its contemporary. It has un- 
limited gold to back it up on every proposition and 
the encouragement of the people for a fearless, im- 
personal newspaper. 

With the facts before us we are all pleased to 
witness the battle. Gentlemen, to your swords! 

The extent to which usury is practiced in Los 
Angeles and other cities of the coast is as a sealed 
book to the great majority of people who are not 
so unfortunate as to be obliged to resort to the 
money lenders to tide over a period of hardupness. 
More especially has this evil control over petty 
public officials who, with unvarying sums coming 
to them for an assured period, find it an easy mat- 
ter to exceed their income by "shaving" their 
warrants, and even pledging them for months in 
advance at the offices of the later day Shylocks. 
An instance of the robbing characteristics of these 
men has become public in San Francisco, in the 
person of J. A. Macdonald, a money broker of that 
city, no better and probably no worse than others 
of his kind. He has caused the arrest of a man 
to whom he had made a loan of $275 at a monthly 
interest of 5 per cent., a rate that, whatever the 
law may say, has all the essential elements of rob- 
bery. These brokers, to whom the distress of fel- 
low mortals merely represents so much collateral, 
are more to be feared than a band of highway- 
men. Macdonald's victim claims to have paid in- 
terest to the amount of $300. and yet the pound-of- 
llesh gentlemen asserts that the debt is still as large 
as it was in the beginning. It is high time that 
the blood-sucking fraternity be given a legislative 
check. They ought to be limited to a decent in- 
terest, and forced to pay a reasonable license. 
When a man has paid $300 on a $275 debt, to hold 
him for the entire principal is, clearly, to hold him 
lip. This is only one of many like instances, but 
the greatest terrors is in the cases of unprotected 
women and men with families dependent upon 
them, whose very existence is often put in jeopar- 
dy by the vise-grip of the five per cent a month 
leeches. It is impossible to legislate against us- 
ury, but a lesson in the way to abolish the practice 
may be learned from our sister republic, Mexico, 
which runs its own pawnshop with eminent satis- 
faction to all. 

^ ,< < 

One of the most ancient fakes ever perpetrated 
since the establishment of newspapers is soon to 
be passed out to the people of this State, with the 
assistance of a large proportion of the press of 
California, to whose absolute injury it is. It is a 
"syndicate" of Eastern papers, which purpose 
sending to the coast a "special train" (of one car 
attached to a regular passenger train) with a corps 
of writers and artists to "write up" the country. 
The "syndicate" has sent to the various papers of 
the State, an alluring circular, painting in rosy 
colors the vast benefits that will accure to the 
country from the hundreds of columns of text and 
illustrations appearing in several influential East- 



ern journals simultaneously; but with equal fa- 
cility do they avoid noting that the aforesaid writ- 
ers are professional grafters of the worst type, 
who demand large sums of money from the busi- 
ness men and institutions of each city and town 
for every line written and every picture engraved. 
The community that fails to come to time and 
put up its mon<»y.will either be left out of the 
write up altogetner or "roasted" in the most ap- 
proved fashion. It is surprising how many news- 
papers have published puffs of the proposed com- 
ing of this carload of schemers. Their "special" 
car talk should condemn them in the minds of all 
thinking people. Instead of traveling like gentle- 
men, patronizing the best hotels and spending a 
little money, they descend upon us like a one- 
ring circus — a cheap lot, who live in their car by 
night and skin the public by day. Commercial 
bodies in places where they are likely to uncouple 
their car should adopt suitable measures for warn- 
ing the people, that the reception of the "syndi- 
cate" may be such that they wil! start their car 
toward home soon after arrival. 

t < ..<t 

The congressional fight in the Republican ranks 
has narrowed down to Byron L, diver and James 
McLachlan. with the Times beating the brush for 
some one who will enter the race and accept the 
support (sic) if that paper. Ex-Governor Bever- 
idge has refused the hook absolutely, which would 
appear to the casual observer a very sensible thing 
to do at his age, also considering that he has been 
loaded with more honors and blessed with more of 
this world's goods than falls to the lot of most 
men. Judge Fitzgerald gently but firmly pushed 
aside the offer of the congressional nomination at 
the hands of the Times and is out to succeed him- 
self on the Superior bench, to which office there 
is much dignity and more profit. 

As between the two announced candidates the 
Graphic unhestitantly picks Byron L. Oliver, a vig- 
orous, self-made young man. with a clean record, 
ambitious and capable. There are no failures 
against him and with his oratory, sound logic and 
determination would make a representative that 
the sixth district would be proud of. 

t$ d?^ t$ 

Small remittances are life and soul of the trade 
of today. They are especially needed by newspa- 
pers, magazines, book publishers, advertising 
tradesmen, manufacturers, merchants, farmers, and 
by private citizens who want to make payment for 
small orders. The present postoffice money order 
system does not fill the bill. It is both incon- 
venient and costly. The present method of being 
compelled to make a journey to the postoffice, is 



T RUSH BRONSON, as nearly every man, wo- 
I • man and child in Los Angeles knows, is 
J the resident manager of the Orpheum. He 
is the fellow who arranges the acts, picks up new 
talent and issues passes to the show. All this has 
nothing to do with the story, except as a matter 
of identification. Rush is looking for a pair of 
black eyes — not black eyes as designated when de- 
scribing a brunette, for, his wife is one of the hand- 
somest brunettes in the city; but black eyes that 
come from close, swift contact with something. 
To dispel the possible conclusion that Rush is 
on the warpath for somebody, it is necessary to 
state that he is not at all particular whose eyes 
they may be, just so that there is sufficient provo- 
cation for him to hand over the black feature. He 
doesn't say so, but it is a safe bet that if he was 
given the choice of an assortment of nice, black- 
able eyes he would pick those of some dramatic 
critic. And this is not a natural bloodthirstiness 
on Bronson's part, either. It is the result of 
physical training, and every purchaser of a ticket 
to the Orpheum morning matinee may feel his 
biceps without extra charge. The scribe has se- 
cured from Mr. Bronson a verbal outline of what 
is necessary for the production of the remarkable 
physical development that he has accumulated in 
a few short months. After his morning bath he 
breakfasts upon fruit, and for the ensuing quarter 
of an hour enjoys watching a boy. who he hires 
by the month smoke a cigar — for he denies him- 
self this luxury on hygienic grounds. Then un- 
til the lunch hour he writes passes and watches 
and listens to amateurs who are desirous of be- 
coming professionals at $1000 a week. At noon he 
eats a gallon bowl of milk and crackers. This 
fits him for his afternoon exercise which consists 
of a 75-mile bicycle ride, followed by a few 
rounds sparring at the Athletic Club. Three yards 
of porterhouse steak, with the necessary trim- 
mings, constitute his evening meal. 
No wonder he feels his muscle! 

Jl Jl ,< 

A handsome building is being erected on Los 
Angeles street near Second by Blake, Moffit & 
Towne, the paper dealers of New York, San Fran- 
cisco and this city. It is of buff pressed brick, 
granite and sandstone, with plate glass front, four 
stories 70x14 feet, and would do credit to the bon 
ton section of Broadway. Completed, the building 



a serious embargo, represented by small sums. 
The time to close a business transaction is when 
the buyer is in the mind. If he has to wait until 
he can make a troublesome visit to the postoffice 
and endure probably "a standing in line" until his 
turn comes, often consuming more time than the 
sum he intends to send is worth, he is pretty like- 
ly to refrain from making his desired purchase. 
Business houses at present receive large sums in 
the aggregate in stamps, silver coin, and small 
checks on inland banks (costing from 10 cents to 
20 cents to collect). One large Chicago publisher 
reports the recefpt of upwards of $350,000 a year 
in postage stamps alone: about $1,000 a day. Two 
commercial houses report daily receipts of $15,000 
in small sums, most of Which consists of stamps, 
silver, small checks, and paper money, none of 
which yield the government a fee. A strong move- 
ment is now on foot in the East to remedy all 
this. It is proposed to retire $50,000,000 of the 
currency now afloat, by the issuance of other paper 
money in denominations of 5, 10, 15, 25 and 50 
cents. This fractional currency is to pass current 
from hand to hand, when two blank spaces are 
left unfilled. When, however, it is desired to con- 
vey the face amount of the .note to a distance, the 
name and address of the payer are filled in, a one 
cent stamp added and the note is forthwith ready 
to be mailed. The postoffice authorities favor the 
plan. 

The new county Board of Education commences 
its career with an act of favoritism as petty as it 
is contemptible. It was in the awarding of a small 
job of printing, less than one hundred dollars, 
that the board has jumped into the old groove in 
which so many educational boards have run — 
their conduct will bear watching. After asking 
for bids from a number of printers as a matter 
of form, the wise men who are to direct the edu- 
cation of the youth of the land in letters and 
honesty and square dealing, ignored the proposal 
of the lowest bidder — a responsible house with a 
reputation for fine products — and awarded the con- 
tract to another firm, the members of which, by 
the way, are active in local politics. Asked for 
an explanation, the board at first refused to en- 
ter into the subject, then did indulge in a little 
puerile defense, and finally took refuge in the 
statement that "according to law they could award 
the worlc to whom they pleased" — which remark 
quite fully exposes the real cause for their action. 
It is not likeiy they would attempt a very gross 
waste of the public funds on the same grounds 
but the act is the same, be it cents or double 
eagles. 



will cost $75,000, and over $150,000 stock will be 
carried. Mr. E. H. Greppin, a member of the 
firm, and of whom we present an excellent like- 
ness, taken in the stationery sample rooms, is the 




B. H. GREPPIN 

manager of this house, and during his six years' 
connection with the firm in this city has built up 
the business to annual sales of over $500,000. Mr. 



Notebook and Camera 

Personalities and Happenings ^ 



Western Graphic 



3 



Greppin is a thorough business man and was for- 
merly engaged in lithography and printing, which 
has given him experience in working qualities of 
paper that has been of much benefit to his present 
patrons. 

The publishers of the Graphic are indebted to 
the Diamond Star Oil Company for the beautiful 
half-tone of the boulevard of Santa Barbara which 
appears in this issue. This company has had a 
series of very striking photos taken of scenes in 
and around the oil fields of California, some of 
which they will use in their forthcoming pros- 
pectus and others will be assembled into a large 
group, embellished with pen sketches of California 
orange trees and flowers and made into a mam- 
moth photo. Their prospectus will contain a 
twenty-one inch half-tone showing a panoramic 
view of Summerland and the company's property 
at that place. It is the largest and most artistic 
thing of the kind ever produced by an oil com- 
pany in Los Angeles. This company, besides being 
a "dividend producer," seems to be equally cap- 
able of producing artistic and original advertising 
ideas. 

J* 3 Jt 

And here we are again. This time it is Mr. Mur- 
phy's daughter. Mr. Murphy of San Francisco, the 
city with the "golden gate" and other things not 
golden. Several years ago Miss Murphy succeeded 
in capturing a live, genuine Englishman named 
Wolseley. a cousin, it is claimed — the degree not 
being mentioned— of Lord Wolseley. who was once 
a simple "Sir" himself. With true American 
shrewdness the little Murphy maid, presumably as- 
sisted by members of her family, engaged the 
services of a properly equipped minister of the 
gospel and had Sir Charles so securely lassoed in 
the noose of matrimony that no wriggling on his 
part would serve to break the knot. Having ac- 
complished the acme of her girlish dreams, neat 
little cards were issued on which was engraved 
"Lady Anita Theresa Wolseley of Welsely, Stafford, 
Eng." Years have elapsed since that sensational 
occurrence and now. this daughter of Mr. Murphy 
of San Francisco, once more promenades her na- 
tive soil on a short visit to the home of her child- 
hood, heralded as "A Royal Visitor." 

If it were not the sad reflection upon the intelli- 
gence and moral sensibilities of our countrymen 
and countrywomen, announcements of this dis- 
torted character would be amusingly grotesque and 
funny. The immense chasm that exists in Eng- 
land between a simple Knight entitled to the pre- 
fix of "Sir," and a Royal Highness, disappears 
with astonishing rapidity under the filling-in pro- 
cess of special press notices and interested society 
gabble, whenever it shows its yawning throat in 
our land of universal liberty and aggressive inde- 
pendence. It is not because we have the slightest 
doubt of the capacity of Mr. Murphy's daughter to 
manipulate royal prerogatives and emoluments, 
provided they are thrust upon her in a modest, 
urgent manner, that actuates our feeling in this 
matter. We are simply anxious about that sweet 
little New York girllet, just out of school, with 
her Count of the French "Court." How wretchedly 
miserable she will be when she learns of the 
"royal" advantages she might have secured, had 
she lassoed an English "Sir." 

J* J* -J* 

One of the most interesting characters of the 
streets of Los Angeles is "old man Shaw" as he 
is known by many. To others, of the "old-timer" 
crowd, he is remembered with compassion, for in 
the early days he was a man of marked ability 
and great energy and was identified with several 
important enterprises. From some unaccountable 
cause his mind became unbalanced on the subject 
of a deep water harbor and flying machines, plans 
for both of which he produces by the score. 

S,ome years ago he advertised for a wife and 
was successful in his use of printers' ink, being 
married by telegraph to a woman in New Jersey, 
who immediately afterward came to Los Angeles 
to meet her supposedly rich husband for the first 
time. Upon her arrival he took her to his home— 
a hut built in the branches of a tree in the foot- 
hills. The bride demurred to the situation and 
primitiveness of the habitation, but, it is said, oc- 
cupied the tree-top shelter for several weeks be- 
fore returning to the East. In all earnestness ho 
now states that Frank Flint is to secure him an- 
other wife, for which Mr. Flint is to receive $10. 
000. 

Some weeks since a Graphic man asked Shaw 
to write a biography of himself, which is here 
reproduced, literatim: 

Frederick Merrill Shaw — Born in Castloton, Rut- 
land county, Vermont, August 27. 1872. His 
grandfather and four brothers came to Vermont 
when it was a wilderness and settled on the Con- 
necticut river, naming the place Putney, after Put- 
ney on the Thames, Eng.. where the remains of 
the Scotch clan sought refuge. His great uncle, 
Samuel Shaw, Surgeon-General of the Army of the 
United States in the war of 1812, together with his 
brother Jonathan, were the two who gave the 
nicknames of "Uncle Sam" and "Jonathan" to the 
United States. 

Frederick, with his brother Henry, went to Bos- 
ton at the age of fifteen and apprenticed himself 
to the piano forte builders, Hallett, Davis & Co., 
at the same time completing his medical education 
with Dr. James C. Kelly. Advised by that gentle- 
man, he went to sea for his health in '49, and came 



into San Francisco in September of that year, in 
time to vote at the first Gubernatorial election. He 
returned via Panama the following year, making 
the preliminary reeonnoisance for the Panama 
railway. Went to St. Ixjuis and went into the 
steamboat business, where he made the acquaint- 
ance of James B. Eads, the engineer. Eads as- 
sisted and advised him when he determined to 
bUlld a terminal protection on this coast for the 
Atchison people, whose first stakes at Grasshopper 
Falls. Kansas, were driven by him. Encouraged 
by Eads' endorsement of his plans, he went to 
Europe in '73 to examine works of like nature. 
Returning here in '71 he took up a thorough and 
systematic hydrographic and topographical survey 
of the ocean bottom between Newport and Point 
Dume. finally settling upon South Santa Monica as 
the most available point. Professor Louis Agassiz 
had pointed out the fact that at the last great 
glacial period the foot of a glacier had pushed a 
terminal moraine into the bay: and if such sub- 
merged moraine could be found it would be the 
ideal place for an artificial harbor. A careful 
search with lead and line discovered the existence 
of such a moraine between Point Firmin and Point 
Dume and also the existence of an eddy thirty 




P.M. SHAW 
"Third Vice-President and General Manager 
People's Steam Transit Company" 

miles in diameter, with a three-mile current pass- 
ing to the westward past the Ballona lake. This 
suggested the use of the Eads, jetty system to as- 
sist in scouring out a deep sea harbor at that 
point. * * * * 

FREDERICK MERRILL SHAW. 
Third Vice-President and General Manager 
People's Steam Transit Co. A. P. Maginnis, 
Secy., W. R. Bacon, Asst. Secy, and Atty., T. L. 
Duque, Director. 

The names and titles following his .signature are 
always used in his communications, which in a 
few quarters are frequent and voluminous. The 
omitted portion of his biography at the end is of 
the nature of a prospectus for his "company." 
.< < >t 

Great inroads are being made in the ranks of 
the Lob Angeles pioneers of late, the most recent 
instance being in the death of "Joe" [layer, as he 
was familiarly known throughout Southern Cali- 
fornia and Arizona. His demise at the compara- 
tively early age of fifty-four shocked multitudes of 
people, as he was known to and liked by a very 
large circle of people — as large, in fact, as that 
possessed by any man in this section. 

Joseph i.ayer, though of German birth, received 
an excellent education at St. Vincent's College, 
near Latrobe, Pennsylvania. While a mere youth, 
he enlisted in the army and acted as clerk at 
headquarters of the Army of the Cumberland. In 
the language of Ma jor-General It. W. Johnson, in 
writing a warm testimonial for his subordinate, 
"be (Bayer) is a good clerk, a good printer, a 
good soldier. In every way he is reliable, sober, 
industrious, energetic and an Honorable man. He 
Is recommended as being a worthy, upright and 
correct man." 

This is high praise; and Bayer, in all the rela- 
tions of life, showed himself deserving of these un- 
stinted enconiums. As a young man he was a 
model of manly vigor and comeliness. Brave as a 
lion he was tender as a woman. His business 
career in Los Angeles and Arizona was charac- 
terized by high integrity and rectitude. Me may 



fairly be called the pioneer of the oil producers in 
this city, he. in company with his partner. Gen. 
C. F. A. Last, having first exploited the oil meas- 
ures at their Second street Park. 

There is great grief amongst the best people of 
Los Angeles at the death of Joe Bayer. Generous, 
unselfish, a good citizen, a good husband and a 
god father, as he has gone to the grave followed by 
the sincere regrets of all who knew him. In the 
words permitted by the church to which he be- 
longed, "May he rest in peace." 

Jl Jl 

The Chamber of Commerce has on exhibition at 
the Paris Exposition samples of crude oil and all 
the distillates manufactured in this city as well as 
specimens of crude and manufactured asphalt, with 
quantities of literature giving full data and de- 
: d ipt ion of the oil industry of Southern California. 
Jl < •* 

We present to our readers on another page 
a late picture of Mr. Byron L. Oliver, one of 
the most talked of candidates for the Re- 
publican Congressional nomination in the Sixth 
California District. Mr. Oliver needs no introduc- 
tion at our hands; he has grown up among the 
people of Los Angeles and his life is an open book. 

He is of the rugged and sturdy type that is rep- 
resentative of the successful American; making his 
own way in the world, he obtained an education by 
his own efforts. Laboring in the harvest fields, he 
gained funds sufficient to take him to the Uni- 
versity of Michigan and once there he worked day 
and night to pay his way through that institution 
of learning. After graduating with honor from its 
law school, he returned to Los Angeles to prac- 
tice his chosen profession. He is one of our well- 
known attorneys and stands well with his fellow 
members of the Los Angeles bar. 

Mr. Oliver is a magnetic and forceful speaker, re- 
sembling Senator Beveridge in many respects, and 
as a campaigner, he has an excellent record. Pop- 
ular with the members of the party, especially 
with the younger element, he is meeting with much 
favor in his canvass. He has just made a trip 
through the district and has received many assur- 
ances of loyal support. 

Byron L. Oliver belongs to no clique or faction; 
he is an ideal candidate from the fact that he will 
have the united support of the party should he 
be nominated. No record of defeats militate 
against his availability and his candidacy, should 
he be the nominee, will call for no apologies or 
arguments of defense. 

He is straight, clean and just the age to begin 
a career in the Nation's capitol. Endowed with 
good hard business judgment, a pleasing personal- 
ity, convincing eloquence, and a familiarity with 
parliamentary practice, he is well equipped to rep- 
resent this magnificent district. Mr. Oliver is a 
growing man and we predict a splendid future for 
him. His nomination would certainly give strength 
to the National ticket. 



Nellie Thorne, who will play Esther in Ben-Hur 
next season, is a young English girl, 20 years of 
age, who made her debut three years ago in Lon- 
don in John Hare's production of "A Bachelor's 
Romance" at the Globe theater. She made a hit 
and immediately became the talk of London, tho 
critics congratulating Mr. Hare on his discovery 
of a young actress of charming naturalness. She 
comes of a noted English theatrical family. Her 
father is Fred Thorne and her uncle the popular 
Tom Thorne of London. She was trained for the 
stage by her aunt. Miss Sarah Thorne. principal 
of the Margate acnool of Elocution. Miss Thorne 
has twice visited America as a member of John 
Hare's Company. Last season she played in this 
country with Olga Nethersole. 

All absent minded minister of Manayunk, Pa., 
tells this story on himself: "I live in one of a row 
of brick houses that are all exactly alike, and when 
I came home from a walk the other day I saw a 
new hat rack in the hall. 'I don't think much of 
your hat rack,' I called up stairs. 'It has a cheap 
look.' I hung my hat on it and turned into the 
parlor. A strange young man, a friend of my 
daughter I supposed, sat with his feet on the 
piano stool and smoked a cigarette. I abominate 
( igarettes. 'You seem to he making yourself ai 
home.' I observed cuttingly. 'Yes, why shouldn't 
I?' he retorted, looking up. I looked around the 
parlor, and the furnishings seemed strange to me. 
'By Jove!' I thought, quick as a flash, 'I'm in the 
wrong house.' And, sure enough, I was. I apolo- 
gized to all hands: but I won sorry I had said 
what I did about the hat rack." 

His Honor: "You are charged with stealing 
chickens; have you any witnesses?" 

Mouldy Mike: "I have not. I don't usually steal 
chickens before witnesses." 

She had a voice like a siren, and when she sang' 
'Mid play sure, sand pal aces, though heam's a 
Rome, 

Be it averse so wum bull, there snow play sly 
comb. 

And so on, to the conclusion, there wasn't a dry 
eye in the room. 

When a man says there Is no use talking you 
may as well prepare for a long-winded argument. 

Silence is anything but golden to the poor girl 
who is dumb to the entreaties of a wealthy suitor. 

When a juvenile goat sleeps it is a case of kld- 
08 pping. 



Western Graphic 



Literary Gossip 

Conducted by^^^Garner Curran 

HOW all Bath in the days of Beau Nash was 
rent asunder over the question of "Mon- 
sieur Beaucaire;" how that arbiter of fash- 
ion forbade him the pumprooms; how, neverthe- 
less, he entered them with the haughtiest beauty 
of the watering place on his arm; how he in- 
trigued and dueled and made love with fine French 
grace, none being sure whether he was a great 
nobleman or a card-sharping barber adventurer; 
how he touched the heart of Lady Mary Carlisle, 
while rousing her pride against him — this is what 
Booth Tarkington romances about in the dainty 
eighteenth century story to which he has given 
the name of his hero. It is a long way from "The 
Gentleman From Indiana's" tussle with love, jour- 
nalism and white caps to the polished and pow- 
dered comedy of a century and a half ago, but Mr. 
Tarkington takes the step easily. His little story 
challenges comparison with Egerton Castle's "The 
Bath Comedy," laid in the same environments at 
about the same period, and does not come off sec- 
ond best. It has an infusion of genuine feeling, 
lacking in the sprightly artificiality of the Castle 
tale, and it is shorter — a cardinal merit in a pro- 
fessedly slight work. "Monsier Beaucaire" has 
illustrations, and papers and decorations in eigh- 
teenth century style, suitable to its own fragile 
Dresden china prettiness, (Doubleday, Phillips & 
Co.) 

.4 .4 .4 

The Macmillan Company, publishers, New York, 
issue "A Friend of Caesar," by William Stearns 
Davis. This is a romance of ancient Rome in the 
time of Caesar and Pompeius, in the generation 
before Christ. The hero is a young patrician jus't 
returned home from his university course at Ath- 
ens to take possession of his patrimony, and to 
marry the bride bequeathed him in his father's 
will. Meeting the girl after four years of absence 
he finds her so charming that he falls head and 
ears in love with her. But the course of true love 
does not run smooth. The young man espouses 
the cause of Caesar then at his camp at Ravenna 
as the consul of Gaul, against whom the patrician 
senators and Pompeius are conspiring. His in- 
tended bride has for her guardian an uncle who 
is consul-elect and deep in the anti-Caesarian con- 
spiracy and failing to enlist the young man in his 
cause he forbids him the house and forms a con- 
spiracy to murder him organized by a graceless 
young profligate who loves the young woman. Ac- 
cording to the terms of the will the vast property 
of the young heir goes to the girl in case he dies 
before he is twenty-five. Hence the conspirators 
are fighting for a fortune as well as for a bride. 
The conspiracy is foiled and finally after many 
narrow escapes with Mark Antony from the revo- 
lutionists, he arrives at the camp of Caesar, 
marches with him across the Rubicon and be- 
comes in the two-years' campaign against Pom- 
peius one of his most trusted lieutenants. 

The interest of the story is kept up to the end 
with adventures enough for a dozen ordinary nov- 
els. The aim is to give a graphic description of 
private and public life in Rome and afterwards in 
Alexandria, where Caesar finally triumphs over 
the web that the vastest conspiracy in history had 
woven for his undoing and when he triumphs, the 
hero rescues his bride who had become the ward of 
Cleopatra. 

* .4 .4 

"The Courtesy Dame," a novel by Murray Gil- 
christ, is in preparation at Dodd, Mead & Co.'s. 
This story is the work of an English author who is 
new to the American public, but who is fortunate 
to be introduced here through a very clever ex- 
ample of his work. 

,4 .4 jk 

"April's Sowing," by Gertrude Hall, which will 
be published early in September by McClure, Phil- 
lips & Co., is a story of young love, told, it is said, 
with the same truth of psychology, the same deli- 
cate sympathy with the human heart, the same 
grace of style that marked "Far from Today." 

J% 

W. E. Norris, author of "Matrimony" and 
"Mademoiselle de Musac," recently completed a 
row novel, which will be called "The Flower of 



the Flock." This story, which is spoken of as a 
remarkably excellent example of this favorite au- 
thor, will be published about August 1 by D. Ap- 
pleton & Co. 

■ 4 ,«* Jl 

The story of "Knights in Fustian," which has 
just been published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co., is 
the work of a young Carolinian whose name is 
not "Caroline Brown," though that cognomen ap- 
pears on the title page of her novel. She is one 
of a family of literary and scientific tastes, and 
has been a teacher. 

■M .4 -.4 

A son of Dr. George MacDonald, the once popu- 
lar novelist, who is not heard of much in these 
days, when the younger school of Scotch writers 
is receiving enthusiastic notice, is about to make 
his first appearance as a writer. The Century 
Company will publish an adventure novel that he 
has written, called "The Sword of the King," and 
dealing with England under James II. 

The English letter in the July number of The 
Bookman reports Miss Beatrice Whitby's new 
story, "Bequeathed," which the Harpers have just 
published, as being one of the ten books in great- 
est demand during the past month in England. 
Miss Whitby's earlier story, "The Awakening of 
Mary Fenwick." scored a decided success some 
years since, and the publishers are confident that 
"Bequeathed" will meet with an equal favor, as 
the first edition was sold out on the day of publi- 
cation. 

,«* ,•* jl 

Mr. F. Kimball Scribner. having abandoned 
newspaper work for the writing of stories of ad- 
venture, and in "A Continental Cavalier" (The 
Abbey Press) tackles the period of the American 
revolution. He tells a pleasing tale of love and 
war, of which the hero is a young Frenchman 
who was aide-de-camp to Lafayette. Among the 
illustrations to the book is an interesting portrait 
of the author, facing an entertaining autobio- 
graphical note. 

■ 4 ,4 ..«* 

"The Last Lady of Mulberry" is a tale of Italy 
and the Italian quarter of New York City, told by 
Henry Wilton Thomas with a vigor and humor 
which deserve well of the world. A buxom Nea- 
politan who appears on the stage as a chorus girl 
is the heroine, and she displays a native feminine 
cunning which is entirely convincing and serves 
to bind the book together, in spite of certain exag- 
gerat'on which prevails. An abiding sense of the 
ridiculous and the involuntary compassion which 
the English-speaking person holds for the Latin 
races picture the entire Italian people as altogeth- 
er irresponsible and childish. (D. Appleton & Co.) 



Some people get notions in their heads that are 
queer. At Pomona an eccentric citizen equipped 
his house with screen doors and had them made 
with a circular hole in the middle to avoid the 
trouble of driving out the flies. A farmer not far 
from Santa Ana who had two windmills on his 
place, recently took one down and sold it under 
the belief that there was not wind enough for 
both. A "greener" near Gospel Swamp, who 
wanted ham. soaked a hog in brine to avoid the 
trouble after it was killed. 



i 



* « « « 



Che Paper in this Publication is 
"fialf tone Book," furnished by • • • « 

Blake, moffitt $ Cowne 



« « « « 



Paper Dealers 



« « « « 



Paper « of * all • Descriptions 



Cos Hnaeles 



California 



ED U CATIONAL 



\ Brownsberger 
Home School . . 



Shorthand and Typewriting 4 

903 South Broad way. Tel. White 4871 $ 

£ This institution owns the largest number W 

3 of typewriters of any school in California >" 

1 Touch method in typewriting exclusively. More posi- 5 

3| tlons are offered to the school at a gond Balary than ^ 

C we can fill. Only individual work. Office training. • 
m Machine at home free. Hours 9 to 12; 1.30 to 4.30, 

J SPECIAL SUMHER RATES ^ 



2 1'i W. Third St. Tel Black 2651 

Oldest, largest and best training school in the city. 
Thorough, practical courses of study in Bookkeeping, 
Shorthand, Typewriting and Telegraphy. College 
trained and experienced teachers. Hest equipped 
Business College room West of Chicago. This is the 
only school in the city that hns the right of using the 
Budget of Voucher System of Bookkeeping. Come and 
see it. Our students have the advantage of Spanish, 
(ierman and I.ou V. chapin's Course of l ectures free. 
It will cost you nothing to investigate the merits of 
om school before going elsewhere. Special rates for 
the summer. Catalogue and full information on ap- 
plication. Address 

l . A. KiiHineaa College, 212 W. Third St., L. A. 



* 

i 

| Los Angeles j 
| Military Academy f 



■a 



Begins its seventh year September 25th. 

Classical, English and Scientific Courses. 

The common branches thoroughly taught. 

Prepares for business. 

Sanford A. Hooper, Head Master 
Edward L. Hardy, Associate 

Catalogue mailed upon request. Visitors 

take Westlake (First street) Traction cars. 



3 H^fe»)N^Vf*(«^(«^ , fe*^r» t ^r»)Vr»)V.-»--'fefc»)f 



Los Angeles School 
ot Dramatic Art . . . 



Incorporated Sept. 1899 



Tel. James 711 



Training for the Platform, Pulpit and StHgc Cu'tivation of 
the Speaking Voice for every purpose. 

Directors— G. A. Dobinson, John D. Hooker, W. C. Patter- 
son, B. R. Baumgardt, Sheldon Borden. 

I he Art Building, (114 S. Hill St., I.ou Angeles 




The Los Angeles Military Academy 

A SCHOOL FOR SOYS 

j* Begins its Seventh Year September 2$th, 1900 *s* ^ 

IN THIS SCHOOL your son will be treated as an individual, lie will be taught by trained men — College grad- 
uates who arc experienced teachers. The instructors average one to every ten students. Class room, library 
and laboratory equipment is modern and complete. 

MILITARY DKII.I. AND PHYSICAL CHI-TURK 

Sanford A. Hooper. A. M.. Head Master Edward I.. Hardy, Associate 

I (avid Peacock. Lieut. 1". S. Navy; Commandant 



Western Graphic 



Absolute 
Guarantee 
Against Loss 



THE OROAN1ZERS 
OF THE 



OPH I R 

OIL COMPANY 



Have arranged with the California 
Safe Deposit and Trust Company of 
San Francisco, to hold sufficient secur- 
ities in trust for the purchasers of 
Ophir Oil stock to 

Insure Holders of this Stock 
Against Loss .... 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Com- 
pany shall fail to produce oil in pay- 
ing quantities sufficient to bring its 
stock to par value ( one dollar per 
share), purchasers will receive back, 
with accrued interest, the entire 
amount paid in by them for stock. 

The securities thus held in trust are 
adequate, and an investment in Ophir 
Oil Stock is as secure as a United 
States Government Bond, and vastly 
superior to deposits in Banks of Sav- 
ings, for the reason that it combines 

Absolute Security 
with Immense 
Possibilities 
of Gain 

when oil is struck. There is no "read- 
ing between the lines" in this propo- 
sition. Whatever happens to the 
Ophir Oil Company your investment 
is safe. You cannot lose. Only a 
limited amount of this Secured Stock 
is offered for sale. Its property con- 
sists of 800 acres in Coalinga District, 
Fresno county, being all of section 23 
and % of section 14, township 21 south, 
range IS east, M. D. M. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

WARREN QILLHLKN 

President Broadway Bank, Los Angeles 

JOHN W. A. OFF 

Cashier State Bank and Trust Co., Los 
Angeles 

JOHN MA80N GARDINER 

Engineer and General Contractor of Pub- 
lic Works, Phoenix, A. T.,and Los Angeles 

JOHN MARTIN 

President Martin Pipe and Foundry Co. 
Mgr. Stanley Electric Co., Han Francisco 

GEORGE KENT HOOPER 

Manager Occidental Hotel, San Francisco 

NATHANIEL J. MANSON 

Attorney-at-Law, San Francisco 

H. R. HURLBUT 

Fifteen years in charge of Advertising 
Department, San Francisco Call 



Ophir Oil Co. 

Los Angeles Office 

402 Douglas Bldg. 

San Francisco Office, 

Room 14, Fifth floor, Mills Building: 




Under t h 



THE consolidation of the two oil exchanges 
will undoubtedly have a very beneficial ef- 
fect upon the oil stock market. It will elim- 
inate from the consolidated body many brokers 
who have been disturbing elements in the old ex- 
changes, thus placing the business in the hands of 
men who represent people who buy stocks as an 
investment and not to throw back on the market 
when the price goes up or down a point or two. 
Under the new regime stocks will approximate 
more nearly to intrinsic value and the exchange 
regain the confidence of the public which it had 



D 



e r r l c 



mented on in the press when it was supposed that 
it would injure a political opponent, and the In- 
ferences drawn from the facts have not always 
been fair. This journal will not defend such prac- 
tices as have been brought to light in the Big 
Panoche and Old Glory combination, nor will it 
give its approval to any scheme to sell stocks upon 
false representations, but it would suggest that 
the fact that the "roast" is being used as a po- 
litical bludgeon takes away much of its force. But 
where the unfairness comes in is in assuming that 
the companies are practicing a fraud by asking a 



Men Who Have Made the Oil Industry 



4--TH0MAS HUGHES 



m 
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9 
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* 

* 

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m 

* 

m 
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m 
m 
tf 
m 
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m 
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m 

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«^*****«*«»***a******»*»****«*«»****»**»«»a**»*»**»* 




THERE is no man engaged in the oil business in this section better known or more 
popular than "Tom" Hughes; from the tirst discovery of oil in 18'>.S he has been 
recognized as a leader among its developers. Coming to Los Angeles in 1HH3 from Ari- 
zona, Mr. Hughes became interested in the Los Angeles Planing Mill and was con- 
nected with it for many years. At the time of the first discovery of oil in Los Angeles 
he was associated with the San Pedro Planing Mill Company, but inhereting a taste 
for the oil business from his father, who was an old oil man in Pennsylvania, he 
Immediately devoted all his energies in the new field and has been actively engaged in 
it ever since. He was one of the organizers of the American Crude Oil Company and 
also one of the original incorporators of the Westlakc Oil Company, two of the largest 
and most successful of the local field. Mr. Hughes is also president of the Alpha Oil 
Company and superintendent of the Fullerton Oil Company and the Oceanic Oil Com- 
pany, all good producers. He is also connected with the recently organized Soquel 
Canyon and Ojai Valley companies. 



before the late rivalry began. All of which will he 
greatly to the advantage of legitimate producing 
companies as well as of people who desire to make 
investments. 

Speaking of oil stocks, it is unfortunate that they 
are becoming mixed up with politics. When men 
get mad about politics they will throw more nasty 
mud than in any other vocation in life? and do not 
seem to care who is tarred in the fight. While It 
has long been known that some oil companies 
have been trying to sell their shares in the East- 
ern or European market at rates much above what 
they are offered here, this fact has only been corn- 



higher price for their shares than they are quoted 
at on the exchanges. Very few oil companies are 
selling their stock for the same price at their of- 
fices that are quoted on the exchange. This is 
necessarily so among nun -product ive Companies, 
for in the large volume of stocks sold there Is al- 
ways some people who get seared or hard up and 
who will sell stock for what they can get, and It 
would be manifestly unfair to assume that such In- 
stances should fix the value of the stock. Many 
companies protect their stock by offering to re- 
fund the money within a time limit, but this 
throws an uncertainty around the future, transac- 
t'ons of the company which often delays the ex- 



6 



Western Graphic 



p<j.,.'. t re of money for development purposes. The 
fixing of the office price above the exchange quota- 
tions acts as a tonic on the stock for it prevents 
selling large blocks to brokers who can by this 
means bear any stock they desire. Some compa- 
nies treat their customers equitably by going on 
the exchange and buying shares at the market 
price where it is below the office price. 

But the question arises, "Does a company have 
the equitable right to ask what it pleases for its 
stock " It undoubtedly has and, the only just lim- 
itation of this is that it should make the price uni- 
form. And uniformity cannot always be main- 
tained on account of the difference in expense in 
selling at the home office and abroad. Much of the 
variation in price often arises from the fact that 



the stocks are bought at the home office in blocks 
by brokers who fix the price they ask to fit the 
Inclinations of their customers in eastern markets. 
Big money has been made in the East and in Eu- 
rope by this sort of brokerage, and it is safe to 
assume that most of the stock which has been sold 
in the East has been disposed of in this way. A 
sharp, unscrupulous man can thus easily do a pay- 
ing business. An instance lately came to the no- 
tice of the writer, which, by the way occurred right 
here in Los Angeles. A man purchased a block of 
a ten-cent stock, and on the same day resold it 
for twenty cents. This was done while the stock 
was being largely advertised as a ten-cent stock 
in the daily papers. 

A few oil companies are quoting their stocks in 
the East and in Europe at higher rates than here, 




Music and Art 

Criticism and Comment ^» "Uhe Doings of Artistic Folk 




F*OR those who are pursuing the investigation 
of our own "folk-music." — narrowed down 
as explained last week, to the heritages from In- 
dian and African sources, — the field of original 
music offers much that is of interest and of fas- 
cinating quality. In fact the abundance of this 
material, which began with the earliest contribu- 
tions regarding the manners and customs of the 
Indians from the adventurers who were first to 
come in contact with the natives, down to the 
later investigations of Miss Fletcher and Professor 
Fillmore, will be something of a stumbling-block. 
Fortunately for the student, the earlier writers, in 
treating of the ceremonial dances and songs, were 
illy equipped to write down the music or to use 
musical language in describing them. Such com- 
mentators as Sagard (1632), Marpung (1760) and 
others of this time treat music in America in a 
general way only, such as the writers of Spain who 
tell of ancient Tezcuco, where was held a national 
council which had charge of the musical educa- 
tion of the Aztec youth. The Spaniards were van- 
dals and destroyed all written vestiges of this 
Peruvian music. Flutes and other instruments or 
baked clay were unearthed, and showed that they 
were intended for use with a scale of five tones. 
At the Paris Exposition of 1867, Ambroise Thomas 
wrote down and harmonized two tunes that were 
played for him by Peruvian visitors, but they 
sound quite modern in the garb the great com- 
poser gave them. All the earlier writers tell of 
the songs used on all occasions, public and private, 
solemn and festive; they describe the musical in- 
struments employed, the drums, flutes, rattles, 
tlageolets and their rude congeners, but they do 
not tell us in musical language what the musicians 
played The various modes of vocalization em- 
ployed are treated in a rude and summary way, 
the effect usually prompting a curt reference and 
an abrupt dismissal of the topic. As the interest 
develops in the course of time, men better quali- 
fied to estimate the possibilities of Indian music 
begin to see a system in the singing; these dis- 
cover that the singers have often pleasing and 



I 

Grau Opera Co. 



COMING! 



MAURICE GRAU 
OPERA COMPANY 

Lessees and Managers of 
The Metropolitan Opera Company 



Lonuon, J uue 4, 1000, 
Gentlemen: It is my wish, and thai of the opera company, 
that the Weber piano shall be used at the opera house next 
season as heretofore. The magnificent concert grands which 
yon have sent us for the Sunday night concerts have more 
than confirmed the impression that in tone quality, power and 
carrying capacity the Weber has no superior in the world. 
The leading artists of the company have privately expressed to 
me their delight in the instruments (both grands and uprights) 
furnished for their private use, and it i6 the unanimous ver- 
dict that for concert work, as well as for accompanying the 
voice in singing, the Weber piano is unequaled. 

With regards and best wishes for your contluued prosperity, 
believe me, Very truly yours, 

MAURICE GRAU. 
To the Weber-Whf.ei.ock Co., New York City. 



WEBER AGENCY: 



The Bartlett Music Co. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



well-toned voices, and that the tunes are not half 
bad after you once get used to them. They learn, 
too, that the Indian has no use for nor can he 
understand the chromatic scale, and that he does 
not fathom the intervals of the diatonic plan. 
The investigator sooned learned that the Indian 
had no written music, that it was handed down 
from generation to generation by ear and train- 
ing. Rhythm, of a pronounced and strident sort, 
which was given emphatic expression ou the 
drums and rattles, was the guiding star for those 
who attempted to make a record of what they 
heard. They also recognized that tradition played 
a tremendous part in this folk-music, and that a 
sacred song with the Indians had a powerful odor 
of centuries-old sanctity attached to it. In fact, 
in many cases the music was preserved while the 
original text had been lost in the dim past. H. H. 
Bancroft, in his "Native Races of the Pacific 
Coast," says the Indian boatmen near Fort Yukon 
sang songs "of which they did not understand the 
meaning of the words;" and Stephen Powers, in 
his "Tribes of California." speaks of our own In- 
dians having a "fixed choral, the words of which 
signify nothing and are repeated over and over 
again." Catlin and Schoolcraft, two industrious 
workers among our native races show that the In- 
dians had mnemonic symbols in the shape of 
strings of wampum, like a rosary, or the knotted 
ropes that the Aztecs made use of. Drawings cov- 
ered with animals were symbolic guides also, and 
Engel notes that this chart was used by the peo- 
ple, who from it knew when to respond at inter- 
vals in the chorus. The ethnology of music is one 
that is both wide and closely inter-related when 
we go back of the music that is familiar to us. I 
was, during the Chinese performances at Hazard's 
Pavilion, a year or two ago, greatiy amused by 
the antics of a little Celestial shaver of perhaps 
six years of age who superintended the beating of 
a noisy brass drum. He would give a crash, then 
wander off among the players and circle back to 
his instrument In order to come in on the tutti 
which he did with fine effect. Once he made the 
entire circuit of the hall but was back at his place 
in time to lend full force to ttu> grand crash. This 
proclaimed both a system and a set character to 
the piece which the orchestra was playing for a 
clang on the drum out of time would have been 
disastrous. 

Prof. J. C. Fillmore and Miss Alice Fletcher, in 
their examination of the music of the Omaha In- 
dians, have furnished a basis of study, which may 
be of value to the student who desires to take up 
the music of the Indians about us, such as that of 
the Mission Indians, the Navajoes, Zunis and 
Apaches. Prof. Fillmore frequently expressed to 
me his firm belief that a unity of all music, primi- 
tive and civilized, exists, and that the Indian al- 
ways intends to sing precisely the same harmonic 
intervals which are the staple of our own music; 
all aberrations from harmonic pitch being mere 
accidents and due, for the most part, to imperfect 
training, or the total lack of it. Mr. Fillmore had 
a limited faith in phonographic records, and he 
procured many of them, but in the end he pre- 
ferred to rely on the tunes he had taken down him- 
self for careful study. His claim was that if prop- 
erly manipulated the phonograph was satisfactory, 
but it could easily make a caricature of a song. 
His method was first to listen to a singer without 
attempting to take down what he sang. A gen- 
eral idea gained, he noted the song down, phrase 
by phrase. Then he would sing the song to the 
Indian for his criticism, carefully noting all varia- 
tions, for he found the intervals to vary greatly, 
particularly the third. To explain this further I 
quote: "An Indian would sing a song for me em- 
bodying a chord, i. e., a tone with its third and fifth 
but the third might be so doubtful that I could not 
determine whether he meant a major or a minor 
chord. Then I would sing the song after him, giv- 
ing the third which I suspected he was most likely 
to mean. Usually he would pronounce it correct. 
Then we would sing it together, when he would 
invariably sing it true to pitch, not doubtfully as 
before. But sometimes, when I have sung alone 
a major or a minor third, the Indian would shake 



and some of them boast that they are making 
Easterners and Johnny Bull pay smartly for their 
stocks, but these concerns are on the "after us the 
deluge" order, and are very rare. 

Jl Jl j* 

Although there has been much development work 
going on to the west of Los Angeles, in the neigh- 
borhood of the brea ranch, and numerous reports 
of strikes, for some reason the number of wells 
which are pumping oil west of Western avenue 
can be counted on one's fingers. It is reported that 
many good wells have been capped, but this seems 
unreasonable in a district In which transportation 
is convenient. It is to be hoped that this district 
where so much capital has been expended in ex- 
ploitation may turn out to be a good field, but its 
future is yet to be determined. 



his head and pronounce it wrong. Then I would 
sing it again, giving the other third, whereupon 
he would pronounce it correct and proceed to sing 
it with me. true to pitch. I have never known an 
Indian to stick to a neutral' third under this 
process of examination. He has always evidently 
intended either a major or a minor third. And I 
have always found the same true of every doubtful 
interval. There has never been any serious diffi- 
culty in obtaining clear and decided evidence of 
his intentions by the process of singing for and 
with him." 

At the piano the Indian is quick to discover the 
false intonation. Miss Fletcher has often taken 
down songs from an Indian singer only to be 
laughed at by other members of the tribe for her 
trouble, for her guide was wrong. By striking a 
happy medium between several singers she ar- 
rived at conclusions that passed muster with all 
the Indian singers. Do. Boas, who has met with 
the same difficulty, states that the singers lean 
upon another and that the chorals are much truer 
to harmonic pitch than the individual singers, as a 
rule. It is unsafe therefore to take the perform- 
ance of any one singer as the true standard of In- 
dian singing. One may record any given song 
exactly as the singer gave it and yet be wide of 
the mark. Every singer is likely to sing off pitch, 
and it is within the experience of almost every one 
at congregational singing in churches and camp- 
meetings, that the pitch is commonly departed 
from by those unskilled in song. Even great and 
thoroughly trained singers flatten at times with- 
out knowing it; it is therefore not at all surpris- 
ing that the untutored savage falls from vocal 
grace at times. He does not intend it and it is 
therefore well to look out for him when through 
his aberration he perpetrates false intervals and 
erratic tones. Quite a number of us no doubt 
have undergone, with varying emotions, the ex- 
perience foisted upon us by the "comedian" who 
played a well-known tune on the piano with vio- 
lent and dissonant lapses from the pitch; a sim- 
ilar effect naturally results from a misinterpre- 
tation of the Indian's meaning. By changing the 
interval of any song well-known to us we can 
make a caricature of it. It is therefore a plain 
duty on the part of the student who aims to in- 
vestigate and make a record of the Indian music 
hereabouts to bear these facts in mind. 

Prof. Fillmore's conclusions, expressed shortly 
before his death, was that "folk-melody, every- 
where, the world over, is harmonic melody; it has 
a key-note or Tonic, and tends to move along the 
line of the Tonic chord, adding afterwards the 
tones which belong to the chords most nearly 
related to the Tonic. These are no other than the 
tones which make up our major and minor dia- 
tonic scales. In some of these races the tendency 
appears to be strong to add to the Tonic chord 
only the second and sixth of the major scale, some- 
times laying the principal stress on the first and 
sometimes on the sixth (do and la). In the for- 
mer case the key is major and in the latter minor. 
The same tones are used for both keys and the 
question of key is simply a question of the loca- 
tion of the center of gravity. These five-toned 
scales are not only exceedingly common as a basis 
for the old Scotch and Irish folk-songs, but almost 
equally so for peoples so widely separated as the 
Omaha Indians, the African negroes and the Chi- 
nese. 

Jl Jl Jl 

The first Saengerfest of the Pacific Coast will be 
held in this city on October 21-22. The meeting- 
place has not yet been determined upon, as final 
arrangements have not yet been completed. The 
Licderkranz of this city, and those of Pasadena 
and of Riverside will take part. Three mass 
chorus numbers will be given and the individual 
clubs will contribute selections under their own 
directors. Following the plan in vogue on the 
Atlantic Coast, the conductor in the city where the 
Fest is to be held will be the principal conductor, 
so that in this instance, Prof. A. J. Stamm will 
have charge of the massed chorus work. The 
plan to be carried out embraces a Sing-fest on the 
evening of October 21st, at which an elaborate pro- 
gram will be presented, and a "Summer Night 
Fete'" on the next evening, when a greater freedom 
will be allowed. Assurances have been received 
from the Arion Liederkranz of San Francisco that 
a large delegation from that club will be present, 
and many contribute numbers. As this movement 
is initiatory of a Pacific Coast Saengerfest on the 



Western Graphic 



plan of that so successful in the Eastern States, 
where thousands of singers join in chorus, it is 
hoped to make this the nucleus for an undertak- 
ing which eventually will take the same import- 
ance on the coast as it has now beyond the 
Rockies. In order to strengthen the movement, 
which means much for the cause of music, all 
singers with even a smattering of German should 
assist, and those who are not of Teuton proclivi- 
ties can easily follow the text which accompanies 
the "universal language." A spirit of goodfellow- 
shlp animates these German singing clubs and a 
close and most commendable interest was inva- 
riably shown at all the preparatory rehearsals 
which I have attended. The program will be an 
entertaining one, and the wider the scope this 
movement can be given the more important will 
it be in its material sense, to the city, as it will 
bring visitors here from all parts ol the State. 
In the clubs of New York, Baltimore, Cincinnati. 
Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Louis a large propor- 
tion of the membership is American or rather 
English-speaking, and I trust that such of our men 
as can sing will aid with their voices and by their 
good-will a movement that means much to the 
expansion of the musical spirit in not only this but 
contiguous communities. E. F. KUBEL. 

Prof. Morrison and wife leave next week for a 
vacation at San Diego. This is the first time in 
four years that Prof. Morrison has closed his 
studio doors, and he looks forward to the two 
weeks as those of unalloyed pleasure. 

& 

Owen Foster, organist, and Perry M. Parker 
leave Monday for a month at San Diego. 

j» 

The Graphic office was startled from a somnolent 
end-of-the-week feeling last Saturday afternoon by 
a halloo from the street in front of the editorial 
rooms, the tone being somewhere between A flat 
and the hubbub of a riot. Investigation proved 
the individual to be a man of fierce mien, with 
mustachios a la militaire, sans beard, and seated 
in a mammoth camp wagon, holding the reins over 
a pair of sturdy-looking horses, the ensemble 
strongly suggesting "Pike's Peak or Bust" or some 
equally pertinent phrase of the days of '49. Closer 
scrutiny disclosed the identity of the man, who 
was none other than the hero of three oratorios, 
Prof. F. W. Bacon, just returned from a month 
in the mountains back of San Bernardino. Prof. 
Bacon evidently had not heard of Fitzgerald's 
Jack-rabbit, for ho regaled the open-mouthed 
scribes and artists with thrilling incidents of 
squirrel shooting and trout fishing. By the way, 
it occurred to the practiced eye of the artist that 
the Professor's arms have stretched several inches 
through illustrating his fish stories — he should 
carry a couple of old batons along with him, 
which would add credibility and indicate a tendency 
to exactness on the musician's part if graduated 
to inches. A good time? One need only look at 
the rich brown color in his face and note the added 
sparkle to his eye to answer the question. 

:< :* :< 

Mrs. Lucia M. Burnett, the pianist, Miss Bur- 
nett, and Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Turner have taken 
a cottage at Terminal Island tor the season. Mrs. 
Uurnett is fast recovering from the debility of a 
winter's hard study in Chicago and will take up 
active work early in the fall. 

Mr. William Sherwood, probably the leading 
piano teacher in the United States, is to make a 
tour of California this winter. 

3 :* :* 

Owen Foster is at work on a new opera, as yet 
unnamed. Miss Grace Bowers has already finished 
the libretto, the scene of which, as in "La Fiesta," 
is laid in California; time, "the days of old, the 
days of gold, the days of '49." The heroes will 
wear the flannel shirts and big revolvers of the 
early miner. Of course, they will have other 
clothes as well. Joaquin Murietta, the bandit 
whose name was so notorious, will appear on the 
boards, a real heavy villain. Mr. Foster is wildly 
enthusiastic over the plot, even in this warm 
weather, and is anxious to finish the score. He 
claims to have no designs on the Grau Opera 
Company. 

■!* S v< 

Jean de Reszke, one of the few great singers who 
mingles brains with his work and consequently 
gives some dramatic meaning to the characters 
he represents, expresses himself in a most inter- 
esting manner in regard to Wagner's music. 

"Wagner is to me such a genius," he said, "that 
his works have become for me symbols of the 
great emotions of life. Music seems to my mind 
represented eternally in 'Die Meistersinger,' relig- 
ion is in 'Parsifal' and 'Lohengrin' figures mysti- 
cism for all time. 'Tristan und Isolde' stands for 
suffering, 'Siegfried' is poetry, and remembrance 
is the great impression of 'Gotterdammerung.' No 
opera of Wagner stands for love. Love for Wag- 
ner does not exist, according to my understanding 
of him, and I will give you my reason for thinking 
so. Love with Wagner is always a dream of suf- 
fering. He never unites two beings of the same 
kind, of the same sphere. We know always in the 
midst of his beautiful harmonies that this love 
cannot endure. In 'Lohengrin' he gives us a su- 
perhuman being united to Elsa, In 'Die Meister- 
singer' a grand seigneur pays court to the niece 
of a shoemaker, in 'Tristan and Isolde' two beings 



are intoxicated by the influence of a drink, in 'Die 
Walkure.' a brother and sister feel an abnormal 
love, cut short by death. In 'Siegfried' the same 
difference is to be noted in the natures of the two 
lovers. One is mortal and the other a goddess. 
It is present in 'Tannhauser' to a slighter extent. 
A man possessed by Venus and fascinated by her, 
falls in love with a pious saint. In 'Der Fliegende 
Hollander' the daughter of a sailor is loved by a 
legendary being." 

When Reymini. the famous violinist, was a 
young man. he was engaged by a parvenu to play 
at a dinner, the agreement stating that he was to 
furnish music from eight o'clock to eleven. He 
began with an Andante movement from Mozart, 
a composition which opens very slow and soft. 
The host turned to his guests. "That's just like 
those musicians," he said. "I hired him by the 
hour, and see how slow he plays." 

.< ■* :< 

The New York correspondent of our leading 
daily contemporary makes the startling annouce- 
ment, "There has recently left New York for her 
summer home in Missouri, a pianist of extraor- 
dinary talent and perfect education; having been 
taught by virtuosos to royalty." Poor thing, and 
she is yet alive! "Her personality, the only 
source of art. transfuses itself into her music, and 
produces a surprising effect upon her audience, 
making them generous in spontaneous applause." 
If this scribe continues to "transfuse" us with 
such huge chunks of his "personality," the effect 
upon our said local contemporary will indeed be 
surprising. It will simply mean insurrection, an- 
archy and horrible death to that eagle bird. And 
to think that Los Angeles may be visited by this 
pupil of "virtuosos to royalty!" 

t .4 jH 

Miss Ada Showalter has been engaged as organ- 
ist at the Trinity M. E. Church, South, for the 
month of August, to supply the place of the regu- 
lar organist, who will be away on vacation. 

\^ t$ t$ 

Mr. Frank H. Colby has severed his connec- 
tion, as musical director and organist, with 
the Independent Church of Christ. Mrs. Colby, 
who filled the position of solo soprano at the same 
church, also retires. The successors of Mr. and 
Mrs. Colby, are Miss Blanche Rogers, organist, 
and Miss Mollie Adelia Brown, soprano, the other 
members of the choir remaining. Mr. Colby has 
been the organist at Simpson Auditorium for a 
peiiod covering more than half a decade, during 
which time three different church organizations 
have occupied the building. Simpson M. E. church, 
the Church of the Covenant, under the pastorate 
of Rev. Burt Estes Howard, and the present Inde- 
pendent Church of Christ, Rev. J. S. Thomson, 
pastor. Although Mr. Colby ceases to be organ- 
ist and director of music of the new church, he will 
continue his studio at Simpson Auditorium as 
heretofore and will have the use of the organ for 
lessons and the practice of his pupils, among whom 
are several bright ai.d very promising students, 
whose work at the recent organ recital reflected 
great credit unon their teacher. 

„•* ,< ■.•* 

Wesllakt Park 

Westlake Park, Sunday, 2:30 p. m.: 

Grand march. "The Advance Guard" S. Smith 

Waltz, "The Nightingale" Czlbulka 

Overture, "Comique" .r Keler-Bela 

Dance caprice, "Little Egypt" Bergenholtz 

Patrol, "The British" Asch 

Medley overture, "The Butterfly" Beyer 

Porto Rican dance, "Rosita" Missud 

Selection, "Martha" Flotow 

Coon medley, "Ragtime" Mackie 

War songs, "The Hoys in Blue" Laurendeau 

* ..«* 
Hollenbeck Park 

Hollenbeck Park, Sunday evening, 7:30 p. m.: 

March. "Under Fire" Russell 

Bridal chorus from "Lohengrin" R. Wagner 

Melodie, "Angels Serenade" Braga 

Characteristic, "The Village Band" P. Gaunt 

Overture, "La Souveraine" A. Herman 

Selection, "Ernani" Verdi 

Waltz, "Love's Thoughts" Arthur Pryor 

Medley. Popular Songs Beyer 

Ragtime Potpourri Mackie 

"Songs of '04" arr. Laurendeau 

Green and yellow Traction cars run direct to 
park. 

Disgusted with men — A young man who has 
tried two months of soldier life writes home to 
tell how he misses the society of women: "Fellow 
citizens, if you want to appreciate a woman get 
away from her. You don't know what the Cre- 
ator did when he performed the first surgical 
operation on Adam. If you want to know what a 
grand, glorious and sugar-coated thing a woman 
is Just join the army as I did. See nothing but 
men from morning to night. Join the army and 
loaf with men, eat with men, talk with men, help 
men, carry men, walk over men, succor men, see 
men, men, men, and nothing but men, live In a 
perpetual atmosphere of profanity; at the end of 
three weeks you would be passionately enamored 
with the mummy of an Egyptian servant girl, and 
give her an electrical kiss that would burn three 
thousand years of dried hide Into flushed and vel- 
vety animation" 



MUSIC AND ART ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 

\ on i: 

< OM POSITION 
THKOKV 



Phone Main ss.'» 



230 M k i i.man Block 



ARNOLD 



K R A U S S 



SOLOIST AMI VIOLIN TKACIII K 

Pupil ot Cesar Thomson 
Studio: 807 W. Seventh st. Tel. Oreeu 1558 



HARLEY 



HAMILTON 



CONCERT violinist ami TKACHKB 
Ensemble playing a specialty. 
Musical Director [<0I Angeles Theatre. 
Pupil of Emile Sauret, Loudon, and SlmoneUI, London. 

Htudlo, 320-321 Blanchitnl Building 



CHARLES F. EDSON 

BASSO CANTANTK 

Kngngements Accepted for 

Concert, Oratorio Studio 
AND Opera ... 611 WITMEK STREET 

Telephone James 78 



MORTON F. MASON 

Teacher of IMmio, Orgnn and Harmony 

Organist Pasadena Presbyterian Church 
Studio: Blanchard building Residence: 250 State Street 

Los Angeles Pasadena 



MISS MIRIAM B. BARNES 

Piano Soloist and Teacher of the 1'lano 

Pupil of 

Herr Thllo Becker 253 SOUTH GRAND AVE 

MRS. LUCIA M. BURNETT 

PIANO SOLOIST AM) TKACI1KK 

Pupil Wm. Sherwood, Chicago 100B W. Washington St. 

CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

HARMONY COUNTERPOINT 
COMPOSITION VIOMV 

Studio Tajo Block, cor. 1st .t Brd'y Residence 632 Burlington 

MRS. J. M. JONES 

TEACH K IC OK THE HAKP 

Address care of So. Cal. Music Co. RESIDENCE: 
216 W. Third St., I.os Angeles Lincoln pMrl. 



MADAME MARIE HUNI 

TKACIIKIt OK HINGING 

Classical Music a Specialty. 
Studio, 628 S. Hill Street lx)s Angeled 

D. H. MORRISON 

VOICK i i I i i • I NG 

77 and 78 Potomac Block Los Angeles. Cal. 



MISS MAUDE PRIEST 

GUITAR LESSONS 
Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution, Rapid Progress 
Pupil M. S. Arevalo STUDIO: 4'>2J4 So: Broadway 

Room 25 



A. 



WILLHARTITZ 



rhino, Harmony, Com poxM Ion , Ktc. 
Los ANG ELKS 311 BLANCHARD MUSIC and ART BLDO. 

EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN AND (ill IT A K 
STUDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall 
Mornings at Pasadena Dlrcctoi Throop Institute 

Afternoons at I.os Angeles Mandolin and Guitar (,'luh 

ROLLA E. GARDN E~R 

IIAN.IO, M ANDOLIN, GUITAB 

String Orchestra Siumo. 244 South Hill St 



Blanchard Hall Sir 

Building devoted to Music and Art. 

Auditorium, scaling 800, can be engaged for Music 
ales. Receptions, Lectures, Dunces, etc. 

Rehearsal ami l ecture Rooms for rent. 

Forty Htudlos— single and en suite. 

Public Art (iallcry o|>en dally, 1 to 4 p. m. 
For any Information apply to 

F. W. BLANCHARD 



( LADI ES 



Have your Freckles Removed " 

ByU " nfftl,u Original Freckle Salve # 

PREPARED ONLY BY A 

O. F\ HEINZE/VAAN 

■M North CIIKMIST 

Main Street Vr#> Price SO Ct 



it*, i 



To the Deaf 

A /ich lady, cured of her deafness and noises In 
the head by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drums, 
Rave $100,000 to his Institute, so that deef people 
unable to procure the Ear Drums, may have them 
free. Address No. 532c, The Nicholson Institute, 
780 Eighth Avenue, New York. 6-7-01 



8 Western Graphic 

An Elderly Golfer 

By Abbott Foster ^ ^ 



A White Ball perches on a Pinch of Earth; 
The Golfer smites for All that he is Worth; 

Not then ensues an Awe-inspiring Drive; 
But a weak Foozle, proper r ood for Mirth. 

This is not splitting Hocks, nor felling Trees; 
No bull-like Fury, but deliberate Ease, 

Displays the Adept, while he does his Holes, 
Not in your Nines and Eights, but Fours and 
Threes. 

Sweet is the Click that follows Stroke exact; 
Vile is the Sound whenever Top is smacked; 

With Teeth on Edge the Duffer sees his Flub, 
Cry to the Worlu that Sense and Skill he lacked. 

A steady Glare, with all thy Heart and Soul, 
Fix on the Ball, till smitten toward the Goal. 

The Eye that wavers brings a heavy Curse; 
Striking, squint never sidelong at the Hole. 



Vain is the Pomp of Jacket blazing Red; 
Of yellow Shoes to chequered Stockings wed; 

Of shiny Clubs, and parti-colored Hose; 
Of tartan Cap upon an alien Head. 

Me fares no better who is thus arrayed; 
His shame is greater when i.e low is laid, 
By Youth, in shabby Raiment, whose strong 
Will, 

By Eye and Hand and Club must be obeyed. 

Why such a Pother o'er a paltry Game? 

Why trudge long Miles on Miles, and call by Name 

On all your Gods? for nothing but to find, 
That Out and Back in Eight Score Strokes you 
came? 

Better sit snugly in some Quiet Place; 
Forswear the Pastime of the Scottish Race. 

Life is too short to spend it on the Links: 
Ye are not young, and Death speeds on apace. 

— Abbott Foster in April Golf. 



«*««*««««««*« «VVVVVVAAVV*VVVVV**«V«VVV**««*VV%*VVV*V»V«VV«VVVV««V>VVVV 

Little Ah Sirvg's Rorrva_nce 



By 



Miss 



May 



Waters 



AH SING was from the Celestial Kingdom, 
as his name would imply, but he was 
not a "heathen Chinee," for, adorning the 
walls of his little laundry were many Scriptural 
texts that had been given him at the Christian 
church where he went every Sunday afternoon, 
dressed in his handsome purple brocaded sacque, 
loose broadcloth trousers and dear little white- 
soled slippers. 

Ah Sing felt himself to be quite an American 
citizen, for he had been in New York seven years, 
spoke English intelligently, and was doing a thriv- 
ing business. He had, like all his countrymen, the 
bead-like eyes and dusky skin, and was small of 
stature, but there was such honesty and simplicity 
in his expression that it helped to win him a 
steady patronage. 

Now, little Ah Sing's heart had become Ameri- 
canized also, and it was very susceptible to female 
loveliness; many times he would, apparently, be 
counting over collars and cuffs brought to him by 
some of his fair customers, yet silently giving 




Proceeded to Price Some of the Dainty Bric-a-Brac 

homage to the pretty faces that for the moment 
brightened his shop. 

One clear summer day Ah Sing had taken the 
time to write a letter to one of his fellow-country- 
men living in Washington when a young girl en- 
tered the door and proceeded to price some of the 
dainty bric-a-brac kept for the ornamentation of 



his window. She was not beautiful, but there 
was a certain attraction about her that made Ah" 
Sing long to give her the article she admired. 
Her complexion was so healthy, her hair and eyes 
so brown, her voice so sweet and gentle that when 
she spoke Ah Sing was so fascinated he almost 
forgot to reply. 

She purchased a cup and saucer and as Ah Sing 
was getting the change his glance fell upon the 
letter he had been writing. 

"Will the young lady write here?" and he point- 
ed to the envelope, for he was a poor penman and 
it seemed that here was a chance to get his letter 
directed and to keep that bright face a little longer 
in his shop." 

"Why, certainly I will," and she took the pen 
and copied the address from a slip of paper, then 
after a friendly smile at Ah Sing's stuttering 
thanks, she left the place. 

After she had gone the little fellow gazed upon 
the writing with tenderness and instead of send- 
ing the envelope and letter upon its way, he put it 
safely in an old wallet and the letter was never 
sent. 

Many times the same young girl came to the lit- 
tle laundry and bought Chinese curios of the own- 
er, and she always said something pleasant to him, 
but she did not know that when she left Ah Sing 
would go to his wallet, take out an envelope, look 
at the writing tenderly, and lovingly put within it 
the money she had given him; and as he ironed 
and ironed all day and a great part of the night, 
he could not whistle and sing, he could only think 
of the brown eyes that glanced at him so kindly, 
and the sweet, soft voice that spoke to him and 
he was very happy with these memories for com- 
pany. 

Summer passed and still Ah Sing's heart was 
loyal to his little lady. Often she came; sometimes 
with friends and sometimes alone, and he tried to 
keep a varied stock, so they would always have 
something new to select from. 

It was of her he was thinking this morning as 
he wended his way through a crowded thorough- 
fare to the importers, to obtain a fresh supply 
of goods; and in his imagination he saw her 
brown eyes sparkle with admiration at the pretty 
things he expected to have to show her. 

Yes, of her he was thinking, when he saw, com- 
ing toward him, the object of his thoughts, and 
she gave him one of her pleasant smiles. She 
looked so sweet and fair, so much a part of the 
bright day, but she was accompanied by a good- 
looking young man, and all at once the day lost 
its brightness for little Ah Sing. 

He stood still a moment, and then, before he 
realized it he began to retrace his steps and foT- 
low them; they were chatting gayly. 



He came closer until not more than two or 
three yards away, they were all approaching one 
of those 12-story buildings that of late are being 
erected in New York and termed 'sky-scrapers." 
This one was only a frame work of masonry as 
yet. 

A shriek came from some one near the top of 
the structure, Ah Sing looked up to see, to his 
horror, that a tremendous block of marble had 
become loosened from the derrick and seemed tot- 
tering on edge, the next instant, down — down — 
and the young girl directly beneath it. 

She was bewildered by the cry and gazed round, 
unconscious of the danger. 

Love was even quicker than the fall of that 
massive stone. Ah Sing sprang forward, gave the 
girl a powerful push, he had not time to tell her or 
draw her away, and she was safe. Her companion 
had seen the danger, but self-preservation was, 
to him, the first law of nature. 

But, alas! pinned beneath the huge block was 
little Ah Sing, who had sacrificed his life to save 
that of the girl he had long and silently wor- 
shiped. 

A crowd soon gathered, the stone was moved 
and the mangled form was takeh to Belevue Hos- 
pital. There he lingered several hours in great 
agony, but he could bear it, for when he aroused 
after being laid on the cot, she stood by his side 
and her hands bathed his face and her tears 
soothed his last hour. Thus Ah Sing died, looking 
into her dear face. 

One week after the terrible accident, the young 
girl whose life had been saved received a visit 
from the surgeon who had attended Ah Sing. 

"I come to you by the hasty request of Ah 
Sing," he said. "He has given me authority to 
dispose of the laundry and other property and use 




The Day Lost its Brightness for Little Ah Sing 

the money realized toward a fund that has been 
started to educate the Chinese in New York. But 
all the bric-a-brac he wishes given to you, with 
his prayers for future happiness and that you will 
sometimes think of him. This wallet is to be put 
in your hands by me." After a few trivial re- 
marks the physician took his leave. 

The brown eyes were again dimmed with tears 
when she saw in the wallet, among some papers 
marked with hieroglyphics she could not under- 
stand, an envelope with her own handwriting up- 
on it which she did understand. 

For her had beaten a heart as strong and brave 
as that of any knight of old, she was more than 
life to little Ah Sing, so he gave it up for her. 

Li Hung Chang, who does not believe in repub- 
lics, said once in discussing governments: "Five 
thousand years ago China was a republic, just as 
the United States is today." "What made you 
change your form of government?" he was asked. 
"The change," he said, "was the most gradual in 
the world, and our first emperor was a plowboy." 

When Li was in Germany, the Kaiser asked 
him, "How do our women compare with those of 
China?" "I really cannot te.i," said Li, slyly, fas- 
tening his eyes on the corsage of a lady who was 
present. "We never see half as much of our 
women as you do of yours." 

(Copyrighted 1900.) 



Western Graphic 
15he Woman of the Century 



NEVER in the history of the world has there 
been even a passing interest in the person- 
nel of the government of China beyond Li 
Hung Chang and possibly a few others of the 
prominent Chinese who have visited other coun- 
tries. But with the coming of the troubles in the 
far East every one is interested in the personali- 
ties and history of that remarkable nation, when 
the attention can be concentrated upon the be- 
wildering names of the principal actors in the 
great drama that has just begun. Of Prince Tuan, 
whose ups and downs of late, according to the 
newspapers, have been as the hour hand of the 
clock, but little is known, and even his relation 
with the ruling house is not certain. Some say 
that he is a brother of the old Emperor, whose un- 
fortunate choice of a favorite slave-girl harnessed 
the late Dowager on the Empire; others make him 
a cousin. Of the Empress Dowager, Tsu Tsi, 
quite the most remarkable woman of the nine- 
teenth century, more is known, although much 
of the devious way of her life is hidden in the 
dark state secrets of the Pekin Court. It is a 
bloody record, complete with the commission of 
every crime in the Christian Decalogue and its 
Chinese equivalent. 

It is romantic enough at the outset. Such of 
us as were brought up on Sunday-school period- 
icals in our tender childhood remember that one 
of the worst offenses charged against the black- 
ness of Chinese heathendom was the sale of in- 
fants as slaves in time of famine. It was in the 
great famine of 1831 that a Manchurian noble in 
reduced circumstances, being in the last extremity 
of want, sold his pretty seven-year-old daughter 
as a slave at Canton. The slave was Tsu Tsi Tsu 
An, afterward Empress regent of China. Just 
what her antecedents were, it is not exactly 
known; like many a social struggler in another 
sphere, the Chinese imperial lady has tried to let 
the world lose memory of her ancestry. The fact 
that her father was a Manchurian noble amounts 
to little. Among the governing Manchus, as the 
Cascons, practically everyone is noble. The rumor 
that she had an immediate English ancestor is per- 
sistent, although confirmed by no immediate proof, 
and is borne out by the fact that she is lighter in 
skin and more prominent of features than most 
Celestials. 

But whatever her antecedents, she passed into 
bondage at the age of seven with no apparent dif- 
ference from the tnousands upon thousands of 
slave children sold in the year of the Great Fam- 
ine. Her master was a Canton merchant, and it is 
recorded that he treated her with great kindness — 
a strange beginning for her career of blood and 
slaughter. As she grew larger, she developed 
some of the beauty which served, in her career, 
to pave the way for the play of her brains. There 
she lived, and was the favorite of her master un- 
til she was seventeen. At that time the Empe- 
ror Hsien Fung, following the Chinese custom, 
issued a proclamation calling upon the daughters 
of Manchuria to present themselves at the palace 
in order that concubines might be chosen for the 
imperial harem. With her eye always on the main 
chance, little Tsu Tsi playeu for the opportunity 
to enter the competition. So well did she do her 
part as to pursuade her master that the advan- 
tages he would gain by having a friend at court 
would outweigh the loss of a favorite slave, and 
in the end he not only gave full permission, but 
bought the needful costumes and accessories. She 
won easily, and was installed in the Emperor's 
household. 

The household of the Chinese Emperor is no ex- 
ception to the other Oriental harems with respect 
to the intrigues which go on therein. Yet, even 
at her early age, Tsu Tsi went rapidly ahead, ob- 
taining the Emperor's special favor before she had 
been there two years. But the chief beauty of her 
game, the crowning touch of art is the fact that 
she obtained her access to the Emperor through 
the Empress herself. The latter was childless, 
and the throne needed an heir. It was the little 
Manchurian girl who was chosen to become its 
mother. And when she gave the Emperor a son, 
she was fairly launched upon her career. 

While this heir was still a young child, in 1860, 



the old Emperor died of indigestion. There was 
no autopsy, and only a vague hint that the soft 
yellow hand of Tsu Tsi was in the matter. In the 
light of subsequent events, however, the oppor- 
tuneness of Hsien Fung's death becomes signifi- 
cent. Since 1860, at every difficult crises in Tsu 
Tsi's affairs death has most fortunately stepped 
in to put the person most impeding her progress 
out of the way. The fact that her son was the 
next heir, and that the sooner he began to reign 
the longer the regency would be, may assist to a 
correct diagnosis of Hsien Fung's malady. In any 
event, his death took place, and very soon the 
small boy was proclaimed Emperor under the 
title of Tung Chi, with the Dowager Empress and 
mother Empress appointed coregents. 

Things moved smoothly for a time after this. 
The junior regent took pains not to show herself 
too dominant, but hers was, in fact, the strong 
hand of the pair. It was towards the end of the 
Emperor's minority that his mother noticed cer- 
tain unpleasant signs of independence. Tung Chi 
attained his majority, however, and was duly pro- 
claimed Emperor, and the regency ended. 

Had Tsu Tsi been an ordinary woman, this 
would have closed her career. She had climbed 
higher than any other Oriental woman since the 
time of the Zenobia; it was for her to rest on her 
laurels and round out her life in the luxury of a 
pampered harem- woman. Apparently, she did 
this; really, she was waiting and watching, like a 
spider. The opportunity came, — perhaps she made 
it— who knows? An alarming rumor that the Em- 
peror's health was failing spread rapidly. The re- 
gents who had proved themselves efficient before 
were summoned again to take the reins of state. 
Within a month the youthful Emperor became, as 
his subjects were piously informed, "a guest on 
high.'' But the Government was saved, for the 
Empresses were in full authority. Tung Chi had 
married a young wife not long before his death, 
and as she was about to become a mother, it was 
supposed that if she bore a son he would naturally 
be proclaimed the heir of his father. Perhaps Tsu 
Tsi feared the chance of another Empress Dow- 
ager. At any rate, for reasons best known to her- 
self, she seated upon the throne a new Emperor in 
the person of Kwang Su, a young son of a brother 
of the old Emperor, Hsien Fung. Her choice was 
a direct violation of ancestor-worship, the most 
sacred Chinese tradition, since the new Emperor 
belonged to the same generation as his prede- 
cessor, whose ghostly self could, therefore, never 
receive the homage of a living ruler. The perma- 
nence of this arrangement was assured by a mys- 
terious and convenient illness wliich fen upon the 
widow of the late Emperor and carried her off, 
together with the unborn babe. 

After this, there were no mysterious illnesses in 
the ruling Manchu family until 1881. This was, 
chiefly, because no person of consequence arose to 
oppose the triumphant Tsu Tsi. For in conse- 
quential persons, she had the headsman— poison, 
in her scheme of government, was for the mighty 
of the earth. Put in 1881, there was some friction 
between the old Empress the senior regent, and 
her junior colleague, Tsu Tsi. The senior promptly 
died of heart failure, leaving Tsu Tsi to rule alone 
until the young Emperor should attain his major- 
ity. When he had reached that age, the air of 
Pekin became, very suddenly, too strong and ma- 
lignant for Kwang Su, and his health failed, so 
that the Dowager had to be called out of her re- 
tirement to assume the yoke of government. She 
did this at once, but the Emperor's health con- 
tinued to fail. The thing which kept him alive 
at all was not the. skill of the Chinese physicians 
summoned from near and far nor that of the Eu- 
ropean doctors. It was the declaration of the For- 
eign offices that, if the young ruler died, they 
would demand a strict investigation. Then came 
the short period when, by some mysterious means, 
the Emperor and his progressive advisers got con- 
trol of things. Their triumph was short, for by 
means equally mysterious the old fiend regained 
her supremacy, imprisoned the ruler, forced him 
to abdicate and set the young child of Prince Tuan 
upon the throne. 

After that the Boxer uprising, in which the Em- 
press most certainly had a hand, came along to 
complicate matters and to drop a veil of obscurity 
over the stage upon which the drama of Chinese 
history is being enacted. The truth of affairs in 
the capital is as deeply hidden as sensational cor- 
respondence can hide, but it now seems that the 
force which he turned loose became too great for 
her to control, or that she waited too long before 
causing indigestion to develop in the father of her 
puppet-Emperor. 



GARDENING 
^CALIFORNIA 




156 PACES 
1M.USTKA ' I> 

KMHOSSKD : : 
PAPBB : : : : 
covers : : : 



*X»HE ONLY WORK 
* ever written for this 
soil and climate; entirely 
non technical and espe- 
cially adapted to amateurs. 
Heretofore sold at 50 CCtttS, 
will be reduced to close 
out an edition to 

25 Cents 

and three cents postage. 



AT ALL 
BOOK STORKS 



GEO. RICE & SONS, Zh< 

311-313 
New High St. 
LOS ANUELES, CAL 



YOU SHOULD GO TO 

CAMP 
CORONADO 

. . . The Society Center of the Pacific 
Coast. Reached in four hours from 
LOS Angeles on the regular trains or 
still quicker on the 

CAMP 
CORONADO FLYER 

I. i-ave I. os Angeles 7.0r> a. m. 

Arrive San Diego 10.45 a. m. 

Returning Special 

Leaves San Diego .5.10 p. in. 

Arrives Dos Angeles 8.50 p. in. 

Only passengers for Coronado Reach 
carried on this special. 

ROUND TRIP $4 00 

Ticket Office Second and Spring Sts. 



A Tempting 
Proposition 

TEN-CENT Oil. STOCK 

A hettcr one is a $2(00 Life Insur- 
ance for$15a year in the popular 

Order of The Iroquois 

incorporated under the law* of 
the State of New York. For par- 
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to T. M. CHAPMAN 

250 N. Union Ave., L. A. 





««)- Deputies make good pay. 
Several wanted for this territory. 

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Summer \ 
Man 

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g is as much of a necessity as the summer 

? ^irl, and needs a proportionate amount 

% of attention. See our novelty flannel 

5 negligee suits, as low as % I O.OO, and 

| all the fixings that go well with them. 

LONDON CLOTHING COMPANY f 

J HARRIS & FRANK, Pnops g 

117-125 North Spring Street | 

All We Ask is Comparison 

of Goods and Prices 

New Carpets and Rugs 

Hulls Hundreds of others and will suit you 

3x7 Shades only 45 Cents 

I. T. MARTIN ^''"sprino st 




Wheel Chain 
sold or rented 



Furs Htored, made to order and remodeled 
D. Bonoff, 247 S. Broadway, opp City Hall 




Cool and 

Pleasant 
Always 



AT 



HOTEL REDONDO 

JOS. H. BOHON, Manager 

"Tanned by Ocean Breezes" 




terminal 
Tsland 

Cong 
Beach 

Catalina 
Tsland 



No better places for Sea Bathing, Fishing 
Yachting and Boating on the Pacific 
Coast. Fine hotels, good boarding houses, 
Llegant camp grounds and pure water. 
Agents of the 

Los Angeles Terminal Railway 

Will sell you tickets and furnish all desired 
information. 

Excursion Rates frequent Trains 

City Ticket Othce, Sil So. Spring St., Los Angeles 
F. K. Rule, Cieu. Mgr. T. C Puck, (icu. Pass Aet. 

I pREE CAMP GROUND 

With Pure Mountain Water f 
* — at Avalon — w 

Santa Catalina 



Island 



Under conditions prevailing last year. Dozens 
of swift power launches for fishing and excur- 
sions. Tuna Club tournament now on. Free 
concerts by our famous band of 20 soloists. 
The best golf links. The aquarium, containing 
hundreds of living wonders of the deep. Boat- 
ing and bathing over Nature's most wonderful 
marine gardens, as seen at great depth through 
smooth transparent waters, with the many 
other natural advantages, permits Catalina to 
offer attractions for season of 1900 not possible 
at other resorts. Daily steamer service, Her- 
mosa running Saturdays and Sundays. Hotel 
Metropole always open. Take Southern Pa- 
cific or Terminal Ry. trains, leaving L. A. 
daily at 9:05 and 8:50 a. m., respectively. Fare 
round trip from Los Angeles, excursion $2.50; 
regular $2.75. 

BANNING CO. Sa^SS'gS: 

Telephone Main 36 

Hammam Turkish 

Russian or 5Qc 

210 South Broadway 
Los Angeles.... 



Western Graphic 
Where Cool Breezes Blow 

News and Gossip from the R^esorts 



AVALON— Harry Ellington Brook in his ram- 
bles through the Alps found that the 
thoughtful proprietors of the Swiss chalets 
had placed comfortable seats at lookout points 
through the mountains for the accommodation of 
guests and persons who might ramble that way. 
Being allowed to spend a few weeks yearly in 
rambling over Santa Catalina's rugged and pictur- 
esque hills, Mr. Brook suggested that the Swiss 
plan be emulated here and that seats be placed 
at commanding points on the hilltops about Ava- 
lon. The management of tue island took up the 
idea and benches have been placed at various 
points of vantage where the rambler may sit and 
rest and enjoy our home scenes and suroundings, 
which surpass any found in Switzerland's Alps. 

The golf links are working "overtime" these 
days, the players beginning early and staying late. 
It is quite remarkable what a hold the game takes 
on one once they begin to play. A case in point is 
that of Frank V. Rider, who represented the 
Santa Catalina Club at the Redondo tournament 
last week. Last year he was all fish. Six — I 
came near saying seven — days in the week he was 
out with rod and line tantalizing the finny denizens 



REDONDO— This is the season that maketh 
the hearts of seaside dwellers glad, and 
causeth the purse of the landlord to wax 
fat. Lo his shekels multiply and his gue.sts in- 
crease — and happy are they to be in the land where 
the sea breeze taketh the place of beer, and the 
face of the big sea answereth the angry frown of 
the sun. Selah! In other words, this is a good 
time to escape the heat of the interior by going 
to the beach, Redondo Beach, of course. Never 
was such a lively time as they have been having 
during the past week. People here by the hun- 
dred; big hotel full, and everything lively as the 
Belgian hare business. Last Saturday evening's 
dance was a hummer. Here are the names of a 
few who attended: Mr. and Mrs. William Prid- 
ham, Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Ainsworth, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. G. Nevin, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bohon, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. T. Bishop, Mr. and Mrs. Godfrey Holter- 
hoff, Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Porter, Mr. and Mrs. W. 
G. Young, Mr. and Mrs. William M. Van Dyke, 
Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Clark, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. 
Lovett, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Elliott, Mr. and Mrs. J. 
J. Melius, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Osburn, Mr. and 
Mrs. Robert Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Dunn. 




Tel. Green 427 



Open Day 
and Night 



Tlu- waves dashing over tin- Ocean Hon 

of the deep with a flying-fish. This year the 
days are all too short, and he worries the night 
through watching for the first faint rays of the 
dawn that he may get out and chase his little white 
ball over the hills, while his fishing rod is over- 
grown with moss. He plays to some purpose, how- 
ever, as he made the best gross score in the Re- 
dondo tournament. Apropos of this golf talk, the 
most important tournament of the year on these 
links will be held during the last week in Au- 
gust, continuing during the entire week. It will 
be an open handicap and annual contest for the 
Banning cup. There are now about one hundred 
golf and tennis players on the island and the 
courts and links are busy as beehives. 

A very delightful little entertainment was given 
in the ballroom of the Hotel Metropole Tuesday 
evening. Prof. Geo. A. Briggs, a nephew of Den- 
man Thompson of "The Old Homestead" fame, 
being the central figure in his character recita- 
tions. 

A real surprise was sprung in the audience when 
Mr. Andrews, of Phoenix, Arizona, began a vocal 
number. He is quite a young man and is blessed 
with a phenomenally fine baritone voice, strong, 
full, resonant, but withal as smooth as a moon- 
beam. H. Myer did a turn with his "Chicken 
song," "Chinese Song" and burlesque on Italian 
grand opera, each his own improvisation, that 
characterize him as a genius. There was a violin 
solo by Miss Edith Warner, dialect and other 
recitations by Miss Annie Adams, and a vocal solo 
by Mrs. Seager, all of which were finely rendered. 

The gay season has almost reached its zenith 
and the daily boats are still further augmenting 
the crowds here. This August will undoubtedly 
see the largest number of people on the island 
that has ever visited it at any time. 

There are a large number of society ladies at 
Santa Catalina and the ranks were further in- 
creased on Wednesday by the arrival of Mrs. How- 
ard M. Sale and Mrs. W. C. DeGroot. 



vard at Santa Barbara during a storm 

Mr. and Mrs. Glen Edmonds, Mr. and Mrs. Hub- 
bard, Mr. and Mrs. C. .1. Weir, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. 
Thoyse, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Denman, Mr. and Mrs. 
A. C. Balch, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Wilde; Mmes. J. 
H. F. Peck, John Corson, C. C. Carpenter, M. L. 
Sargent, Dan McFarland, W. T. Ball, L. T. Garn- 
sey, Wm. Bartling, Vermillion, Birdsell, Burks, A. 
,1. Jennings; Misses Louise McFarland, Grace Mc- 
Cormick, Nellie and Inez Clark, Jean Henderson, 
Eliza Bonsall, Seymour, May Corson, May Ridge- 
way, Gertrude Sargent, Hazel Hallett, Louise 
Bashford, Grace and Katherine Melius, Susie How- 
ard, Cope, Virginia Dryden, Mabel Garnsey, Jane 
Dorsey, Perry, Donna Felter, Burke, Ella Clark, 
Gertrude Mason, Higgins. Birdsell, Winder, Mat- 
tie Scott, Delano, Wood, Mary Babcock, Horn of 
St. Paul, Mullins. Ethel Mullins; Messrs. T. L. 
Craig. Hugh May, F. W. Burnett, G. B. Ellis, E. B. 
Tufts, H. B. Henderson, W. J. Wilson, B. F. Mans- 
field, T. A. Warren, L. C. Easion, F. Newman, R. 
D. Bronson, Charles Seyler, Jr., Fowler Shankland, 
C. F. Burke, S. M. Haskins, Warren Carhart, Karl 
Klokke. Birdsell, Earl Cowan, P. L. Winder, Le 
Grand Howell, Earl Lewis, W. R. Norris, W. G. 
Nevin, Jr., Herbert Anderson, Guy Corson, Allen 
Hancock, George Lawrence, Jr., F. J. Cram, Doug- 
las Burnett, C. F. Sutton, Percy South, M. L. Fish, 
A. O. Larkin, Thomas W. Haskins. 

Much interest has been centered in the gentle- 
men's billiard tournament, which has been going 
on during the week. Owing to the absence of one 
or two of the players the finales will be deferred 
until some time in the near future. The usual 
plunge party was enjoyed Monday evening, and 
several little informal affairs have passed the 
time by most pleasantly. 

The announcement that the Southwest Glee Club 
would give a concert Wednesday evening at the ho- 
tel brought out a large audience. The program 
was excellently rendered and much enjoyed by the 
guests. An impromptu tennis tournament was ar- 
ranged for Wednesday afternoon on the hotel 



Western Graphic 



1 1 



courts. Mrs. F. H. Seymour and Mr. Ivan Ander- 
son were the victorious contestants. The most en- 
joyable affair of the week was the informal dinner 
given at the pretty home of Col. and Mrs. F. H. 
Seymour Friday evening in honor of the hostess' 
birthday. The table decorations were of yellow 
and white cosmos gracefully arranged in tall cut 
glass vases. The guests were Mr. and Mrs. \V. G. 
Young, Miss Delia Clemmons, and Mr. Herbert An- 
derson. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ozro W. Childs, Mr. and Mrs. Nat 
Wilshire, Miss Emeline Childs and Miss Que'en of 
Covington, Kentucky, were a jolly party that 
lunched at the hotel last Sunday. 

Mr. L. C. Easton was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
W. G. Young at the hotel last Sunday. 

Mrs. Wesley Clark entertained Mrs. W. S. New- 
hall and Mrs. J. H. Utley with a luncheon at the 
hotel Tuesday. 

Miss Mary Babcock visited Mrs. Vermillion last 
week at the hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Pridham entertained Miss 
Melius and Miss Howard of Los Angeles last Sat- 
urday and Sunday. 

Miss Hazel Hallett, who has been visiting Miss 
Gertrude Sargent at her cosy cottage on the bluff, 
has returned to her home in ^os Angeles. 

TERMINAL ISLAND— I got awfully excited 
during the steam launch races last Sunday. 
I was lying on the beach under the awniirg 
by the wharf, and every time I would go off into 
a nice doze they would fire a cannon. The next 
time they have races I intend requesting Mr. Sum- 
ner (who always runs those sort of things) to 
make the signals with flags or something. But 
those who knew anything about it, and could tell 
which boat was ahead, said it was an interesting 
race and that the winner beat all tne rest. 

A friend of mine confided to me lately that she 
liked to go to Terminal because she never went 
home with a headache, as always happened when 
she visited other beaches. I thought maybe it 
had something to do with those Cuyamaca cattle 
cars the Terminal railroad borrowed for the Sun- 
day rush, but one of the wise old men at the Gor- 
don Arms tells me it is on account of the "lay of 
the land." At Terminal the beach faces the south- 
east so that during that part of the day when 
people like to enjoy the sand and water the sun is 
at one side or behind, preventing the glare from 
the water that is so conducive to headaches among 
many people. 

One of the new social features of the Island is 
the newly-organized Terminal Tennis Club, which 
met at Mr. Boothe's cottage Thursday evening to 
draft by-laws and elect the following directors: 
Messrs. Sterling, Boothe, Frank Rule, John York, 
Frank Widney, Misses Alice Eaton, Helen Boothe 
and Mrs. Walter Nordhoff. The court on the ocean 
front is completed and tournament is promised for 
some week during the season. "Over the back 
stop" may mean in the ocean, so delightfully sit- 
uated are the courts. 

DEL MONTE— It is expected that this meeting 
of the Pacific Coast Polo and Pony Racing 
Association, August 13-19, will be the most 
successful ever held. There will be two days' rac- 
ing, and the best polo and steeplechase horses in 
California will meet in the various events. Much 

PHYSICIANS AND SUKGKON9 



TITIAN JAMES COFFEY 



Hours— 10-12 a.m. 
2-4 p.m. 

306-308 WILCOX BUILDING Office Tel., Main 179 

Res. Tel., White 6011 Residence: 919 S. UNION AVE 

D. CAVE 

LANKERSHIM BLOCK 
126 West Third Street 



Tel. Main 1515 




rdova 

Candles 

Nothing adds bo mach 
to the charm of the drawing 
room or boudoir as the softly radi- 
ant light from CORDOVA Candles. 
Nothing will contribute more to tho 
artiKtic success of the luncheon, 
tea or dinner. The best decorative 
candles for the simplest or the 
most elaborate function — for cot- 
tage or manmon. Made in all colore 
and the roost delicate tints by 
BTANDAKD OIL CO. 
and sold everywhere. 



DRINK 



* 
* 

* 
* 

A Pure Mountain Spring J 
Crystal Water 



GLEN ROCK 



Main Offloe Newberry's Crystal Water » 
216 S. Spring St. * 

"Say, Mac. do you know where I can borrow a 
greyhound?'' 

"Borrow a greyhound! What on earth do you 
want to borrow a greyhound for?" 

"Oh, I just want to chase the hares off my face." 



interest centers in the mile race for thoroughbred 
ponies for the Del Monte cup. Mr. Hobart, Mr. 
Carolan and Mr. Raoul-Duval all have high class 
thoroughbred ponies, and some are expected from 
the southern counties. It will be a good pony that 
wins this race. There are two 3-mile steeple- 
chase events, one each day, over a very stiff 
course. 

In the Polo tournament there will be at least 
five teams. The players to enter from the different 
polo clubs of the State will be put in teams of equal 
strength, and the team winning the final event will 
receive the handsome trophy offered. All the best 
players in the State — Maude, Driscoll, Hobart, To- 
bin and others — will be seen in what promises to be 
the best polo tournament yet held in California. 
The Golf tournament for both men and women will 
be carried on in the morning of each day. 

A novelty in the sporting way this year will be 
the running of a public road coach over the 17- 
mile drive. Mr. Hobart's beautiful road coach "Del 
Monte" has been secured, and will be well horsed 
by the hotel stables. It will be driven by Mr. Ho- 
bart, Mr. Raoul-Duval, Mr. Beylard, Mr. Carolan 
and other well-known amateur whips. 

Music will be rendered by Bennett's Cornet Band. 
An exceptionally fine program has been arranged 
by Mr. George W. Bennett, director. Vocal music 
will be rendered by the Knickerbocker male quar- 
tet, and one or two other prominent soloists. 

1£^l 

SANTA MONICA— After all, our predictions 
were correct. The Times has given us the 
go-by, but we will have Sama Monica all 
to ourselves this month. People who have been 
flocking to the other beaches for various adver- 
tised attractions and diversions, will lanu here for 
their sure-enough resorting place. Where else 
than at Santa Monica can one find the delights of 
a real seaside resort, the fine beach, the glorious 
stretch of ocean, the pure salt air? Then, the new 
management of the Arcadia has excelled itself in 
placing its cuisine in the first rank, and the grum- 
blers at the menus of other seacoast hotels possess 
their souls in satisfaction as they rise from the 
bounteous numbers of the latest symposiums — of 
bills of fare. 

The leading people of Los Angeles society have 
now entered the Arcadia list of guests, and when 
they have been acquired what more can a hotel 
want to draw its all desired summer patronage. 

'Plaints have been frequent that Lieutenant and 
Mrs. Miner, who came on Monday, have retarded 
the social season in their delay of two weeks to 
make their first appearance, and the advent of 
these prominent young Angelenos and members of 
a prominent old California family is sure to bring 
large results in its train. We have waited for so- 
ciety and it has come — not to stay and dance and 
return but to habitate comfortably for the balance 
of the season. We had Senator White and Mrs. 
White for a short visit last week, to return later 
on, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Monroe came down on 
Saturday, and the Demenses of So. Grand avenue 
Los Angeles, arrived en familie on Tuesday, and 
every day brings its clientele of some prominent 
Angeleno to fill the ranks. 

Miss Rose Newmark, who by her sweetness and 
graciousness of manner, deserves to be the belle 
she is, was among the August first guests. She 
came down with her father and mother, Mr. and 
Mrs. M. J. Newmark, and intends to put in the 
season. Of all the popular maids' no one is more 
popular than the erstwhile Fieseta Maid and all- 
round capitvating bit of femininity. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Griffith are likewise hosts in 
themselves, whom all delight to honor, and who 
are the acquisitions to the Arcadia looked forward 
to today. 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Plater, Miss Waddilove 
and Mrs. Fulton, are also among the Saturday's 
arrivals; as are Mrs. Busch and Mr. and Mrs. John 
W. A. Off. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sale, leading a host, will come 
about the 10th. 

The beginning of gaitics brought to Santa Mon- 
ica are already influencing the social doings of the 
residents of the charming resort. Every day of 
this week had its own special bulletin of enter- 
tainment which would have given quite a different 
aspect to the stereotyped pastimes of the last few 
weeks, if all the best laid plans had not been un- 
fortunately set aside through the death of one of 
its special leaders and prime-movers — Mrs. Cap- 
tain Tomkinson. The Tomkinsons having been 
an old English family, and most of the social ele- 
ment of Santa Monica being also English, nearly 
all functions have naturally been suspended for 
the time. This is entirely the social standpoint. 
Taken from the view that Mrs. Tomkinson was 
not only a very charming and cultured society 
woman, but a very close and personal friend of 
most of the old and prominent residents of Santa 
Monica, her death is not felt as the deprivation of 
social gaities but as a genuine grief, in which one 
and all are in great sympathy. 

The Casino ball, or rather the first formal ball to 
be given at the Casino as an opening, under the 
auspices of the Santa Monica Golf Club, has 
been postponed from last evening until next 
Tuesday evening. The ball is looked forward 



to with special interest, as it is the first real 
"common" gaiety of Santa Monica and its sum- 
mer visitors. Perhaps "un-comnion" gaiety would 
have been a less misleading cognomen. At any 
rate the invitations for this dance are passing un- 
der careful scrutiny, and it is desired that it shall 
be delightful in every way to the participants. A 
great many cards have been sent out — Catalina 
and everywhere — and its goes without saying that 
a brilliant assemblage will be the result. 

The dance this evening at the Arcadia will per- 
haps have the best patronage it has yet had for, 
as already said, the "leaders" have come and is 
not society like the "ninety and nine" who wait 
for the commanders 

SANTA MONICA RESORTS 



f)otel Hrcadia 

Santa )VIomca 
by the sea 

finest Summer Resort on the pacific 

Elegant Hotel Elevator 
Electric Lights Orchestra 

SERVICE, TABLE, AND APPOINTMENTS 
UNEXCELLED 

Delightful, cool breezes from the ocean on 

warmest days. 
An ideal Summer Resort for those who wish 

to escape the heat of interior towns. 
The cleanest, smoothest and safest beach in the 

world. 

Surf bathing, boating, fishing, beautiful drives. 
Reached by S. P. R. R. trains and electric cars 

every half hour. Time from Los Angeles 

55 minutes. 
For rates and further information address 

W. E. ZANDER, Mgr. 



Ocean parfc^ p 

fiomes By the Sea 8o " tb 

' Santa (Montca 

Ocean front, Elegant beach. Water piped to tract, Electric ligh 
connection. Long lease, $10.00 to S '5.00 yearly rental The 
best opportunity ever offered lo secure a home on the beach 

Ocean Hir f& Ocean Beach 
Ocean Bathing 

Call on or address 

X. H. DUDLEY 

Corner Hill and Beach Streets 
Ocean Park 



Santa Monica 

will be more attractive this summer than 
before. There are No Saloons a New Club 
House for golf and tennis, a salt water 
Plunge filled daily and kept warm and 

many other things which ought to make it 
the best summer resort thi9 coming season. 
Address a letter to the North Beach Bath 
House Co. and we shall be glad to furnish 
you with all sorts of information about hotel 
rates, cottages, bathing, athletics or any- 
thing else you many desire to know. Let 
us help you locate this year. 



DAVIS M. CLARK 

REAL ESTATE, RENTAL AGENT 
I have a fine list of Cottages and Building Lots for sale 
or rent. The finest Beach on the Coast. 

1103 S. Second St., Oceanpark, 
At terminus of electric car tin L. A. C«., Cal. 



c. w. smith, President 



H. O. HAINES, Treasurer 



F. 0. ME I, TON, Secretary 

si?<? jslevu ^eptury Oil <?o. 

Has a total of ,W>:i acres of the choicest Oil Lands, situated 
In the very heart of the known and proven best producing 
districts. This Company will also manufacture, under U. a. 
patent 439,746, 

Gasoline, Kerosene, Sewing Machine Oil, 
Bicycle 011, Engine 011, Cylinder 011 
and Asphaltum 

Samples of all these can be seen at the Company's office. 
Subscriptions for stock will be received from 10 a m. to 5pm 
SHARES it* l.OO EmCH 



NEW CENTURY OIL COMPANY 

Telephone UREEN 564 108-1 09-1 10 StimSOn Blk. 



Oldest and Largest Bank In Southern California 

FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) »500,000 SURPLUS AND REHERVK 8926,742 
Total »1,426,742 

OFFICERS 

L W. HELLMAN President 

H. W. HELLMAN Vice-President 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

Q. HEIMANN Assistant Cashiei 

DIRECTORS 
W. H. Perry C. E. Thom A. Glassell 

O. W. Childs I. W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Van Nuys 
J. F. Francis H W. Hellman I. W. Hellman 

0~Speclal Collection Department. Our safety deposit depart 
ment offers to the public, safes for rent in its new fire and 
burglar proof vault, which is the strongest, best guarded 
and best lighted in this city. 



W. C. Patterson, President 
M. P. Green, Vice-Prest. 



W. D. Wooi.wine, Cashier 

E. W. Cok, Asst. Cashier 



THE LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL »500,000 SURPLUS and Undivided Profllts, $100,000 
United States Depositary 



Letters of Credit and Drafts issued available in all part* of 
the world. 

W. F. BOTSFORD, Presldeut J. G. MOSSIN. Cashier 

G. W. HUGHES Vioe-Pres. T. W. PHELPS, Ais't Cashier 

CALIFORNIA BANK 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



DIRECTORS: 



W. F. Hotsford G. W. Hughes R. F. Lotspelch 
W. H.Buruhain K. W.Jones W. S. Newhall 
Homer Laughlin I. B. Newton H. 0. Winner 

Capital Stock $250,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 35,000 

A General Banking Business transacted. 
Special attention given to Collections. 
Exchanges sold on all parts of the world. 



H. J. Wooi.lacott, President 
J. W. A. Off, Cashier 



R. H. Howell, 1st Vice Pres. 
Warren Gii.i.elen, 2nd V. P. 



STATE BANK & TRUST CO. 

Of Los Angeles. 

PAID-UP CAPITAI HALF MILLION DOLLARS 

DIRECTORS: 



R. H. Howell J. W A. Off 

H. J. Woollacott K. F. Porter 

J. A.Muir P. K. Rule 
Wm. M. Garland 



C. C. Allen 
A. W. Ryan 
Warren Gillelen 
1.. 0. Brand 



A General Banking Business transacted. Interest paid on 
Time Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes for rent 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

MAIN STREET SAVINGS BANK 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple Sts. Temple Block 

CAPITAL STOCK SUBSCRIBED $200,000 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUE President 

I. N. VAN NUYS Vice-President 

E. J. VAWTER, JR Cashier 

Directors— H. W. Hellman, Kasper Conn, H. W. O'Melveny 
L. Winter, O. T. Johnson, T. L. Duque, I. N. Van Nuys, W. G 
Kerckhoff, A. Haas. 



CHAS. B. PIRONI 

Sole Proprietor 



Located at West Glendale 
Los Angeles couuty 



West Glendale Winery and Vineyards 

Producer and Grower of 

High Grade Sweet and Table Wines 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TIME CARD 

Los Angeles and Redondo Ry. 

In EfTict June 3, 1900 

Depot: Corner Grand Avenue and Jefferson street 



Trams leave Us Angelas lor Redondo 
DAILY 


Trains leave Redondo lor las Angeles 

DAILY 


8.10 am 


7.00 am 


11.30 am 


10.00 am 


3.30 pin 


1.30 pm 


0.30 pm 


5.00 pm 


*12.00 Night 


*11.00 pm 



•Wednesdays and Saturdays only. 

Connecting with Grand avenue or Main and Jeflerson street 
cars at Los Angeles. City Office: 246 S. Spring at. Tel. M. 1031 

For rates on freight and passengers, apply lit depot, corner 
Grand avenue and Jefferson st. Los Angeles Tel. West I, 

See Santa Ke schedule, tickets interchangeable. 

L. J. Perry, Superintendent. 

The Pacific Coast Regalia Co. 

f\ . TENNANT GRAY 

""t;'":!" Military and Society Goods 



Western Graphic 
Odds 



End 



^ rx d 

Of Exhibits act the Exposition. 

By BEN. C. TRUMAN 



Flags, Banners, Badges, 
Uniforms and Swords 
Gold and Silver Trimmings 
Bmlllon Embroideries 



..no.. 

WEST SECOND STREET 



PARIS, France, July 19, 1900. 

THE great Exposition is at last in a perfect 
state of completion and is drawing about 
200,000 visitors week days and nearly 400,- 

000 Sundays. Sousa plays somewhere on the 
grounds each afternoon and evening, and whenever 
he plays great crowds assemble. I believe I have 
given your readers pretty full descriptions of all 
the salient features — the art palaces and other 
buildings, the Alexander 111 bridge, the Trocadero, 
the Esplanade des luvalides, La Tour Eiffel, Rue 
des Nations and Champ de Mars. I sometimes 
think I will tell you about what there is in the 
buildings. But that were truly impossible. Still, 

1 may hit upon some few things once in a while. 
For instance, I was invited by the German Com- 
missioner-General, Dr. Richter, to visit the pavil- 
ion erected for the use of the North German Lloyd 
Steamship Company and availed myself oi the in- 
vitation yesterday. The pavilion is situated at the 
foot of the Eiffel Tower, opposite the Palais de la 
Navigation de Commerce, and is a reproduction of 
the Rothesand-Leuchtturm at the mouth of the 
Weser, near Bremen. In the building an enormous 
globe, measuring 35 feet, occupies the center. This 
globe, which turns around its axis by electricity, 
shows the various lines of the North German Lloyd 
and other German steamship companies. Among 
the many very fine models distributed around the 
building a beautiful model of the record breaker. 
Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, is of special interest. 
On a large table on the ground floor are 127 dimin- 
utive models of the 245 vessels owned by the 
North German Lloyd, illustrating the dimensions 
of the ocean greyhounds as compared with the 
small Chinese coast steamers. A handsome model 
of the Lloyd office building in Bremen, showing 
the high tower, in which there is a Marconi wire- 
less telegraph station, by means of which the man- 
agers of this company will be enabled to communi- 
cate with their, steamers out at sea, occupies the 
center of this very interesting and beautiful ex- 
hibit. 

Jl J 

An interesting feature of the American section 
at the Exposition is the collection of gems and 
precious stones to lie presented by J. Pierpont 
Morgan to the American Museum of Natural His- 
tory. This collection is to be seen among Messrs. 
Tiffany and Co.'s exhibit, and includes a 22-carat 
Wisconsin diamond, another of three carats, rare 
blue and colored sapphires of Montana, a GO-carat 
green tourmaline gem from Haine. The pearls are 
beautiful, and a fine group of pearls attached to 
their shell are conspicuous. Mr. George F. Kunz, 
who made the collection, states that it could not 
be duplicated for $100,000. Messrs. Tiffany and 
Co.'s exhibit, taken altogether, represents about 
a million dollars in value. It is noteworthy that 
everything about it is American down to the most 
minute detail. Besides gems and precious stones 
the silver exhibits are entirely worthy in their ex- 
quisite finish of the reputation of this well-known 
house. Every design is unique. A table service, 
worth $44,000, is a master-piece of skill. 

t$ d$8 d% 

The Paris Exposition bronze medal, to be pre- 
sented by the French authorities to deserving ex- 
hibitors, is 2 1-lCth inches in diameter, and is the 
work of a Frenchman, M. Georges Lemaire. On one 
side is a female figure in high relief, and beneath 
this is a sun having the figures 1900 imprinted 
across it. The figure is seated on the capital of a 
column, which is almost hidden by drapery, and 
at the feet of the figure is a scroll, a palette and 
a lyre, typifying fine arts. This side of the medal 
has the simple words, "l'Exposition de Paris." On 
the reverse side is a cartouche, on which will be 
engraved the name of the recipient. At one side 
secured by a banderole, is a sheaf, presumably of 
corn, typifying agriculture, and below, in the cen- 
ter, is an air ship; at the right of this a tele- 
graph pole, and at the left a battleship with fight- 
ing tops, conning towers, and turrets. Still lower 
than this are cog wheels, anvil, governor, etc., and 



at other parts of this side of the medal can be seen 
a camera, telephone, a globe, books and an alem- 
bic, an apparatus formerly employed in distilling, 
but now suspended by the retort. 

*^ 

Among the exhibits in the Petit Palais des Beaux 
Arts at the 1900 Exhibition is a white marble 
clock, for which an offer of $50,000 has just been 
made. The clock is by Falconnet, and is com- 
posed of statuettes of three nymphs standing, and 
is called the "Clock of the Three Graces." They 
are connected by festoons of flowers, surrounding 
a broken fluted pillar, which serves as the base 
of a two-handled vase decorated with festoons of 
oak leaves. This vase contains the works of the 
clock, to the dial of which one of the nymphs is 
pointing with her finger. The owner of the clock 
is Comte Isaac ue Camondo, and the offer of £50,- 

000 was made through M. Jacques Seligman, the 
great dealer in curiosities. As the clock is among 
the objects which Comte de Camondo intends to 
leave to the Louvre at his death, the offer was de- 
clined. In 1881 Comte Abraham de Camondo, the 
father of the present owner, purchased this re- 
markable work of art at a sale for 101,000 fr. Its 
previous owner, Baron Double, paid 7,000fr. for it 
to a dealer, who had bought it for l,500fr. at 
Frankfort. Of course this is like a thousand other 
stories of clocks and paintings and other works 
of art. The clock is a wonder, but if it were mine 

1 would let her go for a quarter of a million. 

The United States is demonstrating at Paris by 
incontrovertible evidence that her mineral re- 
sources are pre-eminent over all other nations. 
The splendid facade which incloses this national 
exhibit in the Palace of Mines and Metallurgy is 
artistic to a wonderful degree, and in itself is one 
of the most attractive exhibits in this department. 
About 15,000 square feet were allotted by France 
to the United States for the exploitation of our 
mining and metal industries. Mr. F. J. V. Skiff, 
Director of Mines and Metallurgy, has placed with- 
in this magnificent enclosure the most varied and 
the richest exhibit that has ever been gathered 
from the United States. The field covered by this 
immense and rare exhibit extends from one ex- 
treme of the United States to the other. Nearly 
every State in the Union has contributed to the 
display, and has presented her best products. Fine 
specimens of zinc from Missouri are shown; a mass 
of bullion from Colorado, valued at many thou- 
sands of dollars, is an item in the exhibit, and 
Pennsylvania presents a piece of coal weighing 
tons. A general exhibit of building stone and clay 
is shown in the collection display of this depart- 
ment. Oregon and Washington make marvellously 
fine exhibits; and when 1 tell you — it cannot be 
officially made known yet — that California has car- 
ried off the grand prize in this department and 
three gold medals, you can throw up your hats. 
We have also captured some other gold medals 
after tremendous opposition, as those French 
juries are made up of a majority of Frenchmen, 
and they are all against us, and admit it, especial- 
ly in arts, fruits and wines. We have beaten the 
world in forestry, and have captured the grand 
prize, if the Superior Jury don't take it away from 
us. We have made a fine fight for Bishop & Co., 
and will get a silver medal sure, which is a great 
thing here in the land of crystallized fruits and the 
jury against us. BEN C. TRUMAN. 

yy«vvv««vvvvyv«vv»«vyvyvvtv»«vvv»v 
m * 

ft Washstand Slabs, Table Tops, Coping, Foot- * 

J warmers, Hitching Posts. Soapstone and Ser- J 

y pentine from Catalina Island. * 

** All kinds of stone and marble work at lowest Jj 

S prices. We quarry and manufacture. Whole- J 

ji sale and retail. < 

\ BANNING CO. \ 

* Tel. 36 222 S. Spring St. J 

* * 



Western Graphic 



13 



15he Country 'R_ ourvd 

Z ^€ ^€ ^ Notes on the Progress of Ovir Country \ ^ ^ 



PASADENA'S assessment is $9,000,000 this 
year. Not a bad showing when it is con- 
sidered the flourishing little city was 
scarce:y on the maps of the world twenty-five 
years ago. 

■J* 

Now is the time to advertise Los Angeles sys- 
tematically throughout the Eastern States. The 
20,000 visitors last winter might easily be made 
100,000 for the season of 1901. 

j( jt 

California dried fruit will hereafter enter Ger- 
many without being subject to detention and ex- 
amination for insect pests. This will somewhat 
aid dried fruit producers who have had rather hard 
lines of late. 

t$ 

Orange county increased its assessment of tax- 
able property $350,000 this year. It is a wonderful 
county, that county of Orange. Like the good 
man, it cannot be kept down by adverse circum- 
stances. Jt jt 

Speaker Henderson found Los Angeles full of 
former Iowa people and received a warm welcome 
here. Public men need to travel over the country. 
In spite of all that is said against junketing trips 
it is a pity more United States Senators and Con- 
gressmen do not come to this coast even at the 
public expense. Some idea of requirements here 
may be obtained from a short stay in population 
centers. <£ £t 

The old story of smoke proving the existence of 
fire is perhaps true of transcontinental railroad 
rumors. Every year we do have actual extensions, 
some of which were promised a decade ago. Be- 
fore January, 1901, there will be three lines tra- 
versing this State with Los Angeles practically 
a southern terminus and San Francisco a north- 
ern terminus. Only one of these — the Southern 
Pacific Coast route — is uncompleted. The slow- 
ness which eastern roads headed this way make 
progress to California is aggravating. Still a few 
miles are built every year and if these Eastern 
roads keep on saving their pennies and investing 
them in railroad iron the Salt Lake and other 
needed connections will be made in time. The 
Associated Press, last Sunday, furnished the news 
that the Denver and Rio Grande will come into 
Los Angeles via the Santa Fe, connecting at Will- 
iams, Arizona; and the Rock Island, via the South- 
ern Pacific, connecting at El Paso. 

Jt J* 

The welcome news of the continuance of the 
rains in Arizona is at hand. Correspondents think 
the drouth of several years has at last been com- 
pletely broken. Salt River had increased its flow 
of miner's inches from 3500 inches in July 21 to 
11,000 inches July 27. Good summer rains in 
Arizona are always considered a favorable omen 
for a generous winter precipitation in Southern 
California. Last Tuesday, July 31, there was an- 
other tremendous precipitation not far from Phoe- 
nix, where the drouth had been very serious. Sev- 
eral people were drowned by the sudden floods in 
the canyons. 

tSf 1 

The German steamers are bringing much trade 
into the port of San Diego. Gold ore, in lots of 
10,000 tons, is being shipped from the west coast 
of South America to San Diego — thence tran- 
shipped by rail via Los Angeles to Pueblo, Colo- 
rado, where the smelters are. The Kaiser's ship, 
Tanis, from Hamburg, Germany, is on the way 
bringing from Chili 1500 tons of nitre for Los An- 
geles. This will be unloaded at San Diego and 
shipped to this city. Just wny an adequate smel- 
ter cannot be maintained in Southern California; 
or considerable consignments of South American 
goods cannot be landed at San Pedro, Redondo 
or Port Los Angeles; or why a few good Ameri- 
can ships cannot be placed so as to attend to the 
Southern American trade is a question which 
might, seemingly, concern the commercial men of 
this city. -J* J* -J* 

H. E. Huntington, first vice-president of the 
Southern Pacific Company, returned to San Fran- 
cisco last week after a stay of fifteen days in this 
city. Mr. Huntington did not say a great deal to 
representattives of the press while here, but to 
private parties he talked more fully of the plans 
of his corporation. The Southern Pacific invest- 
ments in Los Angeles now amount to many mill- 
ions. More millions are to be spent in perfect- 
ing both the steam and electric street car systems 
here. It is the aim of the directors to make the 
latter approach, as closely as possible their fa- 
mous Market street system in San Francisco. Mr. 
Huntington said he fully believes in the pros- 
perous future of Los Angeles. The State is rapid- 
ly to be developed, and the new sea coast line 
is going to help this city. Thousands of well wat- 
ered vaileys exist north of us, which will now be 
quickly settled up and meir trade divided between 
Los Angeles and San Francisco. The Southern 
Pacific regards four cities in California as destined 
to be of great and increasing commercial import- 
ance. Th.ese :are— San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Oakland and Sacramento. 

After the completion of the coast line the rail- 



road shops here will be doubled in capacity. The 
numerous lines centering here at once require 
works at least equal to those in Sacramento. 

Southern Pacific people are not very communi- 
cative concerning their plans, but it can be said, 
absolutely, that enough has been given out to prove 
that the big company has improvements enough 
ahead to create a considerable boom in Los An- 
geles. It may be added that the Southern Pacific 
is a strictly business corporation. It does not ex- 
ist either for fun or philanthropy. The clear- 
headed men who direct the company are not send- 
ing their capital here for any other reason than 
that they see opportunities for investments un- 
equaled elsewhere. 

J» ,* 

In 1895 S. C. de Soissons, a witty French writer, 
visited Southern California, and in 1896 published 
his work, "A Parisian in America." of which a new 
edition has just been issued. A few quotations 
from his book are given: 

"Happy country. (California.) where youth, far 
from being a fault, is almost a privilege; where 
they do not wait until your voice is less clear and 
your words less ardent, until you have left along 
your weary route all the allusions of youth, — until 
your back is bent. — to have confidence in you, to 
trust heavy responsibilities to you." 

"All these American towns and villages, com- 
posed of houses which, freshly painted, look like 



card houses, surrounded by fresh green flowers, 
with trees and flowers here and there, have an at- 
tractive appearance and produce a prettier effect 
than do the towns and villages in France and 
Germany, with their lines of stone houses, crowd- 
ed and standing in the dusty streets." 

"Some of the States of the Union are larger than 
France, which feeds forty millions, while they 
have a few thousand only! Why not follow those 
enterprises which already have been successful in 
California and Texas, irrigating the land making 
unproductive territory pay interest of more than 
a hundred per cent?" 

"The American woman, — fencing, boxing, swim- 
ming, rowing, marching, feeling herself full of sup- 
pleness and elasticity, does not care for protec- 
tion The American woman does not allow herself 
to be carried over a brook — she jumps over it." 

"Americans, alas! know not how to cook, nor 
to vary their dishes, and I am obliged to say cook- 
ing is the worst thing I have found in America. 
No wonder, then, that every American is sick with 
dyspepsia, a sickness almost unknown in Europe, 
at least in France." 

"If you pass to the moral and psychological, 
there is no doubt that the American people, taken 
as a whole, are the most honest and kindhearted 
people, and the United States is the first and great- 
est country for individuality and respect." 

< J* 

A. Sbarbaro, president of the Manufacturers' and 
Producers' Association, is now in Italy. As he is 



a clear-headed and progressive man, his conclu- 
sions are interesting. The following extracts are 
from a letter to a friend. Regarding municipal 
government he says: 

"Well, Europe is ahead of us in some things, but 
we are not behind in others. All the great cities 
of Europe have made vast improvements in the 
past thirty years. In some cases entire districts 
in cities have changed from small streets and 
poor buildings to wide boulevards and magnificent 
buildings. This has been the case notably in 
Paris, Genoa, Kome and Milan. These cities have 
had progressive citizens and good city officials. 
They also have a remarkably good law in the 
matter of award for damages for property taken 
for public improvements. If the property-owner 
is not satisfied with the award, which is generally 
a liberal one, the building is removed and the dis- 
pute settled afterward. Thus no unreasonable ob- 
structionist can stop the march of improvements 
for an indefinite period of time." 

The traveling American is surprised how slowly 
modern improvements get any foothold in Europe. 
Says Mr. Sbarboro: 

"The elevator, even in Paris, and-at the principal 
hotels, goes up so slow that people generally pre- 
fer walking. The telephone is not generally used 
as we do, and as to long-distance telephone, it is 
hardly known. What I do most miss, however, is 
my typewriter. You would hardly believe that 
neither public offices, banks or large commercial 
houses have any typewriters. Even testimony 
in the courts is all taken down as in the time of 
Cicero, in long hand." 

Of the Riviera: 

"The Riviera is admitted by all the world to be 



the garden spot of Europe. Well, I traveled nearly 
all this favored country in a carriage, so that 1 
might better enjoy the flower beds, orange, lemon 
and olive groves and its beautiful scenery and 
climate and in order that I might intelligently 
make a comparison of it with California. The re- 
sult has been that without the fear of contradic- 
tion I can now say that on the whole Riviera 
there is not a tree, a palm, a flower, or a shrub 
that cannot be produced to the same perfection 
in Central and Southern California." 

Qeograpolcal knowledge is not much in evidence 
in Italy. The Italian conductors locate us in 
Africa. 

"When I noticed on an electic street car at. Nice, 
"Place Massena a Californie," I boarded the car, 
rode out to "Californie" and found it really a beau- 
tiful spot. I asked the intelligent conductor why 
the place was named "Californie?" He answered. 
"Because it is the name of a beautiful country in 
Africa, where they produce the orange and the 
lemon, the trees and the flowers and everything 
that we produce here, only in California the dates 
do mature to perfection, which is not the case in 
Nice." 

Mr. Sbarbaro sums up his comparisons with this 

prediction: 

"The time will come I am sure when tourists 
will come to California from all parts of the world, 
for we have many gifts of nature possessed by no 
other country on the face of the globe." 

IIKIUiKRT. 




INITIATING A BOXER. 
Acconnts of why the murderous secret organization that line oecasioued the present, 
trouble in China is named Boxers differ widely. The most reaso -ible and best anthenti- 
c.ited stor> is to the effect, that the society was originally ostensibly in athletic association, 
and that, boxinp, or t'ie "jnanly art of self-defense," was a featnre of the training given 
members. The illustration, is said to represent an important point in the initiating cere- 
monies of the Iloxers. 



14 



Western Graphic 



Among the M\imn\ers 

In the Eyes of the Critic- -Coming Events 



ALTHOUGH the slenderness of its construc- 
tion and the patent indications that "An 
American Citizen' was written especially to 
fit the characteristics of an actor of note and 
marked personality, there is much that is amusing 
in the play and the dialogue is, in the main, scin- 
tillant with bright and wity lines. The title is 
a misnomer, for the American sheds his nationality 
in a somewhat mercenary way, despite the thin 
claim of gallantry and self-sacrifice at the very be- 
ginning of the story. The action in the last three 
acts takes place abroad and the subject of the 
English Queen takes occasion to show not only his 
distaste at his political conversion but, with a very 
bad grace, and with ungentlemanly dfisloyalty, 
takes occasion to rebel at the shackles he has him- 
self placed about his neck, and to resent the na- 
tional traits which find expression in a display of 
the English colors, the playing of the anthem and 
the uncovering at mention of the name of the 
Queen. This is done to raise a laugh on this side 
of the water, of course, but to an Englishman it is 
likely to convey a flippant and disrespectful mean- 
ing and thus give him a bad taste. This, how- 
ever, is the fault of the playwright, who wrote the 
play to the order of Nat Goodwin whose business it 
is to amuse people and make them laugh, but it 
is none the less open to objection as an ungraceful 
thing to do. The story of Cruger, who to cover a 
defalcation of one of his partners, to save his own 
firm from its effects and to spite a mythical so- 
ciety which has first claim on a large legacy if 
Cruger does not become an English citizen, change 
his name and also marry an English girl, and in 
the end loses the money because in his nice sense 
of honor he has married a disinherited relative and 
has failed to make the marriage other than one 
merely of name, leads up to the last act where the 
sturdiness of the expatriated citizen shows him to 
be a man, after all. Unfortunately this last act, 
which could easily be made the most telling one 
of the four is badly written. There is much in it 
that is unnecessary and in the nature of repetition, 
while the more emotional possibilities are not well 
brought out. Much is left to pantomime, and a 
pertinent part of the dialogue is lost both because 
of the low tone of voice employed by the two act 
ors and because the uncurbable audience, which 
has figured out the denouement to its own full 
satisfaction, and is therefore more engrossed in 
hats and wraps than in the business on the stage. 
The American citizen who is shown us is, also, 
rather a rare bird in his way, for as a rule, despite 
the restrictions that his sacrifice has laid upon 
him, an average American would have taken up 
the gauntlet with the cold-storage ex-fiance in a 
more resolute and aggressive way, and brought 
matters to a satisfactory climax in a shorter time. 
But then there wouldn't have been so much of a 
story and the hero wouldn't have been able to do 
the very clever thing of keeping his "wife in name" 
in affluence while he himself was dining on a 
sandwich and a glass of milk. 

The merits of the players who presented this 
play are so incontestibly stamped upon the minds 
of the theater-goers of this city, that the recep- 
tion given them each night was but a natural and 
merited tribute to their worth. At their spring 
visit the members of the Neill Company, by their 
sincerity, conscientiousness and intelligence in the 
presentation of their plays gained the esteem and 
good will of their audiences, so that it is not at 
all remarkable that, despite the dog days, which 
have driven the greater part of our population to 
the beaches and mountains, the Burbank is doing 
an excellent business. The greeting given the 
Neills on their opening night was a brilliant and 
warm-hearted one. 

In the role of Beresford Cruger "afterwards 
called Carew" Mr. Neill has nearly always center 
of stage and is called on to do responsible work 
that is carried through by him in an exemplary, if 
not always convincing manner. He is thoroughly 
conscientious, rarely trenches the bounds of pro- 
priety and fitness and gives a personation that is 
entertaining. Edythe Chapman, playing with more 
more reserve, is yet more forcible in her delinea- 
tion of Mrs. Carew, and in the incident of the writ- 
ing of the letter gives a strong touch that reminds 
one of her earlier experience in stronger drama. 
This admirable actress aided the smooth passing of 
the play and the giving to it of a semblance of 
reality, as a possible exploitation of real life in a 
marked and positive way. A most clever actor, 
and who has a rare power of versatility, Mr. Frank 
MacVicars, made of the part of the senior partner, 
Barbury, a capital characterization, in which every 
shade and touch was given with a fidelity to detail 
and effect that made the part stand out clearly 
and impressively. Mr. Howard, it was easy to see, 
was out of his element as the villain, yet did hon- 
est work Mr. Shackleford as the English valet 
did some dry pantomime that was really clever 
and was rewarded by the outspoken appreciation of 
his audiences. The other members of the com- 
pany were given small parts, in which Miss Lam- 
kin had an opportunity to show her handsome per- 
sonality, Miss Dean to do a touch of the pathetic, 



and the others to fill in the small details that 
were necessary for the rounding out of the story. 

(,$8 

IT is an absolute wonder how the Orpheum con- 
tinues to fill with people these hot evenings. 
It indicates two things — people like good 
vaudeville, and the Orpheum provides the kind 
they like. The chef d'oeuvre of the current pro- 
gram is the sketch, "The Waldorf-Metropole Epi- 
sode," by Clayton White. Marie Stuart and Eva 
Randolph. The success of the triumvirate is Ma- 
rie Stuart, who sings French and other songs and 
dances with spirit. The breath of the Parisian 
cafe chantant lingers about her, though she may 
never have seen one; but she indulges in sundry 
whisks of the skirt and divers kicks and a variety 
of winks that quite capture at least the male por- 
tion' of the audience. Clayton White portrays a 
banker and Prof. O'Mugg, a tough physical culture 
instructor. 

John Donohue and Mattie Nichols sing, dance 
and do flip-flaps. Donohue is a weak performer 
and endeavors to raise a laugh by a continuous 
repetition of a silly contortion. Miss Nichols is 
clever, both as a dancer and in her acrobatic 
work. 

Stella Mayhew is becoming more of a favorite 
with her second week. Her personality is one 
that forces every one into sympathy with her 
work, and her chuckle invariably brings a chorus 
of chuckles from the audience. 

Mrs. Blitz-Paxton has improved wonderfully 
over last week. It was pleasing to note that she 
had gained sufficient self-possession to bestow a 
few very pretty smiles over the house. Mrs. Blitz 
Paxton looks prettiest when looking downward, 
and it would add to the charm of her warm and 
limpid vocalization. 

Smith and Fuller repeat their musical act. which 
pleases the people immensely. Their rag-time 
numbers are certainly the perfection of bewildering 
syncopation. 

The least said about Williamson and Stone the 
better. They are alleged black face comedians 
who perpetrate the most hoary jokes and indulge 
in the most inane horseplay that have invaded 
vaudeville since the days of the old Park theater. 

Cues for the Public 

LOS ANGELES has had the proud distinction 
of setting adrift on the sea of professional 
life, several sorts and kinds of home prod- 
ucts, more especially "sorts and kinds." The latest 
product, however, overtops anything heretofore 
undertaken by us. A certain young lady who has 
acquired considerable facility in reproducing 
barnyard and farm melodies, proposes to go upon 
the vaudeville stage as the original and only genu- 
ine specimen of the kind extant, and reproduce in 
living, vivid colors, the grunt of a porker; the de- 
fiant, but asthmatic warwhoop of a Spanish 
rooster; the bellowing of a calf that wants its 
dinner mighty bad; the' cackles of a hen after fur- 
nishing her contribution for the breakfast table; 
the mellifluous accents of a California burro; the 
dulcet lullabys of feline night prowlers; the sev- 
eral grades of canine composition, together with 
Chinese baby colic etudes, tom-toms and things. 
How long this young lady will be permitted to live 
is a very interesting problem. 

J* ,< jH 

Nothing is more pleasing to the general public 
than to note the favor with which our local talent, 
musical and dramatic, is received in other cities. 
Miss Jessie Padgham, who made such a splendid 
impression at her debut on the local vaudeville 
stage, is adding to her laurels nightly at the San 
Francisco Orpheum. Town Talk has this to say 
about her: Ever since the woman vocalist has be- 
come a fixture at the vaudeville house, the audi- 
ences frequently suffer the pangs of disgust when 
inefficient and ill-trained singers are permitted to 
insult the musical ear. Fortunately there are 
times when the management is able to obtain the 
services of intelligent vocalists whose musical edu- 
cation has not been neglected and whose artistic 
work is a delight to witness. One of these rare 
cases may be sought in Miss Jessie Padgham of 
Los Angeles, who is creating quite a little sensa- 
tion at the Orpheum. Indeed the management de- 
serves to be congratulated upon the choice it has 
made, for Miss Padgham possesses a most exqui- 
site soprano, whose flexibility, sympathetic quality 
and attractive softness make it well adapted for 
the better class of ballads. The young lady pos- 
sesses a splendid vocal technic. 

Harrington Reynolds, he of the military bearing, 
the admired heavy man of the Frawley company, 
takes a part in Mr. Frawley's production of "The 
Great Ruby" in San Francisco in which he must 
drop from a balloon. A writer in the News-Letter 
has just found out that Harrington Reynolds does 
not make his own daring leap from the balloon. 
He did jump the first and second nights, but after 
that a human dummy was put in the cage to 



plunge the twenty-four feet. Mr. Frawley had 
taken every precaution to insure the safety of his 
heavy man. He had poulticed the woodwork un- 
<<er the stage with the softest of feathers; he had 
detailed twelve supers to hold the fireman's sheet 
of canvas at the bottom of the drop (sixteen feet 
below the level of the stage); he had told Rey- 
nolds how easy it was, and at rehearsals had made 
the fall himself by way of encouragement. 

But the heart of the heavy man grew faint; and 
the first night he was the most reluctant Steve 
Brodie you ever saw; the second night he jumped 
first to the stage and then down the hole. 

"Holy Morosco!" said Frawley; "there are no 
stop-overs on this trip. And you were a captain in 
Her Majesty's army." 

"That's all right; I'd rather be a captain now 
and fight Boxers than shoot that chute." 

And they couldn't get him in the balloon again. 
So a husky young gentleman of the South-side has 
been substituted in the sensational scene. 
^8 fe?^ 

D. Bonoff, the successful furrier of Los Angeles, 
has found it necessary to enlarge his quarters and 
has secured the fine rooms just across the hall 
from his former apartments at 247 So. Broadway. 
Many ladies find it extremely convenient to place 
their furs in Mr. Bonoff.'s care during the summer. 

*i$8 

Walter Sheckles, of Sheckles and Davidson, the 
team of gymnasts who will make their debut at 
the Orpheum next week, is well-known in Los An- 
geles. For several years he has been rated as the 
bpst acrobat in Southern California, and possesses 
a magnificent physical development. Something 
over a year ago he and another young man were 
perfecting an act for the vaudeville circuit, in 
which was one very difficult and dangerous stunt. 

?yiOROSCO S BURBANK THEATER 

"* Oliver Morosco, Lessee and Manager 

Matinee Today and Tonight, last times of the great 
comedy success, "An American Citizen" 

Commencing tomorrow night and all week — Matinee 
Saturday only, 

nR. JAMES NEILL 

AND THE INCOMPARABLE 

NEILL COMPANY 

Presenting Bronson Howard's Comedy Drama 

44 Aristocracy " 

Prices 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c. Note — Children under 7 
years of age not admitted to any Neill performance. 

MAIN STREET' 
BET. FIB8T 
AND SECOND 
Los Angelas' 
Family VandeTilla 
Thaatar 

Week Commencing Honday , Aug. 6 

Adgle, "The Lady of Lions"— one week only 
Caroline Hull, the Triple- Voiced Vocalist 
Mazie King, the Marvelous Tip-toe Dancer 
The Tobina, Novelty Instrumentaliata 
8hecklea and Davidson, Acrobats 
Williamson & Stone, Black-face Comedians. 
•John Donahue and Mattie Nickola, Acrobatic Comedians 
Clayton White and Marie Stuart, assisted by Eva Ran- 
dolph 

PRICES never changing— 25c and 50c: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 

Imperial Co ^ rt c ^ aI1 




Family Restaurant' 
and Oyster ParlorsJ* 



Phone IOI 



243 S. SPRING STREET 
242 S. BROADWAY... 



Grand Concerts daily from 12 noon to 1.30 p. m. 
6 to 7 and 8 to 12 evenings. Orchestra under direction 
of P. J. Franks, late of Chicago. Everything first-class. 

Theater Parties a Specialty 
HALMER & PUTZMAN, Managers. 



Joseph Maier, 

Pres. and Treas. 



George Zobelein 

Vice-Prea. and Sec 



eo'y ff 



HOME INDUSTRY KEEP MONEY AT HOME 

MAIER & ZOBELEIN 




I 



Incorporated 

444 ALISO STREET 
Los Angeles, Cal 



Western Graphic 



IS 



A short time before the date set for their first ap- 
pearance Sheckels' partner fell and broke his neck 
while practicing the difficult feat. The sad acci- 
dent was a great weight upon Sheckles' mind for 
many months, and his friends are now glad to hear 
that he has shaken off the gloom that might have 
ruined his life. 

J* Jt 
Orpheum 

Adgie and her famous trained lions will be one 
of the principal new attractions at the Orpheum 
next week. Three years ago this marvelous train- 
er exhibited her pets and they created a sensation 
in the theater. The woman's control of them was 
conceded to be unearthly. It is a thrilling spec- 
tacle provided by the slender human being who 
ventures alone and unprotected into a cage of 
beasts, and this thrill is never lacking when Ad- 
gie is on the stage with her lions. 

Caroline Hull, the triple voiced vocalist, is also 
to return after two years' absence. She sings in 
three distinct registers. Her voice is powerful 
melodious and magnetic. 

Mazie King is a toe dancer and has scored a suc- 
cess in San Francisco. 

Other acts will be: The Nichols Sisters, black 
face comediennes; the Tobins, musical artists; 
Sheckles and Davidson, a team of Los Angeles 
acrobatic marvels, who make their first appear- 



ance on the stage next week; Clayton White and 
Marie Stuart; Montgomery and Stone, and Dono- 
hue and Nichols. 

.< .< JH 
Morosco's 

"Aristocracy," Bronson Howard's society drama, 
will be the second week's offering at the Burbank 
Theater, commencing tomorrow night, by Mr. 
lames Neill and his incomparable Neill Company. 
"Aristocracy" was first produced at Palmer's 
Theater, New York, and was the sensation of the 
hour. It shows how easy it is to obtain entrance 
into the most exclusive set in England if you only 
have the money. The piece was suggested to Mr. 
Howard in a speech delivered by James Bryce, 
Professor of Civil Law at Oxford. Mr. Bryce said: 
"Wealth in the United States does not as in Eng- 
land give its possessor an immendiate entree into 
fashionable society. In England great wealth can 
practically buy rank; or by obliging persons who 
command society, induce them to force the up- 
start into it." The suggestion in this speech was 
at once apparent to Mr. Howard, who at once went 
to work on the drama, and "Aristocracy," one of 
the strongest dramas of the decade, is the result. 
The piece will be mounted splendidly with all the 
care and sumptuousness for which the Neill Com- 
pany is noted. 



lated to disturb the rest of her neighbors on Fig- 
ueroa street. The Major in the story is to blame, 
it seems. He sent the husband, it was written, 
on an errand if importance to Chicago or some- 
where, paying all his expenses beside a good-sized 
money salary to stay there and look after the 
business, whatever it was. And now, the epistle 
ran, the neighbors object — hut anonymous people 
have no right to write their thinks to the Graphic. 
< * < 

We went to Terminal the other day, John and 
I, to see if it was still there. It is. It is alive and 
kicking. They have been having no end of gaie- 
ties, watermelon picnics, launch parties, candy 
pulls and what not. Mr. Cosby gave an awfully 
swell luncheon at the Gordon Arms on Friday to 
about a dozen guests from Los Angeles and the 
same day Mrs. J. A. Anderson had a large whist 
party at her own cottage. There were six tables 
and the afternoon passed most delightfully; Mr. A. 
A. Pomeroy gave two large launch parties; Mrs. 
Sale and Mrs. J. H. Davisson entertained a launch 
and luncheon party of twenty-eight guests, and 
the Wellborns have been enterta.ning continually 
since they have taken the Helm cottage. Young 
people en masse enjoy the cospitalities; and there 
are gaities without number. 

Why doesn't Mrs. Rule wear that gay and dash- 
ing bathing suit, that was made in San Francisco, 
I wonder. ANN IDLER. 



With the Butterflies 

Doings ^ Among ^ People ^ in the ^ Gay ^ Life 



TDO not have a bit of time any more to look 
for troubles — all on account of John. I have 
troubles, you might say, of my own John's. 
You see since we began "mingling" in good society 
John always wishes, in the middle of things, we 
were at home. It was exactly that way when we 
were going to Catalina. We had just gotten about 
half way over when John broke out with "I wish 
I was at home." "I wish, too, you were, "I said 
"and if wishes were fishes we might swim home. 
It's the fashion now to go to Catalina and you 
know you might as well be out of the world as 
out of fashion." "Well, I'd rather be out of the 
world just now," said John. 

"But then how in the world would you be 'in 
it,' " I ventured to suggest. Men are so unreason- 
able. Such a time as we had. John didn't care to 
go to Catalina at all. He wanted to go "up north" 
or somewhere and let me and Demijohn and the 
baby and the maid — I made a mistake, I mean 
three maids. You have to have three nurse maids 
nowadays when you have your name in the society 
papers — especially if you want to be in the swim at 
Redondo. To return to the story: when John pro- 
posed that I go to Catalina myself and by the chil- 
dren and a maid and a half apiece I said "No! 
It may be the beginning of my downfall in society 
to go anywhere with my husband, bui if I can 
stand it I daresay they can." 

And besides. Now that we have moved in so- 
ciety we have become Christian science and we 
can make ourselves believe we are happy though 
married. 

So we decided to go to Catalina and like the 
Irish lovers in the play — we concluded if we must 
part we would go together. 

Before we started we wrote to all the other 
places we weren't coming. We like to "do" all 
the resorts— that is to say, we wrote we weren't 
coming till later on. 

Catalina is a nice place. It is so curious, a whole 
curio shop on a large scale. Wherever else do 
you see those fantastic objects encased in a coat 
on a pair of plain legs and several stories of pa- 
goda headgear, meandering the beach if not in 
Catalina? Those figures are exactly like a certain 
Ramacherdravaramu— a man, a servant man, I 
once knew in Rajahmahendravaramu who deco- 
rated his bare body with one of massa's red fringed 
table covers "that was lost in the wash" and from 
the waist up was simply gorgeous. It would have 
been quite as picturesque if the other half of him 
had likewise been "out of sight." Really it car- 
ried me back to Hindoodashramoo every time I 
took a straight gaze up and down the beach. I 
daresay some of those figures will be quite ready 
"to go to the front" to China before long— unless 
they never get further than Chinatown. 

But dear me! There are so many curious things 
about Catalina. One innovation seems to be that 
this year you can really run the gauntlet of passing 
through the double file of spectators that is on 
duty at every incoming steamer without being 
guyed to death on your ghastly— behavior and so 
forth. It is against the law now to "make re- 
marks" at arrivals and as I have been informed 
the first person who dares to open his mouth is 
promptly closed up. So now one can land in 
peace. 

Catalina is a great place for Pasadenans. In 
fact it is called the most cosmopolitan resort of 
the Pacific. Angelenos are not very plentiful it 
seems, or rather they were not until Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard M. Sale and a party went over on Wednes- 
day. It seems there is a stereotyped division for 
Angelenos in August; Catalina the beginning of 
the month and Santa Monica the latter half. Mrs. 



Sale was really the pioneer of the party that went 
over on Wednesday. There were a number of 
prominent people from Santa Paula, about thirty 
in all — and fishing and yachting parties will be 
next. Mrs. Sale has been tendered Mr. Banning's 
yacht for an excursion for the delectation of her 
friends — and if I knew a new pun for Sale besides 
sail — although nothing more apropos could be 
thought of when punning is plain sailing — I would 
promptly make it. However, I shall have to think 
of something. The Hancock Bannings are having 
a house party extending from last Thursday until 
Monday for a number of the young butterflies. 
^ ■<■* 

John and I have taken up Christian Science, you 
know, since we are in the swim and it is "such a 
comfort when we have other people's queer doings 
to discuss. There are so many things we don't un- 
derstand — and never could understand. For in- 
stance: the first night we came, after we had din- 
ner and all at the Metropole and were quite "taken 
back" (to the time we used to be swell way back 
in Sassamansville) we went to our room and after 
I had spread out my pet — co — t over the pillow, for 
my grandmother taught me never to stay away 
from home without putting my petticoat — dear 
me, I said it all that, time — on the pillow, we be- 
gan to speculate on the curiosities of the Island. 

"Let's read a chapter," said John. While John 
was reading the chapter and I was putting my hair 
in curl papers — I believe in being methodical — and 
John came to the "all is vanity" — we read that 
nearly every day since we are in society — John 
said: 

"What are the things women wear in their hair 
now at dinners?" I thought the question irrele- 
vant and as I like to stick to the script I said: 
"It's a new-fangled bow of ribbon — only a piece of 
vanity — " 

"You mean a piece of kelp," said John. 
"What nonsense," I said, "you could never stiffen 
a piece of kelp to stand up that way." 

"It must be dried kelp, that's stiff, you know." 
Sure enough, the next night at dinner I looked 
and it was kelp, red on one side and black on the 
other. After all — "vanitas vanitatum." 
-.4 ■.•* 

When we came back we found society had died 
an unnatural death after we left. Now I do not 
know of a single thing that would interest you 
if I dared to tell. There is something I daren't 
tell and that is that a young lady of the smart 
set and quite a friend of yours is going to be mar- 
ried sure enough and that she is making her 
trousseau just as fast as she can. It is lots of fun 
because she won't announce the engagement. I 
think I will take the trouble on my own shoulders 
and announce it— next week. Of course the fiancee 
is a doctor and there are plenty of doctors already 
in the family, but then if the young lady wants to 
do some discounting on her own account what's the 
odds, so she's happy. And when I tell you who it 
Is you will say she deserves to be happy at all 
odds. 

Mrs. John D. Foster has gone East and so have 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sartori — quite a thinning of 
the ranks that usually "swell" our summer news.. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sartori have been obliged to leave 
suddenly on account of the illness of Mr. Sartori. 

J* :* v* 

About a month ago, the Graphic had an anony- 
mous communication that went the way all anony- 
mous communications do — into, what our country 
correspondent calls, "the waist-basket." It in- 
formed us that a lady at one time prominent in 
the west end improved the shining hours of her 
spouse's absence in the East in a manner calcu- 



Too 

Cheap 

to 

Miss 



U/HBN you think that the 
Western Graphic 
costs only 25 cents a mouth 
you should take another 
think and send in your order. 
The monthly subscription is 
collected by a coin remittance 
card, which is mailed you to- 
gether with a stamped return 
envelope. By this system 
you are not annoyed by petty 
collections nor embarassed 
by the inopportune presenta- 
tion of a big delinquent bill. 
It's pay as you go and stop 
when you please. Put a 
quarter in the card and 



Uncle 
Sam 

Does the 

Rest 



Longo 



The Ladies' and Gentlemen's 

Has now the handsomest establishment of 
its kind in Southern California at 

222 S. Broadway 

It is in accord with the reputation of hia 
Garments. They are the recognized 
Standard 



Long 



o Gentlemen's Tailor 




CHINESE ARTILLERY THAT WAS 



The outbreak in China has brought with it some of the nsual surprises that accompany 
■war. Moot important of these this time is the suddenly acquired general knowledge that 
the Orientals have, since their war with Japan, been rapidly learning the deadly art of war 
and have been extensively equipping themselves with the latest and most perfect enginery 
of warfare. In exclusive circles composed of those who have to do constantly with mili- 
tary affairs the changed and changing conditions in China were known, but to the ordinary 
citizen the news comes as a revelation. Up to less than three years ago the whole world 
looked upon China as B country that was a century behind the leading European and 
American nation i in military matters. The illustration shows a type of the artillery that 
the Chinese placed their reliance upon not bo long ago. When the IJritisli took possession 
■of the territory known as the hinterlang of Hongkong, about, two years ago, they found tliis 
old gun in the city of Kauluug. It was mounted for the defence of the city, and in it lius 
natives seemed to place implicit confidence. 



HOTEL 

del Monte 



In every detail and in all its 
Envionment Ideally 
Californian 




The Most riagnificent Hotel 
The Most Expansive Landscape 
The Most Varied Forests 
The Most Delightful Temperature 
The Most Superb Flowers 



IN ALL 

AMERICA 



One hundred and twenty=six acres of cultivated 
ground, and almost the whole of the Peninsula 
of Honterey for a playground 



Send for Illustrated pamphlet to any agent 
or the Southern Pacific Company, 
of for special monthly rates, write 



W. A. JUNKER 

MANAGER 



5 Hartford Oil Company 



ARE NOW DRILLING 



■ 

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McKittrick, Cal., July 24, 1900 

HARTFORD OIL CO. 

Currier Bui 1 ding , 

Los Ange 1 es , Cal. 

The drill will drop July 26. 

CHAS. YOULE . 

No more stock will be sold after we strike oil. Buy 
now. Stock 1 2 J/2 cents per share. 

HARTFORD OIL COMPANY 

J. S. DILLON, President H C. DILLON, Secretary 



FIVE COOL RESORTS 



SANTA MONICA .• . 
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All (juickest and easiest reached via SOUTHERN PACIFIC. 

Ample equipment and speedy service at convenient hours. Special 
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drives, etc. 

Time cards in newspapers and Los Angeles Railway Co.'s street cars. 



$1.50 



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SIX HODELS 

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Fully paid and Non-assessable 
Par Value $1.00 

An Open Letter to Our Stockholders 

SUMMERLAND, CAL., JULY 6, 1900. 

Women's Pacific Coast Oil Co., Lou Arigelen. Cal. 

Lawk.-:— Contract for Hickey & Robinson received and delivered, i nave to report 
that work is begun on the derrick, and that th« drillers expect to be able to begin drill- 
ing next Tuesday. It will be necessary for you to buy mid ship the 1% casing at once. 
I presume the best Unit can be done with 'he notice given will be to get it started on 
the freight Monday. I told them 1 would write to you today, ordering you to ship it, 
and that seemed to be satisfactory to them. I am very sincerely yours, 

DWIGHT KEMPTON. 



Absolutely the Best Bicycle 
in the Market . . . 



334 Copp Building, 218 S. Broadway 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



I'll. in,' .l.ilm list 



OEO. RICE & SONS. (Inc.) LOS ANGELES. 



Long Beach (illustrated) in This Number 

WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

<~/In Illustrated Fe^mily Weekly of the Sovithwest 

WITH WHICH IS c|o NSOLIDATKD T II K LOS A N G K I. K 8 S U K D 1 I W O B L D A N I> CALIFORNIA 0 U B I 0 

gIrgiS fx x . v,,, (No.6. Los Angeles, Saturday, August U, 1900. Price 10 Cents 




THE METEOR 

•n«cr Steamer, II. I). Kyus, Captain, plying between I. our Beach anil Terminal Island 



WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

<Jln Illustrated Family Weekly of tfte Sovithwest 

WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED T1IR 

SUNDAY WORL D and CAL IFORNIA CURIO 
GEO. RICE_& SONS, (Inc.) 

Pl'BI.UHED EVRKV SATURDAY MORNING AT 

sil-313 New High Street Telephone Main 10 r »:! 

■ MTItfD AT TM( LOS ANQELES *0|T OFFICE AS SECOND - CLASS MATTE* 

SUBSCNIPTrONS— Three Dollars a Year; ur. Twenty-five en's 
a month, collected by Remittance Card system^ all postage paid 
bv the publishers. 

CO.VT/l/Bin/ONS—lVe pay cash for accepted contributions, 
those containing photographs for reproduction being most avail- 
able. The usual rules regarding manuscripts should be observed 
to insure consideration. 



T5he Editor's Say 

IT must be a sad reflection to the once noisy 
defenders and eulogists of "patriot" Oom Paul 
Kruger of the Transvaal, to note his present 
stand in the last extremity. Once so eager to give 
up everything, even life, for the preservation of 
the republic, the first law of human nature as- 
serts itself with startling positiveness when Eng- 
land's mailed hand is raised to strike the final 
blow. He is sublimely cool in his offer to sur- 
render country and people in exchange for his per- 
sonal safety and comfort. It is too cheap. Eng- 
land should enjoy the full fruits of her victory, 
even to the maintaining of the noble patriot at 
the nation's expense on the island of St. Helena. 

(,$5 

And yet another week of the great Chinese mys- 
tery and horror of horrors. The whole world 
stands aghast at the perfidy of the Chinese, a 
people with a history, if we may believe anything 
Chinese, ante-dating that of any nation on earth, 
a people with a record of cruelty, deceit, cunning 
and obtuseness without a parallel. The China- 
man can only be compared with himself and be 
classed as a Chinaman. Nothing more, nothing 
less, a brutal, stubborn, "heathen Chinee." What 
the final outcome will be no man can guess. Our 
own country, through its loyal, courageous and 
humane government, from the President down to 
the private in ranks, is doing the right thing at 
the right time and deserves the hearty support of 
all the people. 

!4?^ 

The County Board of Education. 

Luther G. Brown, attv. and ex-school teacher, 

W. H. Wright, et al., 
rushed into print a few days since, to attempt to 
shield themselves from the odium of a very small 
piece of busness — that of pretending to let county 
printing by bid, and then not doing so. The 
insinuation that the Graphic is quarreling with 
another printing firm is a gratuitous falsehood and 
the author of the story knew it when he gave it to 
the press. The grand jury set its stamp of disap- 
proval upon these people and they had better try 
to live that stigma down rather than add new 
trouble to themselves. 

fe?^ 

England will undertake to get some of the sur- 
p us gold, with which this country seems to have 
an over-supply by borrowing it. The British ex- 
chequer has asked the bankers of New York City 
to take $28,000,000 of their bonds, which were 
snapped up, over $55,000,000 being subscribed in a 
short time. The Pall Mall Gazette says: "The 
loan shows America will occupy a new role in the 
future — that of lender. Ere long American op- 
erators and investors will interest themselves in 
the international group and be a factor to be 
reckoned with." 

The WestminsterGazette, under the heading, "The 
Treasury's Insu't to City; America Financing Our 
War," says: "There was little use in opening 
the lists at all, seeing the chancellor had arranged 
to borrow most of the money in America. In 
any case the fact might have been made clear in 
the prospectus, which was a misleading document. 
When an issue is already half subscribed, even by 
pushable American insurance companies, it is 
usual to state the fact. The stock exchange com- 
mittee may recall this when the quotation comes 
to be considered." 

The Financial News refers to the United States 
as the "world's new banker." 

The disfranchisement of the negro in North 
Carolina is a political crime that will surely and 
inexorably bring deserved punishment upon its 
instigators. The Constitution of the United 
States secures to the negro the rights of citizen- 
ship, and the free exercise of the elective fran- 
chise throughout the length and breadth of our 
land. Conviction for crime can alone deprive him 
of these rights. While each state is permitted to 
regulate the manner in which electors shall exer- 
cise this prerogative within its own boundaries, 
any individual or organized obstruction to the 
free use of the franchise where national officers 
are to be elected, is a criminal violation of the 
Constitution which smacks loudly of treason 



That this infamous conspiracy to disfranchise 
American citizens because of race and color can 
be consummated is hardly credible. 

jv J»" it* 

The brutal murder of King Humbert of Italy 
again brings into prominence the necessity for a 
united action on the part of the civilized powers, 
republics as well as monarchies, to bring to swift 
and certain punishment not only the perpetra- 
tors of the fiendish crimes, but every abettor and 
sympathizer therewith. To claim that these 
devils are human beings and entitled to the rights 
and immunities of civilized man under the law, 
is to place humanity on a level with the savage 
beasts of the forest, whose only instinct is a crav- 
ing for blood. The depth of their moral degrada- 
tion has placed them outside the pale of human- 
ity, and they should be hunted down swiftly and 
mercilessly. It is to be hoped that this last fright- 
ful exhibition of their insatiable thirst for human 
blood will result in drastic measures for the sup- 



pression of so monstrous a menace to life and to 
law and order throughout the world. 

jf f" 

One of the loudest and most blatant anti-im- 
perialists before the public today is a leading con- 
spirator in this "death-to-the-negro" crime. Sena- 
tor Ben. Tillman of North Carolina. For months 
this aider and abettor of Aguinaldo and his 
treacherous, half-civilized followers, has been 
shouting and braying against the government for 
its patriotic and determined effort to uphold the 
dignity and honor and prestige of our country's 
fair name. With reckless effrontery this political 
incendiary inveigled against "government without 
the consent of the governed," while at the same 
mcment he was assisting to consumate one of the 
most dastardly and cowardly crimes against his 
fol'ow citizens, known in the history of this 
country. And yet. Mr. William Jennings Bryan, 
the would-be president of this great republic, is 
proud of his henchman. 



Notebook and Camera 

Personalities and Happenings ^ N£ 



ONE of the old war horses in Los Angeles 
politics is Henry Z. Osborne, whose abili- 
ties in that and other lines of work have 
been felt continuously since away back in the 
eighties, when he was the helmsman of the Ex- 
press and a power in the land. During the strug- 
gle over the site for a deep water harbor he was 
unfortunate enough, in a popular sense, to espouse 
the claims of Santa Monica, by which the Express 
lost prestige for a time. Since disposing cf his 
interests in the paper Mr. Osborne has been for- 
tunate in receiving lucrative positions of a public 
natuie. for awhile acting as collector of the port 



at Port Los Angeles, and being now United States 
Marshal for this district. Mr. Osborne is a gentle- 
man of decidedly pleasing personality, fair-minded 
and generous, and he numbers among his per- 
sonal friends many men who were and are politi- 
cal enemies. He has an interesting family, a son 
having developed into a clever newspaper man. 

For many years Harry Wyatt has been looked 
upon as the original amusement manager of Los 
Angeles. And his experiences as impressario in 
this city have been interesting. First as director 
of the destinies of the Grand Opera House, now 
the Orpheum, he has been through all the wran- 
gles and felicitations of the show business con- 
tinuously since. The confirmation of the news 
that he had again secured the Los Angeles theater 
for a year, with an option for two, is pleasing to 
his friends, who one and all wish him a larger 
measure of success than has fallen to his lot for 
the past few years. 

v£ 

With easy grace the City Council has succumbed 
to the indomitable energy and superb nerve of 
Wilshire, the bill poster, who is now privileged 
by law to maintain his bill boards at a height of 
ten feet. This will cause him the annoyance of 
securing more leases for stands, for the removal 
of the top tiers of boards will necessitate string- 
ing them out over more country, making the eye- 
sores more numerous if not so enormous. 

If Judge Shaw does not pack his trunk and re- 
move to San Francisco for keeps it will not be for 
lack of encouragement. His summary disposition 
of some pool room cases while sitting on a San 
Francisco superior bench has won for him an 



av;>lanehe of praise from the press of that city, 
and the unstinted enconiums of the people active 
in prosecuting the gamblers. 

^8 

Stories of sudden fortunes made in oil are be- 
ginning to drift down from San Francisco with 
such regularity that our local flock of new million- 
aires are likely to be overshadowed. A late one 
concerns a Pine street manipulator, who invested 
$50 as a flyer in the Petroleum Center a year ago, 
and who now counts his winnings at nearly 
$5,000. Another is the case of a well known min- 
ing lawyer on Montgomery street, who twelve 
months since, organized a company for operations 
in the Bakersfield district, and at this time would 
not sell out his interest in the corporation for 
$^00,000. 

JH JC ,4 

George Ebey, the ubiquitous press agent of the 
Orpheum, is the originator of a new word, with 
which he designates an old, familiar and aggravat- 
ing species of the genus homo. It is the "catch- 
thecarskee," who is a man that runs over his fel- 
low beings just before the last act in a frantic 
endeavor to catch a car home and never lets any- 
one enjoy the last act. It is a great relief to a 
long-suffering public to be provided with a suit- 
able nomenclature for the beast, as heretofore 
every man in the immediate vicinity of one of 
them has been obliged to originate a suitable ex- 
pression on the spur of the moment, and as the 
words are usually pronounced soto voce and 
through clenched teeth, the comparing of notes on 
the matter has been impossible. 

JH M :< 

The friends of James McLachlan exhibit a smug 
satisfaction in asserting that with his close con- 
nection with the Republican "machine" he is sure 
of the nomination for congress. The probabilities 
are that with his experience in politics Mr. Mc- 
Lachlan does not share with his admirers their 
optimistic confidence in the security of his posi- 
tion. There is hard work ahead for both Mr. Mc- 
Lachlan and Byron Oliver, with the powerful ad- 
vantage of impeccability, popularity and youth- 
ful energy in favor of the latter. Mr. Oliver's 
record as an atorney is a strong point for his 
success. In a career extending over several years 
he has kept clean of anything pettifogging or un- 
scrupulous, and he is admired among his fellows 
for his pertinacity and fairness. 

The nomination of William P. James for the 
short term judgeship of the superior court would 
be a fitting tribute to the worth and ambition of 
a young man. As Justice of the Peace for Los 
Angeles township he enjoys the remarkable rec- 
ord of not having a single decision reversed by the 
superior court on points of law. When but a boy 
Justice James acquired a habit of study that has 
not diminished, and each point in a case is di- 
gested and studied with care and judgment. 
■ < .< ,< 

It is not to be wondered at that the Russians 
are reported to be indulging in monstrous .atroci- 
ties in China. In the first place, all news from 
feverish China must be taken cum grano salis, 
for there is every probability of its being highly 
colored by the time it reaches our breakfast table. 
If one stops to think what strength and skill 
would be required to toss a fifteen or twenty-five 
pound baby from bayonet to bayonet, and that 
such accomplishments are not part of the train- 
ing of any soldiers yet heard of, the hideous 
"news" may be read with half a smile of amuse- 
ment. 

Granting that the soldiers of the Czar are over- 
stepping the conventionalities of "civilized" war- 
fare, it is not surprising. In Russia the people 
are born and bred to hardship, which begets 
cruelty, and the constant contact with the terrors 
of Siberia does much to harden their hearts to 
dreadful deeds. Further, the Russians have vivid 
pictures of the horrible torture and murder in- 
flicted by the Chinese upon their prisoners, such 
as slicing off the victim's flesh bit by bit, crushing 



Western Graphic 



3 



their fingers, skinning them 'alive and sundry 
other exquisitely fiendish things; and with their 
own possible fate in their mind's eye the bewhis- 
kered "-iskis" may be in some measure condoned 
for visiting the pigtails with swift judgment. In 
the opinion of many thinking people nothing short 
of slaughter and the torch will teach the Chinese 
the lesson that is necessary, and the advocates of 
"a thousand Chinese lives for every white man" 
are becoming more numerous daily. 

J* £ 

The Irish are certainly on top. The evidence is 
indisputable that an Irishman fresh from Cork 
has obtained editorial control of the San Fran- 
cisco Wasp. The people respectfully offer as ex- 
hibit number one the following, which appeared 
under a portrait in the last isue: "Picture of the 
ill-fated merchant taken on the boat he lost his 
life in a few days before his death." 

The development of modern science has laid 
bare so many of nature's secrets, that new dis- 
coveries, however strange and startling, create but 
a ripple on the surface of the great sea of human 
life. It has been left for a Los Angeles reporter 
of vaudeville scintillations, however, to discover 
a secret of nature that has baffled the sages of 
physical science during the millions of centuries 
that have come and gone since the first feeble 
rays of light fell upon the globe we occupy. All 
of us have been made more or less familiar with 
the fact that the amount of power necessary to 
overcome the inertia of a dead object and force it 
into rapid motion, depends entirely upon the size 
and weight of the object and, to a limited degree, 
the density of the atmosphere through which it 
is projected. As a convincing illustration, we may 
take the small arms that are now being used 
against the heathen Chinee, and the big million- 
ton rifles that smashed up Cervera and his bul- 
warks of Spanish despotism. In the former case 
small charges of powder will keep the deadly 
things zipping and humming and buzzing in a 
steady rythmic manner without apparent effort or 
interruption, as long as the supply of fodder lasts, 
It is not so with the million-ton ordnance, 
their immense size and range requires time to 
bring them into action, and comparatively long in- 
tervals must elapse between shots. That the same 
physical laws control and govern the singing 
voice of woman, especially if a heavy contralto, 
is the stupendous discovery of our vaudeville 
scribe. As in the case of all great discoveries, his 
attention was first attracted towards the strange 
phenomenon by a purely trivial incident. On the 
bills the lady in question was advertised as a 
"Triple- Voiced Vocalist," "Gifted Contralto," etc., 
etc. In other words, a million-ton vocal-ordnance. 
Upon close observation he found that the voice 
seemed to come with an effort, as though the 
charge of air by which it was exploded was hard- 
ly sufficient for projecting the heavy missile with 
a proper degree of rapidity, although the detona- 
tion indicated phenomenal range. His curiosity 
being once aroused, he immediately plunged into 
a critical and exhaustive investigation of the sub- 
ject, with the result that he can demonstrate in a 
scientific and logical manner that a triple-voiced 
vocalist of the contralto species, is built upon the 
same lines exactly as a million-ton battleship- 
destroyer, and that in addition to the slowness of 
a voice of that character in coming into action, 
the density of the vaudeville auditorium atmos- 
phere at limes is a matter to be reckoned with 
where phenomenal range is sought for. 
■Jt Jt 

"Lord Raleigh's graceful little act of sacrificing 
his costly cloak so that the queen could go dry- 
shod has been outdone by a western bride." 
"What did she do?" "On a very slippery day last 
winter she scattered the cremated ashes of her 
first husband on the front steps so that her second 
husband wouldn't slip down."— Cleveland Plain 
Dealer. 

J. B. Duke of the Westlake Hotel has found it 
necessary to enlarge his building in order to ac- 
commodate his guests. He has let the contract 
calling for another story, which will make twelve 
additional rooms. Through close attention Mr. 
Duke has made his house one of the most popular 
in the city. 

Doctor (to patient who wants to be treated for 
impediment in his speech)— "Do you always stut- 
ter?" Patient— "O — o — only when I — I — talk." — 
Judge. 

The Steam Launch Meteor 

The engraving which appears upon the front 
page of this week's edition of the Graphic is made 
from a photograph of "The Meteor," one of the 
finest if not the very best steam launch to be 
found anywhere on the coast of Southern Cali- 
fornia. It is the property of Mr. H. D. Ryus, a 
young man of energy and enterprise, who has al- 
ways proven himself quick to see an opportunity 
for a successful business venture. With but very 
small capital he went to Long Beach early this 
year, had this launch built, noticing the demand 
which existed for it there, and has been doing 
an excellent business throughout the summer, con- 
veying pleasure seekers between Long Beach, Ter- 
minal Island and Catalina. Mr. Ryus has always 
been careful to see that all in his employ on the 



boat are gentlemen and anything in the nature of 
rowdyism or objectionable conduct on the part of 
any one in charge of or riding upon the boat is 
never tolerated. Hence ladies and gentlemen can 
feel safe at any time in going on any of its regu- 
lar cruises or fishing trips. 

In a number of races which have been given off 
Long Beach and Terminal Island recently the 
Meteor has repeated proven itself the most speedy 
boat on the water. The mechanical construction 
of the boat is thoroughly first class in every par- 
ticular and every care is taken to always maintain 
all its appointments in a thoroughly clean, tidy 
manner. 

For information concerning the boat, time of its 
regular trips, arrangements and rates for char- 
tered parties, etc., address Captain H. D. Ryus, 
Long Beach, Cal. 

J* jt 

A Soldier's Letter 

From the Philippine Iskvnds 

I MUST tell you of my good fortune in securing 
nine Remington rifles, one revolver and a 
shotgun, from natives who were not author- 
ized by us to carry them. They were secured 
through the Lieutenant of Police of San Isidore, 



who assisted me in the work. He received 30 
pesos each for them (the rifles) as this compensa- 
tion the government has agreed to give any one 
who surrenders, or gives information leading to 
the capture of arms. The "Amnesty Proclama- 
tion" also provides for the payment of 30 pesos 
for a gun in good condition, but the fact that it is 
intended to be a remuneration fails of its purpose 
inasmuch as the Insurgent soldier is told by the 
officers not to part with it, and as usual the tricky 
superior who makes arrangements when he finds 
he cannot hold his men together, to surrender 
them and he then tells his fellow soldiers to turn 
them in. They are usually hidden away and in a 
great many instances if this officer is hard pressed 
he will surrender them, and the person giving the 
information leading to the capture will usually get 
the money. If the officer decides to surrender, he 
gets all the money as the soldier is not consulted 
about his interest in the matter. In a great many 
instances the soldiers are responsible to some town 
official to whom the guns were turned over on the 
disbandment of the army. I think, however, that 
the proclamation is a timely one and cannot fail 
to bring about good results. Everything points 
to an improvement of conditions in every depart- 
ment of life and government and as General Bell 
remarked in a little Fourth of July speech "our 
social relations are improving;" of this I will 
speak later. The conditions arc improving, very 
much to your delight, I venture I hear you say; 
for I think that even now when the bare facts 
of the stupendous undertaking are at hand, I know 
that a power as well as we who have to face the 
conditions are not losing interest. There are 
many earnest and conscientious workers in these 
islands, who are laboring not only because It is 
so ordered, but because they realize their duty 



toward this people, and because they are so glad 
to represent the great "American" government, of 
which we are proud. You cannot realize what a 
pride we take in telling what the Americans have 
accomplished not because we are conceited but, 
because it is a fact." Our daily contact with these 
people is helping to cement the once uncordial re- 
lations into one of friendship; and we have every 
reason to hope we shall soon have set all troubles 
at naught and become fellow-workers for the good 
of all concerned. There are many capable people 
here and some well educated, in this town about 
half of the population can read and write. The 
question of government is one yet to be solved for 
these people, for they are themselves too depend- 
ent for independent action. Practical results, 
however, have been obtained and it makes one's 
blood thrill to see the bamboo school house flying 
the American Flag or the Town hall displaying the 
same. 

One instance of our progress may be noted in 
the passing of the Fourth of July. At Lingayen — 
as in many other towns — the day was enthusiast- 
ically celebrated. The square was well ordered 
and a surprising amount of flags and bunting was 
displayed. The exercises of the day began with 
the salute, and later a parade in which the Mayor 
of the town and other Filipino officials mounted 
on big American horses, took a part. It was the 



proudest time of their life. The regiment band 
furnished music and boat races, baseball, horse 
races and various field sports and Filipino pas- 
times were indulged in. The amount of firecrack- 
ers and other Fourth of July noise was surprising, 
and the natives were exceedingly entnusiastic in 
all the events. A great change over the preceding 
year, indeed, when the Fourth of July was not to 
any, save a few within the American line a thing 
yet realized. 

At the dinner at Headquarters .'Kith Infantry. U. 
S. V., Colonel William R. Grove, called upon Gen- 
eral J. F. Bell, for a toast on the occasion of the 
assembly and the General sounded the keynote of 
"our social relations" as "our patriotic duty of 
the present'' toward the Filipinos; he entertains a 
most liberal and hopeful view, and he was fol- 
lowed in a happy vein by Major Bishop, Mcaeham, 
Straub. Abernethy. Adjutant-General Harry Bell. 
Captains Steere. Williams, and others. There were 
five American ladies present. 

The eve ning arrived and enthusiasm ran as high 
as ever. Fully 400 Filipinos took an American 
Fourth of July dinner and most of them remained 
at the ball, where no barriers existed and the ut- 
most freedom in every way was observed. There 
were a large number of officers present and they 
certainly did their best to entertain their pretty 
dark-eyed senoritas. Of course the language is 
getting well under way and thus no difficulties 
were encountered. I do not hesitate to say it has 
left a good and lasting impression which we will 
see the fruits of in due season. 

I am quite well and hope you are ditto. I will 
touch up another subject soon. Sincerely your 
well-wisher, 

GEORGE J. ODEN. 
Second Lieut., 3tith Infantry, U. S. V. 



1 

T 




\ 

T 




UNITED STATES CRUISER NEW ORLEANS. 
Captain G. E. Ide, of the protected cruiser New Orleans, has sent a report to the de- 
partment at Washington that lias created a sensation of considerable proportions. The 
New Orleans is at Manila, and Captain Ide declares that, she is not suited for that service. 
He says: "It is undeniable that in certain localities about the coast of the island of Luzon 
previously unknown dangers may be disclosed at any time, and that smaller vessels with 
less draught would run less risk." Captain Ide says further: "Two reasons make it desir- 
able that this vessel should serve in a cooler climate than Luzon. Despite every precaution 
the temperature of the cordite magazines ranges from 92 to OK degrees, which is very near 
the danger point for that explosive." The New Orleans differs from any American-built 
war vessel. She was built in England for Brazil, and was bought from that country by the 
United fStates at the outbreak of thn war with Spain. The disclosures made by Captain 
Ide and others are more annoying because of the fact that the Albany is the sister ship of 
the New Orleans and is constructed upon the same lines, and, consequently, must have the 
same faults. 







OIiIhkI hikI l.»r|;M«l Kmik III SimiMi pm Cxliroruln 

FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK 

OF LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

CAPITAL (Paid up) »500,00u SURPLUS and KKHERVK 1891,742 
Total $1,426,742 

OFFICERS 

L W. HELI.MAN President 

H. W. HK. i.man Vice- Preside Dt 

H. J. FLEISHMAN Cashiei 

(4. HE1MASN Ast istaut Cashiei 

DIRECTORS 
«'. H. Perry ('. E. Thorn A. (ilassell 

<>. W.Childs I W. Hellman, Jr. I. N.Vau Nuys 
J. F. Francis H W. Hellman L W. Hellman 

49"Speclal Collection Department. Our safety deposit depart 
ment offers to the public, safes for rent In its new tire and 
burglar proof vault, which is the strongest, best guarded 
and best lighted In this city. 



W. C. Patterson, President 
M. P. Green, Vice-Preat. 



W. D. Wooi.wine, Cashier 

E. W. Coe, Asst. Cashier 



THE LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL 1(500,000 SURPLUS and Undivided Proflits, «100,000 
l ulled States Depositary 



Letters of Credit and Drafts issued available in all parts of 
the world. 

W. F. BOTSFORD, President J. G. MOSSIN, Cashier 

G. W. HUGHES Viee-I'res. T. W. PHELPS, Ais't Cashier 

CALIFORNIA BANK 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



DIRECTORS: 

W. F. Botsford G. W. Hughes R. F. Lotspeich 
W. H.Burnham E.W.Jones W. S. Newhall 
Homer Laughlin I. B. Newton H. C. Witmer 

Capital Stock $2.V),000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 35,000 

A General Banking Business transacted. 
Special attention civen to collections. 
Exchanges sold on all parts of the world. 



H. I. Wooi.lacott, President 
J. W. A Off, Cashier 



R. H. Howell, 1st Vice Pres. 
Warren Gili.ei.en, 2nd V. P. 



STATE BANK & TRUST CO. 

Of Los Angeles. 

PAID-UP CAPITAL HALF MILLION DOLLARS 

DIRECTORS: 



R. II. Howell J. W A. Off 

H. J. Woollacott K. F. Porter 

.I.A.Muir F. K. Rule 
Wm. M. Garland 



0. C. Allen 
A. W. Ryan 
Warren Gillclen 
L. C. Brand 



A General Banking Business transacted. Interest paid on 
Time Deposits. Safe Deposit Boxes for rent 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

MAIN STREET SAVINGS BANK 

Junction of Main, Spring and Temple St*. Temple Block 

''AP1TAI. STOCK SUBSCRIBED 1*00,000 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP 100.000 

Interest paid on deposits Money loaned on real estate only 

T. L. DUQUE President 

I N. VAN NtTYS Vi ^-President 

E. J. VAWTER, JR Cashier 

IMkkctoks— H. W. Hellman, Rasper Cohu, H. W. O'Melveuy 
U Winter, O. T. Johnson, T. L. Duque, L N. Van Nuys, W. G 
ttwrrkholT. \ Haas 



CHAS. B PIRONI 

Sole Proprietor 



Located at West Olendale 
Los Angeles county 



West Glendale Winery and Vineyards 

Producer and Grower of 

High Grade Sweet and Table Wines 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

TIME CARD 

Los Angeles and Redondo Ry. 

In Eff ct June 3, 1900 

Depot : Corner Grand Avenue and Jefferson street 



trains \nn Los Angeles for Redondo 


trains leave Redondo lor Los Angeles 


DAILY 


DAILY 


8.10 am 


7.00 am 


11.30 am 


10.00 am 


3.30 pm 


1.30 pm 


ii.3() pm 


5.00 pm 


•12 00 Night 


"11.110 pm 



•Wednesdays and Saturdays only. 

Connecting with Grand avenue or Main and Jeflerson street 
cars at Los Angeles. City Office: '246 S. Spring It Tel. M . 1031 

For rates on freight and passengers, apply at depot, corner 
Grand avenue and Jefferson st. Los Angeles Tel. West I. 

Sec Santa Fe schedule, tickets interchangeable. 

L. J. Pkrkv, Superintendent. 

The Pacific Coast Regalia Co. 

PK. TE1NN/ANT GRAY 

ManU o.. ct "' ere Military and Society Goods 



Western Graphic 
Stealing Rarvcho 

An Instance where Law worked Injustice 



r 



Flags, Banners, Badges, 
Uniforms and Swords 
Gold and Silver Trimmings 
Bullion Embroideries 



. . 1 I o . . 

WEST SECOND STREET 



[A true story, the characters of which will be 
recognized by many people in a near county to the 
north of Los Angeles.] 

HERE has probably been more stealing of 
lane! in California than in any other section 
of the country. It is not to be inferred 
from this that the people of the State are less 
honest than those in other portions of our com- 
mon country, for this has arisen from the great 
opportunities, under the Spanish grants, to stretch 
boundary lines, and from the further fact that the 
cheapness of land in the early times made people 
careless in regard to legal proceedings affecting 
land titles. It has been no uncommon thing for 
the American purchasers of Spanish grants to use 
the machinery of the law to extend the borders of 
the original grant so that they now include twice 
or more land than was originally ruled over by 
the Spanish dons. It is but just to the latter to 
say that they have not been implicated to any 
considerable extent in thus encroaching upon the 
public domain, for under their sway every one had 
all the land he desired. But the insatiate "grin- 
goes" were never satisfied — they always wanted 
more. 

One of the earliest methods of acquiring the 
ancestral lands of the Spanish grandees was by 
the marriage of Americans to their daughters. 
These marriages were not entirely mercenary, but 
many of the largest fortunes in California had 
their foundation in alliances thus made, in many 
cases the bridegrooms changing even their relig- 
ion to win the favor of the dark-eyed maidens. 

One of the most fruitful causes of litigation 
over land titles, however, came through the ef- 
forts of a class of lawyers who made money by 
stirring up litigation over these titles through 
some technical point of law — usually flaws found 
in the proceedings in probate courts where the 
rights of minor heirs were adjudicated. An in- 
stance of this kind lately came to the notice of 
the writer. 

Some thirty odd years ago a gentleman came 
with his young bride to California, and, after re- 
maining in the northern interior for some years 
came to a coast county and bought a large ranch 
of an estate belonging to a number of minor heirs, 
the eldest of which was not yet in her teens. The 
price paid for the ranch was a good one as prices 
then were, and the court, the administrator, and 
the heirs all thought the trade a good one. The 
owner proved to be an energetic man, who set 
himself to work to transform the desolate and 
uninviting sheep and grain ranch into one of the 
most delightful country residences in the State. 
While their children were growing to maturity he 
and his wife labored early and late to effect this 
change, planting trees, building a modern home, 
carrying water from the mountains to irrigate the 
land and make it blossom with the fruit and corn 
which so radically changes a California landscape. 
Time passed, with it came the attachments and 
memories which cluster around a home, but before 
the children grew up the father died and the 
widow was left with the cares of the family and 
a large estate to manage. In this she showed her 
Eastern training, and although with sorrowful 
heart she dutifully undertook the work, and keep- 
ing her growing brood around her, preserved for 
them the home which she and her husband had 
builded. 

In the meantime the children of the man to 
whom the land originally belonged were growing 
to maturity, and some time before the eldest, a 
girl, became of legal age, one of those attorneys 
who spend most of their time looking over the 
musty records of probate courts discovered that in 
the proceedings of the court in which the sale of 
the land was confirmed some one had omitted to 
cross a t or dot an i and that thereby the rights 
and equities of the infant heirs had been invaded. 
By insidiously presenting the matter to the eldest 
heir shortly after she had become of age he was 
allowed to commence a suit to have the sale set 
aside on grounds which were purely technical and 
t.nly concerned the omission to comply with some 
of the many requirements of the statutes which 
were made for the protection of infants. Of 
course he was to be rewarued for his success by 
a large part of the land in question for his disin- 
terested benevolence. 

Like all suits of the kind it encumbered the 
court calendars for years, going from one judge 
to another, until a host of lawyers and judges had 
looked at the case through their judicial spectacles 
to see if the alleged technicality did in reality 
exist, until finally the Supreme Court decreed that 
the widow and her children could no longer en- 
joy what the father and husband had rescued 
from the wilderness and made into a home, but 
must vacate it to the lawyer and the heirs of the 
former owner. 

Thus was accomplished a theft, brought about 
through the use of the law that is supposed to do 
equity. 

And now for the sequel. 

The widow and her children tearfully left their 



home, but happily having other resources were not 
reduced to poverty, and the successful heirs and 
the lawyer took possession. But in both casc;- 
the newly acquired acres brought them but little 
wealth and no happiness. To the latter it was but 
one of many instances of illy acquired gain, but 
to the former it has been a pandora's box of 
trouble, shame and worry. Although the attorney 
was to bear all the expenses of the law suit then- 
were so many items of expense "not nominated in 
the bond" that when the heirs came into posses- 
sion they found themselves harrassed by creditors 
to such an extent that large mortgages had to be 
placed upon their portion of the estate, the in- 
terest of which, through bad management, has so 
largely increased the dabt that the land could not 
now be sold for enough to satisfy the mortgage. 
The usual result in heavily mortgaged property 
has ensued. From tense fruitfulness it has de- 
generated to simply the raising of grain, and all 
the attractions which the care and labor of the 
ousted owners had made are gone. It carries the 
blight and decay of injustice and crime as plainly 
as they are marked upon the faces of the criminal 
or the mendicant. Soon the financial part of the 
tragedy will be closed and the title pass to new 
owners through the foreclosure of the mortgage. 

But its effects do not stop there. The heir 
through which the suit came experiences the far- 
reaching results In her daily life. The Spaniards 
as a race are a proud and haughty people, and the 
remnant of this nation living in California inherit 
these qualities. We cannot blame them for this. 
For over an hundred years the mission bells have 
tolled requiems over the graves of their ancestors, 
and from times long before this they trace their 
lineage back to the haughty dons who took part 
with the Emperor Charles V in the conquest of 
half of Europe, and later when war and religion 
were so closely allied, in the times of Philip I, 
that historians cannot trace the lines where car- 
nage and piety separated. They are punctilious 
for the observation of the demands of rank or 
family, and one of the ever present burdens of 
the present generation is the thought that their 
rate is dying out in this land where they former- 
ly were supreme. At the time of the trial the suc- 
cessful heir stood well in the community in which 
she resided. Her family had long been leaders 
among the old dons, and a remnant of this social 
position was still maintained. But the trial es- 
tranged most of her associates, so that wherever 
she went she felt the ostracism which it occa- 
sioned. This has embittered her life until she 
was forced to exclaim to one of her intimates: 

"What have I done that I should be treated so? 
True, I was led, by the insidious wiles of that 
crafty lawyer, to believe that I had been robbed 
out of my just dues, but then I was a young girl, 
easily led to wrong conclusions. It is hard that 
for this I should lose all my friends and be loathed 
as one who is unworthy to live. And this while 
he enjoys all the fruits of the contest." 

But such is the way of the world. The dregs of 
injustice are often drunk by those comparatively 
innocent. 

Longo 

Ladies 



The Ladies ' and Gentlemen ' s 



Has now the handsomest establishment of v 
jjc its kind in Southern California at 

222 S. Broadway 

It is in accord with the reputation of his jfe 
Garments. They are the recognized I 
Standard f 

Longo Gentlemen's 'Tailor I 



vvvvvvvvvv^vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv 

* DRINK * 

CLE IN ROCK 

* A Pure Mountain Sprint; 8 
' u-i- n«.. w i i- i-y . _ i iit . . m 



0 Main Office Newberry '8 Crystal Water 



* 2i6S. Spring St 

Winkle — "As I was sitting in a crowded car yes- 
terday, an old lady entered." Nodd — "And you got 
up and gave her your seat?" Winkle — "No; an- 
other man got ahead of me; but I had to wait for 
him for nearly five minutes." — Life. 



Absolute 
Guarantee 
Against Loss 

THE ORGANIZERS 
OF THE 

OPH I R 



OIL COMPANY 

Have arranged with the California 
Safe Deposit and Trust Company of 
San Francisco, to hold sufficient secur- 
ities in trust for the purchasers of 
Ophir Oil stock to 

Insure Holders of this Stock 
Against Loss .... 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Com- 
pany shall fail to produce oil in pay- 
ing quantities sufficient to bring its 
stock to par value ( one dollar per 
share), purchasers will receive back, 
with accrued interest, the entire 
amount paid in by them for stock. 

The securities thus held in trust are 
adequate, and an investment in Ophir 
Oil Stock is as secure as a United 
States Government Bond, and vastly 
superior to deposits in Banks of Sav- 
ings, for the reason that it combines 

Absolute Security 
with Immense 
Possibilities 
of Gain 

when oil is struck. There is no "read- 
ing between the lines" in this propo- 
sition. Whatever happens to the 
Ophir Oil Company your investment 
is safe. You cannot lose. Only a 
limited amount of this Secured Stock 
is offered for sale. Its propertv con- 
sists of 800 acres in Coalinga District, 
Fresno county, being all of section 23 
and % of section 14, township 21 south, 
range IS east, M. D. M. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

WARREN GILLELEN 

President Broadway Bank, Los Angeles 
JOHN W. A. OFF 

Cashier State Bank and Trust Co., Los 

Angeles 

JOHN MASON GARDINER 

Engineer and General Contractor of Pub- 
lic Works, PhoenlZ, A. T. , and I.os Angeles 

JOHN MARTIN 

President .Martin Pipe and Foundry Co. 
Mgr. Stanley Electric Co., San Francisco 

GEORGE KENT I OOPER 

Manager Occidental Hotel, San Francisco 

NATHANIEL J. M ANSON 

Attorney-at-Law, fan Franc'sco 

H. R. HURLBUT 

Fifteen yfars in charge of Advertising 
Department, San Francisco ( all 



Ophir Oil Co. 

Los Angeles Office 

435 Douglas Bldg. 

San Francisco Office, 

Room 14, Fifth floor, Mills Building: 



Western Graphic 




Under the Derrick 



T T seems that after all the trouble between the 
I oil exchanges is not to be settled by consolida- 
tion. The brokers are prone to fighting "as 
the sparks fly upward," and the dove of peace 
which has been hovering over Broadway, has 
flown to some more quiet retreat — perhaps gone to 
Pasadena, where the News and the Star no longer 
throw stones at each other. But these gentlemen 
should not think that because they can make a 
great noise and by following that other Chinese 
characteristic of making a big stink, that they can 
seriously affect the oil industry. If they would 



than ever before. Many companies who a few 
weeks ago were Ailing the newspapers with flam- 
ing advertisements for the sale of stocks, have 
abandoned this field in order to set the drill to 
work, and this work is now beginning to tell in 
the increased number of new wells. This feature 
of the situation will continue from this on, as 
hundreds of drills are now In operation through- 
out the State. 

tc^ t$ 

And the stock market is not so dull as the 
transactions on the exchanges would seem to indi - 



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Men Who Have Made the Oil Industry 



5--T. A. O'DONNELL 




'THOMAS ART HUB O'DONNELL belongs to that energetic class of "men in oil" who, 
* with no other capital than a Strong right arm, a clear head and a rustling 1 nature, 
have built up to comfortable competencies and laid the foundations for many handsome 
fortunes. "Tom"' O'Donnell was literally born in oil, his cradle being rocked by the walk- 
ing-beam of a drill and his youth was spent among the derricks in the Pennsylvania fields. 
Coming to California in the early !N)'s he was employed for some years as a driller by t be 
I'nion Oil Company at their Ventura county fields. When oil was discovered in the local 
field Mr. O'Donnell came to this city and in partnership with Mr. II. M. Whitticr com- 
menced business in contract drilling and operating in the field on his own account, meet- 
ing with marked success from the first. By hard, continuous work and perseverance be 
has built his fortunes step by step until at the present time, at the age of thirty, he occu- 
pies a position among the local operators that ranks well toward the head, lie is presi- 
dent of the O'Donnell Oil Company, in the Los Angeles field, of the fidelity Oil Company, 
with valuable holdings and good producing wells in the Whitticr section, and of the 
Whitticr Consolidated Oil Company operating in divers sections. W ith such cofidcncc is 
Mr. O'Donnell regarded in Los Angeles that when the first block of one hundred thousand 
shares of the latter company was placed on the market, the entire issue was subcribed for 
in small lots in four days. Mr. O'Donnell is also superintendent and manager of the 
llubbell Oil Company. 



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conduct their exchanges on business principles 
they might become of considerable use in furnish- 
ing a convenient medium for the sale of oil stocks, 
but all efforts to retard the oil business to any 
considerable extent will end in failure. Oil pro- 
duction has reached a stage where it does not de- 
pend upon the manipulation of stocks for its suc- 
cess. Its product has an established value, and 
the price of its securities will be fixed upon the 
earning capacity of its wells and not by any com- 
binations that may be made by brokers. 

Speaking of production, it may be well to re- 
member that notwithstanding -..is is the dull sea- 
son, more new wells are now being opened up 



cate. Some of the most reliable companies are 
selling shares almost as rapidly as in the height 
of the excitement of a month or two ago. It is 
true that buyers of stocks are more discriminating 
than formerly, but their faith in the continued 
success of oil production is as great as ever. 

Large transactions in oil lands are becoming 
very common. The recent sale of the Cook ranch 
at Piru will make a change in that section which 
will result In a large production of oil where here- 
tofore this has been Impossible on account of the 
peculiar ideas of the former owner. His methods 
of business would, perhaps, have been all right in 



6 



Western Graphic 



I Northern f 

1 Consolidated £ 

» ? 

| Oil and Mining i 

I Company i 



No. 2 



Dividend-Paying— 
Shares 1 0 Cents 



Over 12,000 Acres 

of Rich Oil Land 

The Northern Consolidated Oil and 
Mining Company No. 2 is the last of the 
CharlesVictor Hall dividend-paying oil 
properties which will be put upon the 
market. Its shares are of the par value 
of $1 each, fully paid up, and have been 
placed upon the market at the price of 

10 cents each. The Company starts out 
with the ownership of producing oil wells 
in the Los Angeles oil fields, which are 
now yielding a monthly production suf- 
ficient to pay regular dividends, which 
are expected to continue at the rate of 
5 per cent per month on the investment 
of 10 cents per share. 

In addition to this, it controls by pur- 
chase and leasehold 12,000 acres of rich 

011 laud in Los Angeles, Fullerton, and 
Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. 

The Company also owns two pumping 
plants, wells, and thirty city lots in city 
of Los Angeles and 80 acres in the Fuller- 
ton oil field. 

A Valuable Stock 

The stock of the Northern Consolidated 
Oil Company No. 2 has lieen placed upon 
the market on terms which will enable 
shareholders to realize dividends upon 
the money invested and ultimately be 
enabled to dispose of their stock at a 
large advance over the price paid for it. 

Liberal Terms 

When desired, loans will be made to 
responsible parties upon this stock, they 
receiving the dividends, for 75 per cent 
of the price asked for the shares. Thus, 

by paying 25 per cent of the cost ( 10 cents y 

per share; the balance can be paid in six C 

equal monthly installments, with interest A 

at the rate of 6 per cent per annum, the y 

purchaser to receive the monthly divi- I 

dend from the date of purchase of the r 
stock. The purchaser can at any time 

take stock for amount paid in. ^ 

If parties now purchasing stock at 10 * 

cents per share shall request the same, A 

the sa'e will be made on written condi- ij| 

tiou that the stock will, at the option 7 

of purchaser, at the end of one year, be jt 

received back and purchase money will ft 

be refunded on 30 days' notice, with in- \T 

terest thereon at the rate of 8 per cent p 

per annum, less dividends paid on same. i 

This is meant as a guarantee of the in- iff 

vestment. T 

Inquiries in regard to stock, etc., will £ 

be cheerfully furnished by addressing V 

CHARLES V. HALL 

PRESIDENT 4 

246-245 WILCOX BLOCK \ 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. $ 



patriarchal times, but when a man tries to make 
everybody conform to his ideas of morality or else 
not do business with him, he will soon find him- 
self casting up a balance on the wrong side of the 
ledger. If the alleged price paid for the ranch. 
$500,000, is the true one, the new owners will have 
to hustle to make it pay — unless most of it is in 
stock. This would be over $350 per acre, and a 
large part of it is mountain land, the only value 
cf which is for oil, and the amount which is avail- 
able for this purpose is yet to be determined. At 
half that price it would be a pretty tough finan- 
cial task to tackle. Another large transaction 
that has just been concluded is the sale of a large 
tract of valuable oil land in the Ojai valley in 
Ventura county by Senator Bard and his asso- 
ciates. It has been purchased by a syndicate of 
Los Angeles capitalists and oil men, and work will 
soon be begun on a large scale. 

The decision of a Santa Barbara Judge on the 
question of ocean front placer claims will have a 
tendency to stop a species of blackmail which has 
been attempted all along the coast wherever oil 
indications exist. He says that such title can be 
acquired only after a grant, in pursuance of law, 
yet to be enacted, from the State. In the Sum- 
mcrland field, where such claims have been made 
in good faith, this decision will probably work 
an injustice, which can only be righted by legis- 
lative action, but in most instances such claims 
have only been made with a view to cloud the 
title of land running to tide water. 

t<$8 

These speculators have overlooked one import- 
ant fact in reference to these claims, and that is 
that in Spanish grants the fee runs to low tide. 
As most of the ocean shore lands are under such 
grants the claim for the land between low and 
high tides will not hold. The final decision of the 
question will eventually go to the Federal Courts, 
it having been decided that the State courts only 
have jurisdiction over inclosed bays and inlets. 

(,$8 

A young man at Whittier has inaugurated a sys- 
tem for saving the oil which is intermingled with 
sand and lost because it is of too low gravity to 
be saleable. He has rigged up tanks into which 
the refuse of slump holes is pumped, and as the 
sand settles to the bottom the oil rises to the 
top and is drawn off. By this means he saves 
a large amount of oil which has heretofore been 
lost. It is surprising that some system of saving 
the larger portion of oil which has been allowed 
to run to waste from the oil wells and become a 



nuisance to people having occasion to visit such 
localities, has not been adopted. If some system 
were inaugurated for doing this on a large scale 
a large amount of oil could be saved. By heating 
the contents of the slump holes the sand would be 
released from the oil and by the same process the 
water intermixed would also be eradicated. It is 
a wonder that this has not been thought of be- 
fore. 

,<* j/t j| 

The success which has lately attended the open- 
ing up of new wells in the Ocean View district cf 
the Los Angeles field, shows that oil in that localty 
is not becoming scarce. The wells that have lately 
been drilled for Charles V. Hall give promise of 
becoming most excellent, producers, exceeding the 
expectations of the owners. 

M 

The withdrawal of much of the land which has 
been located for oil claims from market will have 
the effect to quiet the trouble between the locators 
and the strippers for a time, and will give Con- 
gress an opportunity to fix by law the status of 
such claims. Certainly the law should be made 
clear enough to prevent the confusion that now 
exists in reference .to such titles. 

,< J» j» 

The matter of the consolidation of the two oil 
exchanges appears to be reaching a settlement 
without the formal action of the two corporations. 
The fact that nearly all of the active members 
of the California Exchange have deserted that 
body and joined the Los Angeles Exchange, great- 
ly simplifies matters, for it leaves the former with 
nothing but the skeleton of an organization, and 
destroys its power to further disturb values of 
stocks. After such a wholesale desertion of mem- 
bers it will be impossible to rejuvenate the con- 
cern, and Mr. Scarborough and Caller Cannon will 
be almost alone in the new quarters where they 
are trying to conduct business. 

While there is apparent dullness in oil matters, 
as far as the sale of stock is concerned, there are 
many deals being negotiated which indicate that 
as soon as people get back from ihe seashore this 
dullness will be replaced by greater activity than 
ever seen before. Proffers of money to prosecute 
developments are being made to companies whose 
managements are in the hands of men of known 
character are quite frequent, and the stronger 
companies are even now having a remarkable de- 
mand for their stock. Schemes for getting in on 
the ground floor are not so popular as a few 
months ago, but there is no lack of money to car- 
ry on development work. 




Music and Art 

Criticism and Comment ^ &/>e Doings of Artistic Folk 




IT was one of our leading musicians who said 
very seriously and truly, that a large propor- 
tion of the human race, is practically deaf. 
Deaf, that is. to musical sounds. You come across 
people every day who "can't tell one tune from 
another," and are frank in avowing it, and you 
brush up against a host of pretenders at every 
concert which gives awed expression to apparent 
feelings of understanding and appreciation that 
are as false as the golden key at the end of the 
rainbow. One feels a great pity for the blind man 
who cannot see a beautiful painting, but you need 
a striking instance, like that of Beethoven, to de- 
velop that sentiment when it comes to a person 
who "just dotes on music." Even people with 
good, sharp eyes may look at a picture and see 
nothing more than the subject in it, just as there 
are any number of persons who are susceptible 
to the rhythm and a plain melody in a musical 
composition, and who are dull to the greater 
beauties that are uncovered to him who has 
trained ears that can hear. How many of our mu- 
sicians and music lovers are there who can segre- 
gate the instruments of an orchestra and study 
and follow each part; who know the color and 
scope of each individual instrument? Very few. 
Who is there, who looks for the design, the execu- 
tion, and the idea which often takes shape in half- 
misty forms; events and sounds that are the de- 
licious essence of a great work of art?. Again 
very few. And this in spite of the adjuration of 
the Son of Man, one of whose missions it was to 
"unstop deaf ears." 

Moszkowsky, relating his first experience in the 
elementary theory class in the Dresden Conserva- 
tory, said that the first question he was asked to 
give an answer to was "What is Music?" A little 
nine-year old shaver answered this momentous 
question for him by replying: "Music is pretty." 
In one sense the youngster was right, but the defi- 
nition was only applicable to good music. Bad 
music is far from being pretty. Yet the deaf ones 
in this w-orld applaud the good and ban indiscrim- 
inately, and there are often people so abnormally 
deaf that the bad or poor alone has the power of 
stirring them into activity. Tnen again there are 
shades of good music; some ot the good does not 
impress every one as being pretty. Music is an 
art which rests largely on tastes, and is therefore 
incapable of having the yardstick of mathematical 
demonstration applied to it. There is good music 
pud there is beautiful music. The logical way out 
of the tangle which these conceptions present is to 



consider the two-fold effect which music produces 
on the listener and his nerves. 

In music there are two features which impress 
most forcibly, ihe rhythmical arrangement and 
the height and depth of the tones in their relations 
with each other. The tone-line affects the mind 
while the tone-color has its effect on the ear. It 
has been known that badly balanced choirs or 
string quartets have essayed polyphonic works of 
great beauty with results painful to trained and 
sensitive listeners, but none the less the composi- 
tion afforded pleasure to the discerning ones, how- 
ever great the physical discomfort may have been. 
These knew what to look for; the other listeners 
were susceptible mainly to the weakness of tim- 
bre or tone-character. The expression of "color" 
is taken from the sister-art of painting, in which 
there may be a picture without color, but there 
can be no musical work without tone. It is true 
that there may be the written work, which to the 
mind's eye of many trained persons will give a 
fair idea of what the work will be like when per- 
formed with instruments or by the voice, but it re- 
ceives color only when it acquires sound by its 
performance. The ear plays no part in the sight- 
reading, which yields intellectual pleasure, purely, 
and it often happens that this pleasure, when the 
ear is called upon to share it, is sensibly dimin- 
ished. Contrapuntal beauties look better to the 
eye, sometimes, for when the voice progressions 
are given color they make one think, on occas- 
ion, that the composer might have done better. 
The critical sense, which has a high plane in such 
matters, comes into play and weighs that which 
it hears and is quite likely to find it wanting. A 
study of some of the works of the great com- 
posers will disclose that they often find it neces- 
sary, in the development of a complicated con- 
trapuntal problem, to sacrifice melodiousness; 
they are playing or living up to a theoretic stand- 
point of what is imperatively demanded of good 
music. Good music must, therefore, be able to 
stand the scholastic test which will be imposed on 
it by every one engaged in its study. Beautiful 
music, on the other hand, makes its appeal more 
directly to the ear; it aims to give a sensuous 
gratification, to divest itself as much as possible 
of the purely mathematical interest which at- 
taches to all good music. 

(Continued next week.) 

,* ,4 ,<* 

Mr. Edwin Clark and wife returned last Satur- 
day from their outing in Russian River Valley, 



Western Graphic 



7 




The Tone of the Kimball Piano 

Secures the attention, holds it mid impresses the lint- 
Oner as does the voice of some gifted oraior. And once 
heard, it is ever after tin- standard by which oilier 
pianos are. judged. It is an instrument of peculiar 
sweetness and beauty of tone, yet possessing great 
strength and volume. Mechanically and music- 
ally perfect. 

AGENCY WITH 

The Bartlett Music Co, 

233-2^ S. Broadway 



Agency of The Angelua Self-Playing Piano. 

EVERYTHING IN MUSIC 



ED U CATIONAL 

f Brownsberger 
Home School .... 



«: Shorthand and Typewriting 4 

9 903 South Broadway. Tel. White 4871 $ 

& This institution owns the largest number 
9 of typewriters of any school in California - 

i Touch method in typewriting exclusively. More posi- 

3j tions are offered to the school at a go d salary than 

C we can fill. Only individual work. Office training. • 

m Machine at home free. Hours 9 to 12; 1.30 to 4.30 

| SPECIAL SUMflER RATES 

** ** ******** * * **** **** ******** 

) Los /J/)Qe/&6 t) n «• 



212 W. Third St. Tel. Black 2651 

•J Oldest, largest and best training school in the city. 4? 
3f Thorough, practical courses of study in Bookkeeping, 

3f Shorthand, Typewriting and Telegraphy. College i£ 

trained and experienced teachers. Best equipped ifc- 

4f Business College room West of < hicago. This is the it? 

only school in the city that lms the right of using the #> 

Budget of Voucher System of Bookkeeping. Come and £ 

•i see it. Our students have the advantage of Spanish, ijr 

Ht German and Lou V. Chapin's Course of l ectures free, ife 

■i It will cost you nothing to investigate the merits of A 

■i 0U< school before going elsewhere. Special rates for 4p 

■i the summer. Catalogue and full information on ap- is- 

if plication. Address * 

J I.. A. Bnalnea* College. 212 W. Third St., L. A. * 
»-l}.» »» 1 » |< 

I os \ngeles 
| Military Academy 

^ Begins its seventli year September 25th. 

* Classical, English and Scientific Courses. 
9 The common branches thoroughly taught. 
( Prepares for business. 
2 Sanford A. HOOPER, Head Master 

• Edward L. Hardy, Associate 
^ Catalogue mailed upon request. Visitors f 
? take Westlake (First street) Traction cars. *i 



Los Angeles SGhool 
o! Dramatic Art . . . 



Incorporated Sept. 18!i9 



Tel. James 71 1 



Training for the Platform, I'ulpit and Stage. Cultivation of 
the Speaking Voice for every purpose. 

Directors— G. A. Dobinson, John D. Hooker, W. C. Patter- 
son, B. R. Baumgardt, Sheldon Borden. 

The Art Building, «14 S. Hill St., Lot Aiigele* 

"He said he'd sign the paper, but every time I 
put it under his nose he has some excuse." "Per- 
haps the gentleman doesn't write with his nose." 
■ — Judge. 



Sonoma county. While there, they visited the fa- 
mous Bohemian Grove, wnere the Bohemian Club 
Of San Francisco hold their yearly "high jinks." 
Mr. Clark is enthusiastic in his praise of the coun- 
try for camping, the grand pine and oak groves, 
with their trni.ing moss and pleasant brooks and 
canyons having quite captivated his artistic feel- 
ings. 

< «l < 

Ragtime music has at last reaeued the pinnacle 
where but a single step will bring it into that 
new and better world, where white robed angels 
with golden wings placidly pick the harpstrings 
from early dawn to dewy eve. The chimes of old 
St. Michael's at Charleston, S. C, have taken up 
"tid included in an already extended repertoire of 
the classics, "I Guess I'll Have to Telegraph My 
Baby," "Oh, Mr. Johnson. Turn Me Loose," 
"There'll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town To- 
night.' - and "I Ain't Got No Happy Home to 
Leave." with others to be added that are now in 
active rehearsal. Any one contemplating a speedy 
departure from this world of grief in order to en- 
joy the delights of picking old hymn tunes on well 
: easoned harp strings, had better remain just 
where they are. The "ragtime" may possibly slip 
In ahead. Strange things have happened since the 
apple episode. 

J* ,< ■< 

The old adage, "It is not always gold that glit- 
ters," is being applied to Sousa and his band with 
a vengeance in Continental Europe. At first, the 
peculiarly Sousanesque character of the music per- 
formed, joined to the lavish and unflagging pro- 
duction of fortissimo tone vibrations, created a 
sensation of wonderment and awe in the bosoms 
of our foreign cousins. The very audacity and 
novelty of the, to them, new phenomenon, pro- 
duced a feeling of nervous exhilaration both mys- 
terious and prostrating. As the attack wore off, 
the antics of Sousa and the high-keyed perform- 
ance of the band slowly settled into their proper 
proper sphere, both musically and artistically. 
The consensus of opinion among the musicians 
and amateurs of the French capital, is summed up 
in three words by the Paris correspondent of the 
New York World, "barbarously boisterous noise." 

Arthur Bird, the well-known musical critic, con- 
tributes the following in the columns of the Musi- 
cal Record of Berlin, relative to the visit of the 
March King and his band to that city. "His man- 
ner of conducting is quite on a level with most of 
his notes, namely, a combination of poses, well- 
known gesticulations (including ploughing the air 
in squares, circles and triangles), snake-like twist 
ings and squirmings of the spinal column, and a 
too evident desire to attract and amuse the young 
girls and their silly mothers." 

The low estimate placed upon Sousa's musician- 
ly and artistic acquirements and the work of his 
men, by the musical critics and savants of the old 
world, will be a shock to the blindly enthusiastic 
admirers of the writer of marches in this country. 
S & £ 

Park Band Concerts 

Westlake Park, Sunday, August 12th, 2:30 p. m. 

Grand March — Coronation Meyebeer 

Waltz — Fortune Teller '. Herbert 

Selection — Nabucco Verdi 

Negro Characteristics — The Plunkville Sere- 
nade Laurendeau 

Brazillian Dance — Ninette Oorbin 

Intermezzo — Hearts and Flowers Tobani 

Overture — Norma 4 Bellini 

Medley — Introducing "Always," "Just as the 

Daylight," etc .. . Mackie 

Patrol — The Passing Regiment Coverley 

National Melody Potpourri Heinecke 

,< .< jl 

Hollenbeck Paik, Sunday evening, August 12th, 
7:30 p. m. 

March — The Advance Syd. Smith 

Waltz — Campus Di earns Blake 

Characteristics — The Mill in the Forest. .Eilenberg 

Nutmeg Dance Ellis 

Darkies Patrol Lansing 

Fantasie — Felice Langey 

Dance Caprice Bergenholtz 

Selection — The Jolly Musketers I. Edwards 

Songs from the Orpheum Mackie 

Medley ol American National Songs. 
Green and yellow Traction cars run direct to 
park. 

jl ,<* j| 

Mr. Thilo Becker, writing from Jersey, England, 
to Mr. Bartlett of the Bartlett Music Company, 
states that he expects to be in Los Angeles by the 
first week in September. He also gave his order 
for a Steinway Grand for his studio. It will be 
specially selected for Mr. Becker's use and will 
add another to the fine list of instruments fur- 
nished the profession by the Bartlett Music Com- 
pany. This has been a great week with them, as 
several of our citizens have purchased Steinway or 
Weber Grands. One of the handsomest Baby 
Grands ever brought to this city, a specially fine 
San Domingo mahogany Weber, of new and ex- 
quisite design, valued at $1150, was purchased by 
Prof. C. W. Harris, and placed in the music room 
of his new residence. 

Jt :* Jl 

Aristocrats and dentists are judged by the excel- 
lence of their extraction. 



MUSIC AND ART ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 

VOICE 

COMPOSITION 
TH KOKV 



Phone Main 885 



'.Ml Hki. I.MAN Block 



ARNOLD 



K R A U S S 



SOLOIST AM) VIOLIN TKACHKIt 

Pupil ol Cesar Thomson 
8tudio: 807 W. SeTeuth st. Tal. (ireeu 1558 



HARLEY 



HAMILTON 



CONCKIIT VIOLINIST AND TEA CH Kit 

Ensemble playing a specialty. 
Musical Director I.os Angeles Theatre. 
Pupil of Emile Sauret, London, and Slmonettl, London 



BtUdiO, 820-821 Blauchard Building 



CHARLES 



E D S O N 



BASSO CANTANTK 

Engagements Accepted for 

Concert, Oratorio Studio 
and Opera ... 611 WITMEK STREET 

Telephone James 78 



MORTON F. MASON 

Teacher of Piano, Organ and Harmony 

Organist Pasadena Presbyterian Church 
Studio: Blauchard building Residence: 250 State Street 

Los Angeles Pasadena 



MISS MIRIAM B. BARNES 

Piano Soloist and Teacher of the Piano 
Pupil of 

Herr Thilo Becker 253 SOUTH GRAND AVE 

MRS. LUCIA M. BURNETT 

PIANO SOLOIST AMI TEACH KB 

Pupil Wm. Sherwood, Chicago 100i> W. Washington St. 

CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

HARMONY COUNTKRI'OINT 
COMPOSITION VIOLIN 

Studio Tajo Block, cor. 1st A Brd'y Residence 632 Burlington 

MRS. J. M. JONES 

TKACHKK OF THE HARP 

Address care of So. Cal. Music Co. RESIDENCE: 
216 W. Third St., Los Angeles Lincoln Park 



MADAME MARIE HUNI 

TKACHKIt OP SINGING 

Classical Music a Specialty. 
Studio, f>28 S. Hill Street Los Angeles 

D. H. MORRISON 

VOICE UCILI'INO 

77 and 7s Potomac Block Los Angeles, Cal. 

MISS MAUDE PRIEST 

(ill IT A R LESSONS 
Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution. Rapid Progress 
Pupil M . S. Atcvalo STUDIO: 452% So: Broadway 

Room 25 



A. 



WILLHA. RTITZ 



Piano, Harmony, Com. position, Klc. 

LosANOEI.ES 311 BLANCIIARI) MUSIC AND ART BLDO. 

E D W A R D S. W A R REN 

MANDOLIN AND OU1TAK 

STUDIO— 314 Blauchard Music Mail 
Mornings st Pasadena Dir.'doi Throon Institute 

Afternoons at I os Angeles Mandolin and CultarClub 



ROLLA K. GARDNER 

ItANJO, MANDOLIN. OUIT X R 

String Orchestra Sit' to 244 South Hill Ht 



Liianchard Hall 



223 S. Broadway 

Opp. City Hall 

Building devoted to Music and Art. 

Auditorium, seating 800, can be engaged for Music 
ales. Receptions, Lectures, Dances, elu. 

Rehearsal and Lecture Rooms for rent. 

Korty Studios— single and en suite. 

Public Art Oallery open dally, 1 to 4 p. m. 
For any information apply to 

F. W. BLANCHARD 



t LADIES 



Have your Freckles Removed 

By U8lng 11,0 Original Freckle Salve 

PREPARED only by 

O. F\ HE1NZE/V\A1N 

•ft* North CHKMIST 

Main Street V.»n Price SO CtS. 



To the Deaf 

A /lch lady, cured of her deafness and noises In 
the head by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear DrumB, 
gave $100,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people 
unable to procure the Ear Drums, may have them 
free. Address No. 532c, The Nicholson Institute, 
780 Eighth Avenue, New York. 5-7-01 



GARDENING 
^CALIFORNIA 




* 



156 PAGES 

Jmg' II.I.USTRA'D 

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covers : : : 



TTHE ONLY WORK 
* ever written for this 
soil and climate; entirely 
non- technical and espe- 
cially adapted to amateurs. 
Heretofore sold at 50 CtMS, 
will be reduced to close 
out an edition to 

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and three cents postage. 



AT ALL 
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GEO. RICE & SONS, inc. 

311-313 
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YOU SHOULD GO TO 

CAMP 
CORONADO 

. . . The Society Center of the Pacific 
Coast. Reached in four hours from 
Los Angeles on the regular trains or 
still quicker on the 

CAMP 

CORONADO FLYER 

Leave Los Angeles 7.05 a. m. 

Arrive San Diego 10. +5 a. m. 

Returning Special 

Leaves San Diego 5.10 p. m. 

Arrives Los Angeles K.ISO p. m. 

Only passengers for Coronado Beach 
carried on this special. 

ROUND TRIP $4.00 

Ticket Office Second and Spring Sts. 




A Tempting 
Proposition 



TEN-CENT OIL STOCK 

A better one is a f2C00 Life Insur- 
ance forflfi a year in the popular 

Order of The Iroquois 

incorporated under the laws of 
the State of New York. For par- 
ticulars and literature send card 
to T. M. CHAPMAN 

250 N. Union Ave., L. A. 

V3~ Deputies make good pay. 
Several wanted for this territory. 

,\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\S\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\W 

I 

The I 

Summer \ 
Man 

g is as much of a necessity as the summer £ 

i girl, and needs a proportionate amount i 

g of attention. See our novelty flannel \ 

I negligee suits, as low as $10.00, and g 

I all the fixings that go well with them. ; 

LONDON CLOTHING COMPANY I 

HARRIS & FRANK, Profs. 

I 17-125 North Spring Street % 

^A\\\\\\\\\\\\\V\\\\\\\\W 

All We Ask is Comparison 

of Goods and Prices 



Sew Carpets and Rugs 

Suits Hundreds of others and will suit you 

3x7 Shades only 45 Cents 

I. T. MARTIN **-f&1& 




Western Graphic 
J5he French "Fourth" 

A Ga^y Time in PslHs on Jvily 14 



By BEN. C. TRUMAN 



Wheel Chain 
SPRING ST. sold or rented 



Furs stored, mad« to order and remodeled 
D. Bonoff, 247 S. Broadway, opp City Hall 



PARIS. France, July 17. 1900. 

1CALL to mind that among the many sights 
of my life, exclusive of great military and 
naval reviews and such magnificent battles as 
Missionary Ridge, Nashville, Franklin, Peach-tree 
creek, Atlanta and Stone River, have been Sher- 
man's army marching up Pennsylvania avenue, 
Washington; the arrival of Rex in New Orleans in 
1S85, the year of the Exposition; the Queen's Jubi- 
lee celebration in London in las", a Battle of 
Flowers in Nice, the Fiesta in Los Angeles in 1895, 
and the return of the California Volunteers to 
San Francisco in September, 1899. But if I were 
asked what has been the most gorgeous, exciting, 
joyous, magnificent and wonderful of all I would 
unhesitatingly say — "the 14th of July celebration 
in Paris in 1900." 

There was a chain of brilliant circumstances 
commencing with the military review, and ev- 
olution of 30,000 men of all arms before the Presi- 
dent of the republic at Longchamp to the incom- 
parable illuminations and pyrotechnical displays 
that made over the ever-sparkling city into a huge 
diamond of light. It was the greatest of all the 
national fetes that Paris has ever enjoyed, engen- 
dered by its greatest exposition and by the pres- 
ence of such masses of foreigners as it had never 
held before. Like the lark the city was up bright 
and early and at once indulged in song. And with 
the exception of a few fainting cases in the Place 
de la Concorde ..tiring a monster crowd in the 
evening, there was no hitch in the proceedings or 
untoward circumstance of any kind. There had 
been many troubles — there always are in Paris on 
all such occasions, and generally traceable to So- 
cialist newspapers and to small politicians who 
too frequently mix their execrable absinthe with 
their cheap beer — but these rumors only served to 
give the Prefect of Police, the best that Paris has 
ever had, a chance to more numerously patrol 
all salient points, which he did admirably and 
judiciously. 

At the Cascade, Bois de Boulogne, the show of 
military and police force was very strong. Dra- 
goons were on one side and a detachment of gen- 
darmes on the other. The police were everywhere. 
Probably the larger portion of the total police 
force on duty yesterday in Paris (about 3,400 men) 
was stationed In and about the Bois during the 
review. 

Numbers of Socialists marched in groups 
through the Bois to witness the review. These 
for the most part wore red wild roses in their 
button-holes. They sang "La Nacionale," and 
some went so far as to start singing "La Carmag- 
nole," but they were persuaded to desist. The 
principal cries were "Vive la Nationale!" "Vive la 
Sociale!" and "Vice la Republique!" What seem- 
ed an unusual precaution on the part of the po- 
lice was the searching of every cab that passed 
through the Bois, with the exception of those 
which carried well-known personages. M. Lepine, 
the excellent Prefect of Police, was at the Cas- 
cade before and after the Presidential party ar- 
rived. 

The Presidential party passed the Cascade with- 
out incident. The President of the Republic (M. 
Loubet) had on his right General Andre, Minister 
of War, and in front General Bailloud, Chief of the 
Military Household, was seated. 

In a few words I will say that the military re- 
view was incomparably brilliant. On his arrival 
at the grand stand President Loubet was very well 
received by the crowd. Along the whole route 
from the Elysee to Longchamp. th President was 
respectfully greeted with cries of "Vive Loubet!" 
"Vive la Republique!" One man who cried "A bas 
Loubet!" was arrested. 

As soon as he left the carriage, General Andre, 
Minister of War, mounted a splendid horse that 
was waiting for him and went to take up his posi- 
tion at the saluting base. At 4:30, after the 
charge of cavalry, which was led by General Bru- 
gere, the President left his box, and, amidst a 
scene similar to that which characterized his ar- 



rival, drove off to the Elysee. His reception from 
the crowd on his way home was even more cordial 
than the one he had received going to Longchamp. 

In the evening the City of Paris gave a garden 
party to all within its gates. Never before has 
there been such an illumination of houses, parks 
and avenues. The Whole city was in a blaze of 
light. The place de l'Etoile was very beautiful. 
All the trees surrounding the Arc de Triomphe 
were festooned with big artificial flowers, princi- 
pally representing marguerites in various colors, 
with electric lights in the centers. Tens of thou- 
sands of Chinese lanterns were also hung in the 
trees, which added greatly to the effect. The Arc 
itself was not as on other evenings, in up by the 
Eiffel Tower searchlight, but had its own illumina- 
tions, which answered the purpose much better. 

Looking from the place de l'Etoile towards the 
place de la Concorde, one could easily have imag- 
ined oneself in fairyland. On each side of the 
Champs-Elysees were myriads of gas-lamps, hav- 
ing the effect of long rows of little white-lighted 
spheres. Here, also, the trees were festooned with 
Chinese lanterns. The Champs-Elysees were so 
well lit up in this way that one could read a book 
at midnight anywhere without difficulty. 

At the Round Point, the greater number of the 
trees gave more scope for illuminating. Here the 
fountains were never more beautiful, the basins 
being encircled with gas jets, which gave the fall- 
ing water a soft and feathery effect. 

There were a great number fashionably dressed 
ladies and gentlemen sitting in carriages along the 
Champs-Elysees, looking at the illuminations and 
watching the fireworks in the distance. Here and 
there in the avenue des Champs-Elysees people 
sat in the middle of the street, as if in a cafe. 
They brought chairs from under the trees, and 
laughingly defied the cabmen to come near them. 

At the place de la Concorde there was a fright- 
ful jam. It was the people's holiday, and the 
people were on foot and everything on wheels had 
to wait. The place de la Concorde was lit up 
"regardless of expense," and the illuminations 
about the obelisk were never more lavish. They 
consisted of pyramids of green lights, monograms 
of the French Republic, and devices representing 
stars. 

The rue Royale celebrated the fete with arches 
across the street, hung with the same artificial 
flowers, with electric lights in the center, as in 
the place de l'Etoile. The Madeleine was re- 
splendent with gas jets, and towered majestically 
above its surroundings. 

The boulevards were illuminated in the same 
way as the rue Royale. The Grand Cafe, the 
Grand Hotel and the Cafe de la Paix were partic- 
ularly striking in appearance, and the California 
headquarters at 8 place de l'Opera was as bright 
as ever, the dome of the Opera House being very 
effectively lit up. 

The rue de la Paix was brilliant in illuminations 
The Avenue de l'Opera showed off well, with its 
wide thoroughfare lit up with electric lights and 
the outlines of its great buildings brought out by 
innumerable gas jets. 

There were hundreds of bands scattered all over 
the city that played dance music until daylight, 
and hundreds of thousands of people danced all 
over the streets. Imagine, if you can, the entire 
length of Figueroa street — with here and there a 
hand — taken up with people waltzing — and more 
than waltzing, because high kicking is not a past 
art. 

In conclusion I would say that all things were 
propitious. The weather was superb, the review 
passed off without any disturbance to public order, 
the illuminations were fairy-like, the fireworks 
were magnificent, and the people who thronged the 
streets were laughing, happy, contented, satisfied. 
They would have been hard to please if they had 
not been. 

And even if you do not care to dance in the 
street yourself, you must be a misanthrope if the 
sight of all the balls at the street corners does 
not exhilarate you and predispose you to enjoy 
yourself. 

Altogether, the fete was a great success. Poli- 
tics had a very small show. Merriment and good- 
nature were to the fore. Policemen, when not pro- 
voked by an isolated agitator, were polite, and 
even cabmen seemed to be infected with the pre- 
vailing good feeling. 

The fire crackers seemed to cause some appre- 
hension to the cab-horses, which, perhaps, enjoyed 
the fete less than anyone. 

The crowd in the Champs-Elysees and the place 
de la Concorde after dinner was the biggest on 
record. BEN C. TRUMAN. 



Western Graphic, 



9 



LONG B 



ns?n£ An all the 

MANY Easterners have been heard to ex- 
press themselves that, considering the 
marvellously mild and balmy summers of 
Southern California, where the shade of a tree or 
a porch is always pleasantly cool, there should be 
little desire for the cooler breezes of the seashore. 
But it is the same here as in every other place 
on earth, the genus homo is never entirely con- 
tented, and siezes every opportunity for a new 
environment or a new sensation. Then there are 
the hard-working people from the city whose va- 
vations are taken largely from the business stand- 
point of building up bodies and brains for another 
year's tussle with the world. And from the far 
inland cities of Arizona and New Mexico there 
comes a large clientele to while away summer 
days far from the glare of the desert sun. An- 
other numerous contingent that makes our resorts 
so populous during July, August and September 
is the well-to-do, whose very existence is given 
up to enjoying the best there is in the world, and 
these people build fine houses or by their patron- 
age make possible the fine hotels. On the whole 
southern coast line, no point can boast of a more 
even and regular population, summer or winter, 
than Long Beach. A great many people own their 
own cottages, and year after year one may see the 
same faces on the boulevards and on the beach, 
supplemented by the ever-changing one week to a 
month visitors and the enormous Saturday and 
Sunday crowds. 

The history of the town of Long Beach is much 
like that of every other settlement of this west- 
ern country — a dreary waste, a short application 
of brains and muscle, a thriving, productive set- 
tlement. It was only eighteen years ago that the 
topography of the land and the apparent richness 
of the soil on the ocean side of the old Cerritos 
Rancho, then owned by the Bixbys. attracted the 
eye of W. E. Wilmore, who soon afterward ac- 
quired the tract comprising the greater part of the 
present city of Long Beach. With an energy born 
of the greatest enthusiasm Mr. Wilmore began the 
building of the city of Wilmore, as it was orig- 
ina.ly christened, and after platting the tract sold 
lots and induced a number of people to build 
homes. Early in the babyhood of Wilmore the 
"boom" struck Southern California and steam car 
connection was made with the San Pedro branch 
of the Southern Pacific, some three miles west 
from the town. Though short-lived this road fur- 
nished much amusement for the people and many 
people of the early eighties can relate humorous 
reminiscences of experiences on the trip from the 
junction to Long Beach. The engine was evidently 
a consumptive, for on many occasions it was found 
necessary to stop the train while the engineer 
filled the boiler with a water uucket and got up 
steam. At other times when the locomotive be- 
came weak and would give a dying snort and halt 
on an up grade, the male passengers would alight 
and push the train over the hummock. This was 
such a common occurrence that the road became 
known as the "Get Off and Push" line, conveni- 
ently abbreviated to the "G. O. P. Ry." 

With the advent of the railroad came a com- 
pany which constructed a large hotel on the bluff, 
at once insuring the permanency of the new town, 
and encouraging many more families to buy and 
improve property. A few years since the hostlery 
was destroyed by fire, which many believe to have 
been a benefit to the town rather than an irrepar- 
able loss, through the fact that a resort grown 
up about one big caravansary often secondary to 
the real attraction, and is apt to become a place 
of fashion, as against the ideal summering place, 
where families and individuals of moderate means 
many enjoy themselves untrammeled by the re- 
quirements of style and society dictates. 

Two years after the projection of the town on 
paper the property passed into the hands of the 
Long Beach Land and Water Company, which 
changed the name of the place to Long Beach, and, 
with plenty of money at hand, inaugurated an 
era of development. A pathetic point may well 
be here noted. Mr. Wilmore, who first conceived 
the idea of the city by the Pacific, turned his at- 



EACH 

Year R^esort ^ 

tention to a big realty enterprise in Texas. Never 
cf a very robust constitution he suffered a sun- 
stroke in that State, which affected his brain to 
such an extent that he lost his all. and is now a 
helpless incompetent at the County Farm, within 
sight of the now beautiful city he was instrument- 
al in first bringing to light. 

One of the strong points always used as an in- 
ducement for the purchase cf land in Long Beach 
was the clause in every deed making the property 
revert to the original owner in the event of liquor 
in any form being manufactured, sold or used 
thereon. In time the matter was overcome by the 
saloon men. and for several years the fight has 
been waged at each municipal election over the 
question of saloon or no saloon, with varying re- 
sults. Last April the antis again won, and to- 
day Long Beach is known as a "dry town." On 
all other points the people of Long Beach have 



everything necessary for the study of the branches 
pursued in the High schools of the State. 

It is truthfully said that Long Beach is pre- 
eminently the religious and educational town of 
the Southwest. The schools are the natural 
growth of the progressive policy cf Americans. 
Then there is the Chautauqua Association, which 
every summer enjoys a week or more of study 
and recreation peculiar to the organization. It is 
semi-religious, but embraces a line of practical 
study, the effect of which has been felt all over 
the United States. The leading men and women 
in literature, music, art, etc., are engaged to iec- 
ture and direct the studies of the members, and 
the social diversions are arranged to the great at- 
traction of the visitors. Soon after the establish- 
ing of Long Beach the Chautauqua Association 
was presented with a gift deed to four choice 
blocks, upon which they have erected suitable 
buildings for their purposes. 

The Methodist camp meetings attract hundreds 
of people of that denomination every season. In 
addition, other ecclesiastical gatherings of greater 
or less note are of annual occurrenc?. Seven de- 




i— C. j. Walker, Pre», Board of Trustee* - — k. <;. Riivenscroft, Tnutw :«— |. c. linker, Marshal +— T. a. Stephens, 

Trustee Chns. L.^llartwell. Tre;i». <> — J, A. Tcel. Street Sii|>t. 7—3. O. Long. Att'j s— W. It. Julian, Clerk 

CITY OFFICIALS OF LONG BIOACH 



stood nobly together, and have responded to every 
suggestion for progress and improvement, which 
is evidenced by the commodious pleasure pier and 
wharf out to 30 feet of water, the pavilion on 
piles out over the snrf — an annex to the pier with 
capacity for 3000 people — the grand and commodi- 
ous city hall — the public library block — Ocean 
avenue, graded and curbed from end to end — the 
Pacific Park and other improvements. 

Above every other town in the county Long 
Beach has cause to be proud of its schools, filled to 
overflowing with interestingly bright and intelli- 
gent boys and girls. The High school is the es- 
pecial pride of the people. It is a large, imposing 
brick building of the Mission style of architecture, 
modern in every detail, and fitted with the best of 



nominations, owning their own houses of worship, 
are represented. 

In the original planning of the town provision 
was made for pleasure grounds on a grand scale, 
and today a large park of extraordinary beauty 
and unusual accommodations graces the heart of 
the settlement, overlooking the Pacific. It is here 
that many picnic parties spread their luncheons 
in the cool shade, and. with a superbly kept lawn 
for their table, with the music of the sea for an 
orchestra, and the fresh ocean breezes for an ap- 
petizer, indulge In gastronomic pleasures that 
could not be afforded by the most magnificent 
banquet. 

The beach at Long Beach is the most beautiful 
and is the safest on the Pacific Coast. The frail- 



L2 



Western Graphic 



est child and the aged as well as the strong and 
robust have equal pleasure and safety in bathing 
in the surf, and some indulge their fondness for 
salt water bath.ng both summer and winter. 

No coast point can boast of better transporta- 
tion facilities than Long Beach. The Terminal 
railway is a standard guage road of light equip- 
ment and a well-made roadbed, making possible a 
fast service to and from Los Angeles. It passes 
through Long Beach on to Terminal Island, 
the Brighton beach of the Southwest. The South- 
ern Pacific Company has a branch line connecting 
with the San Pedro road, and it is only necessary 
to give the name of the company to suggest the 
comfort of its service. 

To say that, topographically, there is a seaside 
resort in California which possesses all the at- 
tractive characteristics of its rivals with few, if 
any, of their disadvantages, is a broad assertion 
indeed. With judgment based on actual observa- 
tion and study, however, the writer is fully satis- 



the accommodation of those who enjoy boating and 
trolling for fish. Many snug little cat boats and 
yachts may be seen off the coast every day and in 
the evening there is a perfect flock of them 
bobbing up and down at anchor near the wharf, 
the disciples of Isaac Walton have every oppor- 
tunity to gratify their ambitions from the sides of 
the wharf and old ocean gives up the finny tribe 
with endless genercsity. 

At Long Beach there are unsurpassed facilities 
for home-building amongst a class of people of 
the most refined tastes and pronounced culture. 
It has long been famed as the chief of resort 
cities, and it is the choice of thousands of people 
who seek an orderly place for their families dur- 
ing the summer months. Hence, it doubtless will 
become the choice of thousands who will seek 
business opportunities at the great harbor which 
will open commercial relations with the entire 
world, and whose residences will be built at Long 
Beach. 




SCENES ON THE LINE OF THE LOS ANGELES TERMINAL RAILWAY 



ned that such a characterization may be applied 
to Long Beach, one of the numerous beautiful 
pleasure resorts that fringe the Pacific-washed 
shores of Los Angeles county. Tempered by the 
cool breezes from the sea in summer and pro- 
tected from fierce winds by towering sentinel-like 
hills in the background in winter, the climate is 
rendered as salubrious and congenial as can be 
found anywhere. Long Beach is thus made ten- 
able with as equal comfort and pleasure during 
the winter season as in summer. A realizing 
sense of this fact has succeeded in directing the 
attention of winter tourists to this point during 
the past season or two and we are satisfied that 
we are not unreasonably enthusiastic when we 
express the conviction that but few seasons will 
have passed before the immense throngs that visit 
this beach in summer will be duplicated through- 
out every season of the year. 

With a magnificent twelve-mile stretch and al- 
most imperceptible slope, as hard and smooth as 
a floor, the beach proper presents advantages that 
can be found at no other point on the coast. A 
more perfect or delightful drive it would be hard 
to imagine, the unvarying regularity of the tides 
making it traversable fully eighteen hours of the 
twenty-four. An equally enthusiastic reference 
may be made to the beach for bathing purposes. 
The gradual slope renders it perfectly safe, as the 
undertow is thereby made almost unnoticeable. 
Then, too, there is practically an absolute absence 
of seaweed which annoys the bather at most of the 
American beaches. 

Long Beach has a permanent population of 
about 2500. In summer this number is swelled to 
at least 8000. The characteristic cottages and ho- 
tel buildings are here in great numbers. Long, 
shady avenues, pretty kiosks and elaborate pavil- 
ions impart an inviting air of gaiety and comfort. 
Located within easy distance of Los Angeles, it 
is a favorite resort for hundreds who desert the 
close, hot air of the city for a few hours' enjoy- 
ment of the refreshing breezes from the Pacific 
ocean. 

The demands of the pleasure-seeking public 
have been met at all points, one of the greatest 
advantages being the presence of a pier extending 
nearly two thousand feet into the sea and which 
was constructed at a cost of $15,000. It is the 
only pier on the Pacific Coast owned by the people. 
At the end of this wharf is a landing float for 



Los Angeles Terminal Railway 

Of all the lines of transportation which connect 
Los Angeles with the seaside, none can boast of 
reaching a larger and more varied number of 
summer outing places on a single line of road 
than the Los Angeles Terminal Railway. To be- 
gin with the Terminal Railway is an enter- 
prising, energetic company which seeks to build 
up the territory and communities through which 
its trains run. During the entire season thus far 
it has run frequent trains to the seaside from its 
depot just across the river on First street, which 
have also made regular stops at the viaduct of the 
Traction Company which crosses the river a little 
further down on Fourth, both going and coming 
frcm the beaches. These trains are always crowd- 
ed, every seat being taken, sometimes the neces- 
sity arising for putting on many extra coaches, 
which is always done, as the management of the 
road always strives to please its patrons. The 
rifle to the beaches reached by the Terminal rail- 
way, which include Alamitos, Long Beach, Asbury 
Park and Terminal Island, connecting with the 
boat for Catalina Island at the last mentioned 
place, is one continued panorama of unending 
beauty. 

The country traversed is for the most part green 
the year round, being in the artesian water belt, 
from which comes the magnificent water supply 
which is piped to all the resorts above mentioned. 
This water is near the surface and in many places 
where wells have been sunk the water gushes hun- 
dreds of feet in the air. Thus the cause of the 
beautiful green appearance of the verdure clad 
fields is readily understood. 

Upon reaching Long Beach the ride on the line 
of the Terminal railway is directly along the 
ocean front, and upon a very hot day, which luck- 
ily is a very rare occurrence in Southern Califor- 
nia, the breeze which is wafted into the cars as 
the train speeds upon its wav is most delight- 
ful. 

When this breeze fans the cheek, and the eye of 
the tortured Arizonan beholds for the first time 
in a season this magnificent stretch of ocean with 
its huge breakers rolling majestically upon the 
shores of Long Beach, more than one of these 
sorely afflicted mortals has been known to weep 
tears of joy. There is really no view more incom- 
parably grand than the wonderful stretch of ocean 



presented to the eye of the traveler from Alamitos 
to Terminal Island when journeying thither on 
the Terminal's flying trains. 

At any of these beach resorts it is but a mo- 
ment's walk to the water's edge and the bathing 
cannot be excelled anywhere in the world. If one 
enjoys tossing about in huge breakers which come 
with long even sweep upon a gradually sloping 
sandy beach let him leave the train at Long Beach. 
He will find himself longing to come again and 
again. Should he prefer the more quiet waters of 
Terminal Island, where a single wave mildly laps 
the shore, let the traveler continue on to the end 
of his journey and donning his bathing suit float 
for hours on the surface of an ocean which is so 
different in character from that found at any other 
resort that it would hot be difficult to imagine 
oneself transported to another land, were not the 
towns of Long Beach, Alamitos and San Pedro 
plainly visble a few miles distant. 

The Bouton Water Company 

CONSIDERING the quantity and quality of 
the water, there is prooably not a city or 
municipality on the American continent so 
well supplied with water as Long Beach. The 
town and adjacent lands are principally supplied 
by the Bouton Water Company, from its four 
magnificent artesian wells near Bixby station some 
four and a half miles north of Long Beach, these 
wells now flowing approximately 400 inches, equal 
to about 5.000,000 gallons in 24 hours. 

A very large portion of the recent rapid growth 
of the town and great influx of people are at- 
tributable to the superior sanitary properties of 
this exceedingly pure soft water. 

It is well known that people are sojourning at 
Long Beach who have journeyed across the con- 
tinent for the purpose of enjoying the beneficial 
effects of using the water from the Bouton wells 
Professor R. H. Loughridge of the University of 
the State of California remarks of this water: 
The above analysis shows this water to be remark- 
ably pure for all purposes. Its low percentage of 
organic matter and the fact that the residue did 
not blacken on ignition also shows that it is free 
from all contamination and from bacterial germs. 

This water does not coat tea kettles or water 
pipes but cleanses those already coated, effecting 
a saving in fuel as computed by competent en- 
gineers of 20 to 25 per cent in all fuel used. 

The remarkable purity and cleansing qualities of 
this water was clearly illustrated recently when 
the company removed its 12-inch mains that have 
been in use for six years to replace them with 24- 
inch mains; when it was ascertained that the 
inside of the old pipes were as clean, bright and 
free from slime or sediment as the day they were 
laid, this being an incident heretofore entirely un- 
known anywhere. 

THE BOUTON WATER WITHOUT A RIVAL AS 
A REMEDY FOR KIDNEY TROUBLE. 

When the first well was bored on the Bouton 
land near Bixby Station, in the spring of 1891. 
Mr. Walker, a brother of Congressman Walker of 




Massachusetts, the noted bimetallist and statisti- 
cian, residing at Long Beach, who was seriously 
afflicted with kidney trouble, drove out to the well 
and procured a can of water, which he found re- 
lieved him greatly, and continuing to use it he 



Western Graphic 



13 



lived some seven years, and died from other 
causes. He on several occasions expressed the 
opinion that this water was unequaled as a rem- 
edy for kidney trouble. 

H. V. Van Dusen. now residing on Terminal 
Island, states that he was born with, and inherited 
kidney trouble, from Vhich he was unable to ob- 




Bouton Water Company's Well No. 1 being: viewed 
by the members of the International Congress in- 
chiding representatives of foreign countries. Throw- 
ing a solid stream 20 feet above the mouth of a two- 
inch nozzle situated twenty-two feet four inches 
above the surface making a total of forty-four feet 
four inches from the force of the well alone 



tain relief until at the suggestion of Mr. Walker, 
he tried the water from the Bouton wells, with the 
most happy results, as shown by the following 
communication: 



Terminal Island. .Jan. 21. 1899. 
Gen. E. Bouton. Los Angeles. Cal. — 

Pear Sir: Permit me to state that during my 
entire lifetime I have been very seriously afflicted 
with kidney trouble, from which I was unable to 
obtain relief until some five years ago. when I 
commenced using water from the Bouton wells, 
which I have since used constantly, and it has 
afforded me absolute relief, so that I am free of 
all kidney trouble whatever, and I firmly believe 
that the use of that water is a most effective and 
infallible remedy for all kidney trouble. Re- 
spectfully. 

Your Obedient Servant. 

EL S. VAN DUSEN. 
(Fomerly Postmaster, Los Angeles.) 

Attention is also invited to the following letters 
from L. McSwain. mechanical engineer, and J. B. 
Proctor, well borer: 

Compton, Cal.. Feb. 24, 1900. 
Editor Los Angeles Times — 

Dear Sir: Having assisted in boring artesian 
wells on Gen. E. Bouton's land near Bixby Sta- 
tion, and having obtained complete relief from 
kidney trouble of long standing, by using the wa- 
ter from those wells, I desire to convey the in- 
formation to others who may be similarly af- 
flicted, that they may know where they may ob- 
tain the most effectual remedy yet known for kid- 
ney trouble, stone in the bladder or any kindred 
ailment. Yours truly, 

L. McSWAIN. 
Compton. Cal.. March 14, 1900. 

The Thomas Drug Co., Los Angeles, Cal. — 

Gentlemen: I notice that you are offering the 
Bouton water for sale, principally as a kidney 
remedy. 

Permit me to state that when I commenced bor- 
ing the last well for Gen. Bouton. two of my men 
were quite seriously afflicted with kidney trouble, 
from which they were entirely relieved after using 
this water freely for a month or so. One of 
them, who was weak and emaciated, became strong 
and vigorous, gaining some fifteen pounds in 
weight in a little less than two months. 

I also observed that this water is remarkably 
efficient in cleansing and healing sores, cuts, or 
wounds of anv kind. 

J. B. PROCTOR. 

Well Borer. 

A well-known lady of Los Angeles states that 
fully thirty ladies of her acquaintance have ob- 
tained relief by using this water. 

A prominent resident of Pasadena reported ob- 
taining more relief from using the Bouton water 




7\lamitos 
• Beach 





The finest Southern Califorv 
nia Ocean Beach, five miles 
from San Pedro Harbor and 
adjoining the rapidly growv 
ing city of Long Beach on 
the east ; thirtyfivc minutes 
from Los Angeles via Tcr^ 
minal or Southern Pacific 
Railways, The ideal place 
for suburban homes 



Lots 55x150 feet ranging in price 
from $150 to $800 each, 
the latter limited in number 
and unique in their 
splendid Ocean frontage. 
Acreage sold for $150 per acre, 
one-fourth cash balance in 
one, tivo and three years, 
water deeded tuith land. 

Call or Address 



I ALAMITOS LAND CO. I 

Long Beach, Cal. ' 

® GEO. (. FLINT, Secretary * 

•i **) «"•) **) +*) **) *~) *~) *~) *-) *~) *•") *-) «"*) *~) *-) *-) 



Are Time and Comfort 




any object to you ? | 



IF they are, you will be interested in knowing that the Southern Pacific- Com- 
*■ pany has this season vastly improved their service between Long Beach 
and all points. 

Between Interior Points and Long Beach 

this is the only Company having through trains, through baggage cheeks and 
Union Station in Los Angeles. 

Between Los Angeles and Long Beach 

there are fourteen regular daily passenger trains with faster service than any other line. 
Five centrally located Los Angeles stations (River Station, Naud Junction, Commercial 
Street, First Street and Arcade Depot) make this line the most convenient for residents in every p rtion of 
the city. All car lines connect. 

Ten Ride Tickets, good for anyone, $1.50 

Between Los Angeles and Long Beach 

Trains leave Arcade Depot (subject to change without notice) at 9.05 a. m., 10.00 a. m., 1.40 p. m., 
5.03 p.m., 6.15 p. m. (except Sunday), 8.05 p. m. (except Saturday), 11.45 P- m - (Saturday only). 

EXTRA SUNDAY TRAINS 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY = 261 South Spring Street 



14 



Western Graphic 





LONO i;EA('H DEVELOPMENT COMPANY'S WATER WORKS PLANT 



one week than using Waukeshaw water for live 

years. 

Many other similar instances might be enum- 
erated, all tending to show that for all kidney 
trouble and kindred ailments, this water is surely 
superior to anything yet known. More than a 
hundred cases of relief have been reported and 
not a single failure. 

The cleansing and healing properties of this 
water have been most noteworthy, as shown by 
the following statement from the well known 
Beck Brothers: 

Los Angeles, Nov. 15th, 1894. 

Gen. E. Bouton — 

Dear Sir: We desire to call your attention to 
the remarkable healing qualities of the water 
from the well we have just bored for you at Bix- 
by Station. 

When we commenced work on that well, our 
men had numerous cuts, bruises and sores on thei. - 
ha'.iils, incident to their vocation, but when they 
commenced working in that water it cleansed and 
healed their injuries in an incredibly short time. 

Yours Truly, 

BECK BROTHERS, 
Well Borers. 

This is a remarkably pure, soft water, and has 
proved to be very efficient in dissolving and clear- 
ing the liver and kidneys of any impurities, there- 
by stimulating their action and removing the 
cause of a numerous family of the ills that human 
flesh is neir to. The fact seems well established 
that the free use of this water will so accelerate 
the action of the kidneys as to prevent the 
effusion of uric acid into the blood, thereby re- 
moving the cause and effecting a cure of rheuma- 
tism, dropsy, torpid liver, impure blood and vari- 
ous other contingent ailments. 

The Bouton wells are undoubtedly located on 
the greatest known body or strata of artesian wa- 
ter of which there is any known record, the last 
well boied showed by the log or record of the 
well-borers 467 feet of water-bearing gravel and 
sand in a total depth of 767 feet. 

One stream, 210 feet in depth, of which 150 feet 
is gravel without a break, has been ascertained 
after diligent inquiry from all known sources of 
information, including the Department of Geolog- 
ical Survey at Washington to constitute the great- 
est underground stream of artesian w/ater yet 
discovered in the entire world. 

Engineers, well-borers and expsrts have esti- 
mated that 50,000 or more inches of water can be 
developed at this point. 

Big Water Basin 

ANALYSIS, APRIL 25. 1900. 

Grains Parts 

per Gal. per 10,000 

Calcium Carbonate 1.20 .21 

Magnesium Carbonate 1.30 .23 

Sodium Carbonate 6.30 1.08 

Sodium Chloride 2.10 .36 

Potasium Sulph. Silica 60 .10 

Total mineral matter 11.50 1.98 

THE Koran declares "There is but one God 
and Mohammed is His Prophet." There is 
but one Long Beach, and prominently one 
of its crowning glories is its splendid water system, 
the Development Company's .new system being 
especially the one of which this article treats. 
Long Beach has reason to be proud of the late im- 
provements made by the Development Company 
which has recently remodeled its entire system 
after the best modern practice, greatly increasing 
its capacity in every particular. 

The wells, power-house and reservoir are located 
two and a half miles directly north of Long 
Beach, on the dividing line between this city and 
Los Angeles, along the route of the Los Angeles 
Terminal railway. 



The power-house just recently finished is 35x40 
in dimensions, constructed of brick and the ap- 
paratus embraces the product of the most ad- 
vanced and progressive manufacturers. The 8-inch 
well is near by that reaches a depth of 718 feet. 
Two powerful Worthington pumps with a capacity 
of throwing 630 gallons a minute each, are used in 
delivering the supply to the reservoir. From the 
well to the reservoir the distance is ■ 3,300 feet, 
connected by a 12-inch pipe, the water being raised 
to an elevation of 90 feet at its discharge in the 
reservoir. It gives the Graphic pleasure to pro- 
duce a photo-engraving of this splendid building 
and its mechanical appliances. The reservoir is 
said to be the finest in the State, and no amount 
of talk could make us think otherwise. It occu- 
pies a high prominence, with a diameter of 120 
feet, excavated at a depth of 15 feet and cemented 
from top to bottom. A tight, self-supporting roof 
covers the entire basin, being raised two feet 
above the cement, with a fine screen wire thrown 
around the entire enclosure, excluding the possi- 
bility of animals, birds, bats, bugs or any con- 
taminating influences coming in contact therewith. 
In a second place a pure current of air is always 
circulating over the water, purifying and allow- 
ing the obnoxious gases to escape. At the bot- 
tom of the reservoir, the drainage has been care- 
fully arranged. Once a month the reservoir is 



3 inch nozzle over the tallest building in Long 

Beach. 

The company have also furnished a nice 5-room 
cottage for the engineer and his family near the 
works, where that gentleman is ever in attend- 
ance upon his machinery and the entire works at 
that end of the line. 

d& 

The New First National Bank 

It is estimated by those in a position to know 
that the city of Long Beach has well nigh trebled 
in population within the past eighteen months. 
In keeping with the growth of the residence sec- 
tion has been that of the business portion, and no 
feature of this latter could possibly be consid- 
ered more essential than the banking interests. 
Realizing that business existed for a national 
bank a number of gentlemen, among whom are 
Mr. J. B. Heartwell and his son Mr. C. L Heart- 
well, interested themselves in founding the First 
National Bank of Long Beach which has but just 
opened its doors for business and is situated at 
the corner of Pine and First streets in Long Beach. 
The date of the organization was June 26, 1900, 
and the stock is largely held by Long Beach 
people. The officials and directorate of the bank 
comprise the following gentlemen: .1. M. Elliott, 
president First National Bank of Los Angeles. 




THE NEW FIRST NATIONAL BANK 



discharged of its waters and the entire walls and 
all sediment accumulations cleansed and reno- 
vated. While this procedure goes on, the reserve 
reservoir immediately adjoining is held for sup- 
ply. 

The machinery is all in duplicate form and in 
case of displacement to one set the other is 
brought into use. 

The company has been at an outlay of some 
180,000, in order to provide the people of Long 
Beach with this matchless system of water. Be- 
sides its great domestic utility, irrigating pur- 
poses and otherwise, they have looked well to our 
fire protection. The elevation of the great reser- 
voir is of sufficient gravity to throw water from a 



president; J. B. Heartwell, vice-president; C. L. 
Heartwell, cashier; W. P. L. Stafford, attorney, 
W. W. Lowe, C. J. Walker, president Long Beach 
Board of Trustees, and W. L. Campbell. 

At a very considerable expense the commodious 
banking room has been equipped with the finest 
fixtures, desks and all the essentials to a neat 
banking room. There is a new double vault, one 
for its banking department and one especially con- 
structed for its safe deposit boxes. The vaults are 
equipped with Diebold burglar proof chests and 
automatic triple time locks. The safe deposit 
boxes are made of chrome steel of the latest de- 
sign. The engraving of the interior of the new 
bank which appears in this issue is made from the 



Western Graphic 



15 



first photograph taken after 
had been placed in position. 

The Oldest Bank of Long Beach 

As the trains on the Los Angeles Terminal rail- 
way approach the station at Long Beach, if one 
is seated on the side of the car facing toward the 
town, almost the first sight which greets his eye 
and particularly fastens his attention is the large 
business block in which is situated the Bank of 
Long Beach. This is one of the substantial busi- 
ness institutions of the town, was organized in 
1?96 and is located at the junction of the two 
piincipal streets of the place. Pine and Ocean ave- 
nue. The building in which the bank is situated is 
a three-story structure, and the remainder of the 
ground floor rooms are occupied by stores, the 
upper floors by offices. The list of the officials 
and directors of the institution is a tower of 
strength composing names whom it will be ob- 
served are among the wealthiest and most suc- 
cessful business men doing business in this sec- 
tion of the Pacific Coast. They are Jothan Bixby, 
president; D. S. Shaw, vice-president; P. E. Hatch, 
cashier; H. W. Hellman, T. L. Duque, Geo. H. Bix- 
by, Frederick H. Rindge, C. F. A. Johnson, Fred H. 
Bixby, J. W. Wood, Frank McCutcheon. A num- 
ber of these gentlemen will be recognized by read- 
ers^ fthis item as prominent bankers of Los An- 



the bank furniture <p§S*E5B^C5i^E5^K^£^!3^^ 




HANK ( ) F LONG BKACH 

geles. The paid-up capital stock of the bank is 
?25,000, with a surplus fund of $3500. Mr. Jothan 
Bixby, the president, is one of the old-time Cali- 
fornians and is one of the largest land owners in 
Southern California. He is vice-president of the 
Alamitos Land Companq, a 4000-acre tract adjoin- 
ing Long Beach, President of the Bixby Land 
Company, a large tract surrounding the sugar fac- 
tory at Los Alamitos, and president of the Loma 
Vista Ranch Company, a large property between 
Los Angeles and Redondo. 

The Bank of Long Beach was organized by its 
cashier, Mr. P. E. Hatch, after he had been in 
Long Beach about eighteen months. His experi- 
ence as a bank cashier for seven and a half years 
in the East had shown to his experienced mind 
the need of a bank at Long Beach. The institu- 
tion has been doing a flourishing business ever 
since its organization and is regarded as one of 
the strongest in Southern California. 

t$ 

Dr. L. A. Perce, comparatively a new-comer to 
Long Beach, is fast becoming one of its most pop- 
ular citizens. Dr. Peice is a native of Spring- 
field, Illinois, his father having been an old settler 
there. He received his early education in the Ec- 
lectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, and 
afterward graduated from the National College of 
Electro Therapeutics of Lima, Ohio. With twen- 
ty- three years of active practice behind him, Dr. 
Perce came to Long Beach two years ago and as- 
sociated himself with Dr. O. C. Wellbourn, and is 
now doing a general practice. He has always 
been prominent in fraternal orders, belonging to 
eleven, and being medical examiner for several 
of them. While in Ohio he held several official 
positions in the Jr. O. U. A. M., Knights of Pythias, 
Woodmen of the World and the K. O. T. M. He 
served as State Councilor of Ohio for the Jr. O. 
U. A. M. and was presented with an elegant gold 
medal upon the expiration of his term. He has 
lately been made president of the Republican Club 
of Long Beach. Dr. Perce has a keepsake in the 
shape of a dagger-cane, which he prizes very 




RESIDENCE OF C. J. WALKER 

manager of c. j. walker & company 
Real Estate, Loans 
and Insurance . . . 

Place of business, corner Pine and Second streets 
Telephone 63 Long Beach, California 



highly; it was given to his father by Abraham 
Lincoln, with whom he wai connected in public 
life in the early days. Dr Perce has a beautiful 
office and reception room over the Long Beach 
bank, thoroughly fitted with X ray and other elec- 




trical apparatus. Long Beach is ever ready to 
welcome citizens of Dr. Perce's calibre, knowing 
that they have the interests of the community at 
heart. 

Dr. J. M. Holden, who has his reception room 
with Dr. Wood, is a native of Providence, R. I., 
and came to California some nine years ago, lo- 
cating in Pasadena, 
which he made his 
" home for eight 
years. A year ago he 
decided to make 
Long Beach his 
home and his con- 
fidence in the city 
was not misplaced, 
as is shown by the 
splendid practice he 
has built up. Dr. 
Holden is medical 
examiner for the 
Woodmen of the 
World, Fraternal 
Brotherhood and the 
Modern Woodmen of 
the World. He Is a 
member of the Or- 
der of Maccabees, 
is also alternate examiner for the New York 




lie 



Life Insurance Company, which position is made 
by appointment. He is a member of the Los An- 
geles County Medical Association. Dr. Holden is 
comparatively a young man and is said to be a 
great student, spending most of his spare time In 
reading. 

The city government of Long Beach comes fn 
for a little mention in this edition, and on one 
page a large engraving of a number of the officials 
is presented. 

C. J. Walker, president of the Board of Trustees, 
while but a young man, is a director of the First 
National Bank, recently organized, is at the head 
of an ever increasing real estate, loan and rental 
business, is prominent in religious and social or- 
ders of Long Beach and expects to make this 
place his permanent home. He has resided there 



for six years, coming from Tulare county, where 
he was engaged in the same business, and occu- 
pied a position as a county official for some time. 

R. G. Ravenscroft, another one of the trustees, 
is the owner of some landed interests in Orange 
county, Long Beach and elsewhere, having been 
for some time engaged in the hotel business in 
Long Beach, being owner of the Bellevue Lodge. 

T. A. Stephens, the third trustee whose portrait 
appears in the group, is associated with one of the 
important lumber companies of Long Beach, and 
has been a resident of this atractive resort for 
five years past. 

S. G. Long, the city attorney of Long Beach, 
is one of the firm of Long & Baker of Los An- 
geles, with offices 216-217 Bullard Block, and has 
resided there for four years, moving from Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. He is a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Virginia. 

Chas. L. Hartwell, the present City Treasurer, 
organizer and cashier of the First National Bank 
of Long Beach, has resided there for about four 
years, and was at one time acting City Treasurer 
in the absence of Treasurer Geo. Flint. 

Wm. B. Julien, the City Clerk, has made Long 
Beach his home for over five years, being engaged 
with his father in the hotel business for a number 
of years. He makes a very efficient and popular 
city official. 

.1. C. Baker, who, in a very impartial manner, 
performs the duties of City Marshal, is now in the 
enjoyment of his second term of office. He is very 
vigilant in his pursuit of offenders against the 
peace and well being of Long Beach. 

.1. A. Teele, the street contractor and grader, is 
an old resident of Long Beach and the owner of 
considerable property there. He has served accept- 
ably one other term in the same office. 

,< .< 

A man who has been prominent in the public af- 
fairs of Long Beach is Dr. J. W. Wood. Dr. Wood 
came to Long Beach in 1887 and since that time 

has been untiring in 

_ his efforts to make 

Long Beach what It 
is today. New York 
claims him as jier 
son and he received 
his early education 
In the High school 
at Geneva, later 
graduating from the 
Qonandaigua Acade- 
my. He took the de- 
gree of M. D. at the 
College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons 
of Chicago in 1883. 
He has held several 
public offices in 
Long Beach, having 
been health officer 
for several years un- 
til he was elected Councilmen. He has served six 
years as a member of the School Board. During 
his last term Dr. Wood was very anxious to re- 
sign, but was prevailed upon to serve out his term, 
at the expiration of which he was unanimously re- 
elected. He is surgeon for the Long Beach divis- 
ion of the Terminal railway and local surgeon for 
the Southern Pacific. Dr. Wood has lately been 
made president of the Cuckawalla Mining Com- 
pany of Riverside county. 

i$ 

The prodigal son went wrong, but he came back 
all right. 



16 



Western Graphic 




Where Cool Breezes Blow 

News a^nd Gossip from the R^esorts 



COOl and 

Pleasant 
Always 



AT 



HOTEL REDONDO 

JOS. H. BOHON, Manager 

"fanned by Ocean Breezes" 




terminal 
Tsland 

Cong 
Beach 

Catalina 
Tsland 



No better places for Ska Bathing, Fisiiinu 
Yachting and Boating on the Pacific 
Coast. Fine hotels, good boarding' houses, 
Elegant camp grounds and pure water. 
Agents of the 

Los Angeles Terminal Railway 

Will .sell yon tickets and furnish all desired 
information. 

Excursion Rates Frequent Trains 

City Ticket Office. 837 So. Spring St., Los Angeles 
t. K . Kile, (Jen. Mgr. T. U Peck, lieu. Pass Aet. 

I pREE CAMP GROUND 

* With Pure Mountain Water $ 

— at Avalon 

Santa Catalina 
Island 

Under conditions prevailing last year. Dozens 
of swift power launches for fishing and excur- 
sions. Tuna Club tournament now on. Free 
concerts by our famous band of 20 soloists. 
The best golf links. The aquarium, containing 
hundreds of living wonders of the deep. Boat- 
ing and bathing over Nature's most wonderful 
marine gardens, as seen at great depth through 
smooth transparent waters, with the many 
other natural advantages, permits Catalina to 
offer attractions for season of 1900 not possible 
at other resorts. Daily steamer service, Her- 
mosa running Saturdays and Sundays. Hotel 
Metropole always open. Take Southern Pa- 
cific cr Terminal Ry. trains, leaving L. A. 
daily at 9:05 and 8:50 a. m., respectively. Fare 
round trip from Los Angeles, excursion $2.50; 
regular $2.75. 



BANNING CO. 



222 S. Spring St. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Telephone Main 36 



Hammam Turkish 

Russian or 5Qc 

210 South Broadway 
Los Angeles.... 



Tel. Green 427 



Open Day 
and Night 



SANTA MONICA— Who says Santa Monica 
isn't in it this summer? Everyone pre- 
saged that the liquor ordinance would be a 
drop too much, but — it has only been a drop in 
the bucket. Of course, there are those who will 
say that a great many persons have gone — where 
there is no liquor ordinance this summer. How- 
ever theat may be, a resort usually measures its 
success or failure from the standpoint whether 
society has come or not. And while society was 
very slow in its move toward any beach this year, 
and consequently to Santa Monica, yet at the 
present writing it has appeared. Some prominent 
people may have been deterred from making the 
Arcadia Hotel its headquarters for the summer 
on account of the absence of a sideboard, etc., yet 
a large contingent of the best and most desirable 
society of Los Angeles — and San Francisco — is in 
force. August seems to have taken the town. The 
erstwhile deserted streets have taken a new activ- 
ity, the beach is thronged, bathers are without 
number, and the onlookers, with their gay para- 
phernalia of umbrellas, chairs and cushions, are 
dispersed about the sands in all the glory of the 
Old Santa Monica of other years. 

The past seven days have completely changed 
the panorama: important arrivals are noted daily 
at the Arcadia Hotel, and the coming ten days 
will hardly hold the crowds. It seemed in the 
early summer that society had given its old-time 
favored hostelry the go-by, but an uninterrupted 
system of perfect management without other her- 
aldry than excellent service, an unimpeachable 
cuisine, and the result that comes with a personal 
oversight in every detail, have won, and the peo- 
ple have come. They were slow, but they are 
here. 

The new activity about the Arcadia has given 
an impetus to the social gaieties in the town, and 
teas and entertainments have fairly started in. 
On Sunday Mrs. Roy Jones gave a tea at her home 
on Ocean avenue for a few Los Angeles friends to 
meet Mrs. H. B. Goodwin of San Francisco, who is 
spending six weeks at Miramar. 

On Tuesday night there was the Casino dance, 
given under the auspices of the Santa Monica Golf 
Club, and in reality the formal opening of the Ca- 
sino. It was a small dance, but perfectly select 
and beautifully managed. The Klaus orchestra 
furnished the music, and a delicious supper was 
served. While the Casino ball room was quite 
comfortably filled with its array of guests, yet it 
was a question to different ones whether the space 
would be adequate for the accommodation of the 
crowd expected for the tennis dance. It is true 
that the punch and chaperones might be relegated 
to the verandahs, yet minus that area would the 
Casino be the most desirable place for the 
dance. Last summer it was held in the Arcadia 
ball room and it is a matter of contemplation 
whether the same quarters would not have the 
advantage this year. 

Among the other entertainments this week were 
the musicale and children's party given by Mrs. 
Modini-Wood and a juvenile affair at the home of 
Mrs. J. G. Scarborough. The musicale was ten- 
dered as a benefit for St. Paul's church in Los An- 
geles and was a great success and most enjoyable 
evening. 

With the outside gaieties, the Arcadia Hotel has 
had several little swell functions of its own; teas, 
dinners, dances, &c, &c. A small tea was given 
in the bower of the hotel on Wednesday afternoon 
by Mrs. Randolph Miner. On Tuesday evening a 
dinner party was given by Mrs. John E. Plater in 
the grill room, the grill having quite a fashionable 
run of its own this season. The dinner was in 
compliment to Miss Queen of Kentucky, a sister 
of Mrs. Nat Wilshire's, who is visiting her and 
withal a charming young woman. Previous to the 
dinner the whole party enjoyed the sophistry of 
a palmist, who assured the various members they 
"would be successful in their undertakings," in 
which it was agreed that the first "undertaking" 
of their experience was a perfect success. The din- 
ner was a most enjoyable affair. 

On Wednesday evening there was a children's 
dance at the Arcadia from 8 to 9, which met with 
the only drawback, at that late hour, of finding 
most of its "prominent guests" tucked away for 
the night. The larger children, which are the mi- 
nority, however, at the hotel, did some small ex- 
hibitions of cakewalks and two steps and "were 
enjoyed" by a great line of spectators, to whom a 
flock of wee folks in their fairy-like frills are al- 
ways a pretty sight. 

The dance which is to take place at the Arcadia 
tonight will, it is expected, have a large attend- 
ance from the fact that the hotel guests have spe- 
cially invited a number of their friends both in 
Los Angeles and Santa Monica. 

A notable arrival at the Arcadia Hotel the past 
week was that of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac L. Requa of 
San Francisco and the young children of Mr. 
Mark Requa, who came in their private car with 
a retinue of attendants. Colonel and Mrs. O. F. 
Long (nee Requa) spent a most enjoyable period 



here last month and hope to come again for a 
short time before the season is over. 

Among prominent Angelenos who have swelled 
the clientele of the hotel the past seven days have 
been: Mr. and Mrs. John T. Griffith, child and 
maid: Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Busch, two children and 
maid: Mr. and Mrs. J. W. A. Off and Mrs Georgia 
Off, Major and Mrs. John H. Norton, Miss Amy 
Marie Norton and maid, Mrs. John E. Plater, 
Miss Waddilove, Dr.' and Mrs. Henderson Hay- 
ward, child and nurse; Mr. Stanley Hayward, Mr. 
and Mrs. Guthrie, Miss Flora Guthrie, Mr. and 
Mrs. Samuel Storrow, child and maid; Messrs. Will 
Wolters, Ned Field, Robert Rowan, Dickinson, Bu- 
ruiller, F. J. Cosby. 

During tennis week teas will be given by Mrs. 
Ed. Tufts, Mrs. Roy Jones, Mrs. Abbot Kinney. 

All the young people are coming to Santa Mon- 
ica from Redondo for the tournament and an en- 
joyable ten days is in store. Today, which ushers 
in the gaieties with a golf tournament, will begin 
the social calendar with a tea to be given this af- 
ternoon by Mrs. Beatty and the Misses Jean and 
Josephine Beatty. 

The ladies' event in the Santa Monica tennis 
tournament will be more popular this year than 
ever. For the first time there will be a number 
of entries not strictly from Southern California. 
Miss Ruby Garland of Nordhoff, who has played 
such a good game at some of the Ojai tournaments, 
has sent in her entry for the singles and she and 
Mrs. G. A. White of Santa Barbara will play to- 
gether in the doubles. They will introduce an 
element of uncertainty in the finals which always 
means excitement and good sport. Then, too, 
little Miss May Sutton managed to win from the 
champion, Miss Violet Sutton, at the recent Re- 
dondo tournament and there are plenty of her ad- 
mirers who think she will be able to take the 
championship at Santa Monica. A number of the 
other lady players have been putting up a good 
game and there will be a number of good matches 
straight through. Miss Carter, who formerly held 
the title so often, is back in Santa Monica, and is 
sure to play in mixed doubles with one of her 
brothers, and may also play in ladies' doubles. 
Miss Carter plays a strong, aggresive game and 
if she can be induced to enter in the singles, will 
be able even without much practice to make any 
of our lady players do their utmost to take a 
match from her. 

Ladies' doubles will be played this season the 
first time in a number of years. There was a 
period when the girls seemed to lose all interest in 
the game and it was difficult to get enough en- 
tries to make the events fill. Now all that is 
changed and this branch of the sport, always most 
popular with the grand stand, will be hotly con- 
tested by a large number of players. 

There will also be some new blood among the 
men. Professor Barker of New Mexico, who is 
the champion in the section from which he 
comes, is now staying in Santa Monica and prac- 
tising every day with a view to entering. Brit- 
ton has shown tremendous improvement since last 
year and may be able to upset the calculations of 
some of the other players. Alphonzo Bell is still 
regarded as the best single player in Southern Cal- 
ifornia, but if Lewis Freeman can get back from 
Seattle in time to play there will be a final worth 
coming a long way to see. The absence of Braly 
and Hendrick breaks up two of the strongest 
double teams and leaves the field open to a new 
combination. Sumner Hardy was interested in 
pretty nearly every championship last year and as 
he is in the east we can look for a lot of new 
cup winners. Frank Carter, the Professor and 
brother of the redoubtable "Bob," has a little trick 
of winning himself and he will be here to show 
the boys what a veteran can do. 

AVALON — It would be a most difficult under- 
taking to find a more brilliant assemblage 
than graced the Saturday night hop at Ho- 
tel Metropole. The hotel was filled with fashion- 
able people and many society favorites of both 
sexes came over on the late boat specially for the 
occasion. 

It's a constant round of pleasure at Avalon these 
days. The top notch of popularity at this resort 
is the month of August and the largest crowds of 
the season are now in evidence. A stroll through 
the streets gives one the impression that the towns 
across the channel must be almost depopulated, 
for one finds nearly all one's friends in the throne 
here. How do they pass the time away? Fishing 
claims many; bathing claims many more; seeing 
the boats in claims still more, and the free open 
air concert by the Catalina Island Band and the 
dancing at the pavilion a little later claims them 
all. 

No one has time to die of ennui when Mrs. How- 
ard M. Sale is about. She is endowed in the high- 
est degree with the faculty of designing entertain- 
ment for her friends. During the first half of the 
week she had engineered a launch party and pic- 
nic to the Isthmus; a "tacky" party at Hotel 



Western Graphic 



17 



Metropole and a candy pull at the golf club house, 
which does pretty well for one-half week. The 
"tacky" party was specially a great success. 
About thirty-five couples, dressed without regard, 
participated in the grand march, led by Mrs. Sale 
and Col. Dan Burns. The Colonel took as his 
model Will E. Chapin's caricature of him and ar- 
rayed in check overalls, blue flannel shirt and 
sombrero he required no label, for he appeared to 
have just stepped out of the Daily Times' picture 
album to grace the occasion. Dancing was then 
indulged in, only those in costume being allowed 
on the floor. The judges were Judge B. N. Smith, 
James W. Long and Mr. Hamburg. They awarded 
first prizes for best costume to Miss Evangelyn 
Cope and J. W. Anderson. 

The boys from the Whittier State School are 
now encamped at Camp Banning, a little nook on 
the island about three miles west of Avalon. 
They, with their officers, number 250 persons and 
will remain in camp for three weeks. Afterward 
the girls will be given an outing of two weeks 
at the same place. They are brought over from 
San Pedro on a special boat. 

The golf links and tennis courts present a very 
animated appearance these days, as there are more 
than one hundred players at these games who en- 
gage in the diversion daily. Each Saturday local 
tournaments are arranged and much interest is 
manifest. In last Saturday's golf contest R. H. 
Ripley carried off the honors in the gentlemen's 
event by a net score of 94 with a handicap of 22. 
In the ladies' event Mrs. C. M. Moore won with a 
net score of 47, her handicap being 14. Mrs. F. 
O. Johnson was second with a score of 49 and a 
handicap of 16. 

ti5^ 

REDONDO BEACH— The festive air of Hotel 
Redondo reached a climax Wednesday 
evening in a grand vaudeville entertain- 
ment and freak show. The actors, the freaks, the 
audience and everything were at their best and the 
occasion was declared one of the liveliest ever en- 
joyed at this pleasant hostelry. The variety pro- 
gram included some very brilliant turns by very 
clever people, and the freaks and side shows were 
so close a counterfeit of the classic originals that 
a real circus could not have furnished more fun. 
There were cakewalks, song and dance artists, 
musical specialties, knockabout comedians, ballet 
dancers, Adgie and her lions and many other fea- 
tures too numerous to mention. Everything went 
with a dash and the affair was altogether one of 
the jolliest of the season. 

The cotillion given at the hotel last Saturday 
evening was one of the prettiest affairs ever at- 
tempted by the management of the hotel and was 
thoroughly enjoyed by the guests. The ball room 
was beautifully decorated with date palms and 
other greens, with these as a background for the 
handsome gowns that were worn the scene pre- 
sented was a brilliant one. Much of the success 
of the evening was due to the ability with which 
Captain J. J. Meyler, U. S. A., led the different 
figures. Among those who danced were Capt. and 
Mrs. J. J. Meyler, Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Ainsworth. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Young, Mr. T. A. Warren and 
Mrs. Hardenburgh, Mr. Sam Haskins and Miss 
Eliza Bonsall, Mr. Daggett and Miss Louise Mc- 
Farland, Mr. Ben Mansfield and Miss Bessie Bon- 
sall, Mr. Dan McFarland and Miss May Ridgeway, 
Mr. Guy Corson and Miss May Corson. Miss Edith 
Herron and Mr. James Hobbs, Mr. Earl Pursell 
and Miss Grace McCormick, Mr. Douglas Burnett 
and Miss Nellie Clark, Mr. Peters and Miss Inez 
Clark, Mr. Page and Miss Seymour, Mr. J. G. 
Easton and Mrs. L. T. Garnsey, Mr. Vermillion 
and Miss Ethel Mullins, Mr. Robert Rowan and 
Miss Cirnenter, Mr. Irwin Herron and Miss Bur- 
ton, Mr. Herbert Anderson and Miss Susie Carpen- 
ter. 

The luncheon given Tuesday by Mrs. C. C. Car- 
penter at her home was a most enjoyable and 
unique entertainment. The decorations were car- 
ried out in Chinese effects. The place cards were 
dainty Oriental sketches, and a number of beauti- 
ful Chinese pieces were noticeable in the table 
service. The hostess extended her hospitality to 
Mmes. H. B. Ainsworth, W. G. Young, Cunning- 
ham, Richard Blaisdell, Margaret Hobbs. John 
Corson, T. A. Lewis, M. L. Sargent, Jack Wells. P. 
H. Seymour, Dan McFarland, Friesner, Wm. Prid- 
ham, R. H. Herron, E. F. C. Klokke. Godfrev Hol- 
terhoff, Graham, Wesley Clark, W. M. Van Dyke, 
Misses Clemmons, Ruth Adams, Carpenter and Su- 
sie Carpenter. 

A "kickers" golf tournament is down on the 
program for amusements next week. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Allen visited friends at the 
hotel last Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Nevin, who have been stay- 
ing at the hotel for a number of weeks, have 
retimed to their home in Los Angeles. 

Miss Alby Easton came down Wednesday to at- 
tend the "Freak" show at the hotel. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Phipps and Mr. C. J. G. 
Easton were guests at the hotel during the week. 

Mrs. George Denis took luncheon with Mrs. 
Wesley Clark at the hotel Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. F. C. Klokke have taken up 
their abode at Hotel Redondo for the remaining 
summer months. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Kerckhoff are located at the 
hotel. 



BOY" is purpoi 
and most ii 



Lieut. S. L. Graham. U. S. N., and Mrs. Graham 
have apartments at the hotel for the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Sherman and family, well- 
known Pasadena people, have come to the hotel 
for a stay of a number of weeks. 

Miss Ruth Adams is the guest of Miss Clara 
Carpenter at her pretty Redondo home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Rogers and children are en- 
joying the cool breezes of Redondo. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Hill and son are pleasantly 
located at the hotel. 

One of the particular events of the week was 
the annual at the hotel of little Miss Bohon. Mr. 
and Mrs. Bohon are receiving hearty congratula- 
tions from their many friends. 

The usual Saturday night dance will take place 
at the hotel this evening. 

Mrs. Olin Wellborn. Miss Lillian Wellborn and 
Mrs. Stratton of Dallas, Texas, formed a pleasant 
party at luncheon at the hotel Tuesday. 

Literary Gossip 

Conducted by^^^Garner Curra.n 

' k 1 N -"rported to be one of the longest 

important noveels of Marie 
Corelli since the publication of "The Sor- 
rows of Satan," and it is a rather interesting his- 
tory of an English youth from the time he wore 
pinafores to his death from a Boer's bullet during 
the late unpleasantness in South Africa. There 
can be little said of the story other than it holds 
the reader's attention fairly well, although there is 
little plot and not much character delineation. 
Miss Corelli portrays a most delightful old maid, 
who falls in love with Boy when he sat in his 
high chair eating bread and milk, and whose af- 
fection never fails him. There is a rather strong 
suggestion of Thackeray's Amelia in this sweet 
woman, who devotes her life to the memory of a 
lover who died, and there is also the prototype of 
Major Dobbin in the old soldier, Major Desmond, 
who loves Miss Letty, and who knows that her 
fiance, whom she so devoutly loved and so thor- 
oughly believed in, to be a rascal, and had before 
his death declared his intention of deserting her 
for another. All this, however, Major Desmond 
would not tell, and as this author does not give us 
a Becky Sharp who would not hesitate to bring 
out the real facts, Miss Letty goes to her grave 
without knowing the truth, and Major Desmond's 
love is never rewarded. The story is wholesome 
enough, but certainly neither original or clever. 

For easy chuckling humor with a comfortable 
long-shore whiff of it, "A Master of Craft," by W. 
W. Jacobs, may be heartily recommended. That 
cheerful reprobate. Captain Fred Flower, offers 
marriage to three women at once. His devices for 
releasing himself from his pressing engagements 
and the misadventures which ensue to him and to 
others are amusing indeed, the more so as most 
of the women concerned are grim strategists with 
no more scruples than Bismarck, veritable old 
campaigners, stolidly determined on matrimony 
as a certain brand of lower-class English woman 
appears to be, according to her compatriots. This 
prevents any strain on the reader's sensibilities, 
and leaves him free to enjoy the rough and ready 
comedy wherein these amazons and the crew of 
the Foam perform delectable anttcs. Anything 
funnier than those ancient mariners, Joe and 
Dick, the cook, the cabin boy; and Willyum Green, 
the new hand, has hardly been done. It is rough 
fun, but wholesome as oatcake or English ale, 
and will be welcome to palates weary of subtle, 
cynical, fin-de-siecle witticisms. — (F. A. Stokes.) 

Stephen Bonsai, whose information on the sub- 
ject has been obtained at first hand, writes in 
the August Review of Reviews on "The Chinese 
Revolution." His article is a clear and exhaustive 
account of the various reform movements in 
China, and especially of the rise and growth of 
the Boxers, together with a review of the complex 
and eventful career of the Empress-Dowager. 

*t . *C 

The midsummer holiday issue of the Century 
Magazine is chiefly notable, perhaps, as introduc- 
ing a writer hitherto unknown. Bertha Runklc. 
a young woman, still in her early twenties. The 
story, which will run for several months, is called 
"The Helmet of Navarre." 

< < jl 

The August number of The Ladies' Home Jour- 
nal is. according to the midsummer custom, de- 
voted largely to high grade fiction. Among the 
articles of special interest is "College Girls' Larks 
and Pranks — retold by a graduate." 

.< & J* 

The August, Fiction Number, of Scribner's 
Magazine is always a notable one, both for its 
short stories and the unusual number of illustra- 
tions. This year it will be found especially rich 
in these particulars as well as in other features. 

^ < vt 

[. J. Frazee of Moosa, San Diego county, the 
author of "Nahda," is dramatizing his novel at 
the suggestion of Eastern parties. 



SANTA MONICA RESORTS 



f)otel Hrcadia 

Santa JVIomca 
by the sea 

finest Summer Rcaort on the pacific 

Elegant Hotel Elevator 
Electric Lights Orchestra 

SERVICE, TABLE, AND APPOINTMENTS 
UNEXCELLED 

Delightful, cool breezes from the ocean on 

warmest days. 
An ideal Summer Resort for those who wish 

to escape the heat of interior towns. 
The cleanest, smoothest and safest beach in the 

world. 

Surf bathing, boating, fishing, beautiful drives. 
Reached by S. P. R. R. trains and electric cars 

every half hour. Time from Los Angeles 

55 minutes. 
For rates and further information address 

W. E. ZANDER, Mgr. 



Santa Monica 

will be more attractive this summer than 
before. There are No Saloons a New Club 
House for golf and tennis, a salt water 
Plunge filled daily and kept warm and 

many other things which ought to make it 
the best summer resort this coming season. 
Address a letter to the North Beach Batli 
House Co. and we shall be glad to furnish 
you with all sorts of information about hotel 
rates, cottages, bathing, athletics or any- 
thing else you many desire to know. Let 
us help you locate this year. 



DAVIS M. CLARK 

REAL ESTATE, RENTAL AGENT 
I have a fine list of Cottages and Building Lots for sale 
or rent. The finest Beach on the Coast. 

iioj S. Second St., Oceanpark, 
At terminus of electric car lin L. A. C».. Cal. 




Nothing elne adds no much 
to the charm of the drawing 
room or boudoir ms the softly radi- 
ant hunt from CORDOVA Candle*. 

Nothing will contribute mora to the 
artistic success of the luncheon, 
tea or dinner. The befit decorative 
candles for the simplest or tho 
most elahorato fiinet ion— for cot- 
tage or mansion. Made in all colors 
and t he most delicate tints by 
: IIMH RD oi I. CO. 
and sold cverywhoro. 



i 

9% 



• « * « Che Paper in this Publication is 
"Balf tone Book ," furnished by • « « « 

Blake, moffitt « Cowne 



* « « « 



Paper Dealers 



Paper « of • all • Descriptions 



COS Hiiqclcs 



California 



1 ' 1 1 Y s I < I A \ s AM) ^1 IM. I ON s 



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18 



Western Graphic 



Among the Mummers 

Irv the Eyes of the Critic- -Coming Events 



WHEN a playwright looks around for ma- 
terial to construct a play he does not 
take kindly to the ordinary phases of life 
and the things and circumstances connected there- 
with. He must have men and incidents out of the 
usual run, unless he be, indeed, a very great 
dramatist, when he takes the common things of 
this world and idealizes them or makes them so 
strong in the presentation that they tell a story 
that has never been brought home before to the 
persons who make up the audience which is to 
be entertained by the concrete result of the play- 
wright's search. When this play to be written is 
what is known as of a satirical cast, his work is 
much easier, his material is at hand for the ask- 
ing. All he has to do is to take bizarre speci- 
mens of humanity, freaks of social or other con- 
dition, string them in a row like pupets and then, 
at his will, do funny capers, and the world laughs 
with him. It does not appear to strike the average 
auditor that he is not looking at real life, a con- 
dition made up of all sorts of moving and acting 
figures, which blend together more or less har- 
moniously; he finds it very easy to laugh at a 
blase roue who thinks less of a woman he has 
married than of a fine horse in his stables, to look 
patiently on the man who lays himself out to per- 
sistently attack the virtue of his best friend's 
wife. This average auditor probably comforts 
himself with the reflection that he is not looking 
upon real life, for there is a vague notion in the 
minds of many people that the people on the stage 
do and say things that would carry their own 
punishment with them if they were to happen in 
the broad light of day in the thoroughfare of Van- 
ity Fair, and there is a good deal of the picture 
book business about what is shown upon the 
stage. 

"Aristocracy" is a case in point. The hero is a 
self-made, clear-headed man, who has enhanced 
his self-respect to such an extent by his success, 
that he has all the dignity of his race. He is a 
man of high instinct and honesty, who lives up 
to his promptings, who knows the world and the 
manikins who do their little turns in it, and he 
holds the pretensions of the nobility of an older 
socal condition in proper scorn, although he fully 
appreciates the use he can make of them and their 
kind. He knows the fetish of a name, he sees a 
degenerate scion of an old house given a weight, a 
consideration and a respect that is denied self- 
made men of wealth and integrity. He aims to 
gain a footing where so many have failed to en- 
ter, and with a Western shrewdness he puzzles out 
the conditions and concludes that the stamp of 
European social prestige will open the doors that 
would remain closed to him and his forever, if he 
made his assault along the old lines. He therefore 
rents a London house from an impoverished and 
purse-hunting sprig of English nobility, hires him 
to introduce his friends and lend eclat to the name 
of Stockton, and with the halo of this bought suc- 
cess about him batters down the walls of American 
exclusiveness with ease. 

It has cost him a pretty penny, but he doesn't 
begrudge it. What hurts most is that the moral 
freaks who have entered into his life, like the 
worms and caterpillars that may have lodged in 
the flowers he has bought, tortured his heart by 
their adherence to their own depraved code of 
morals. A rotten fragment of an old and once re- 
spected house has married his daughter in spite 
of him, and he has to nearly kill the prince in 
order to get rid of him after he had attempted to 
mislead his own mother-in-law. Then there is the 
groom's bosom friend, who, however, gets a glim- 
mering of honor when he looks into the "heart of 
a pure woman" and tells his friend some unpleas- 
ant things, coupling them with the moral state- 
ment that he had determined to reform and lead 
a better life, one with Nanette in Paris, "as a 
respectable bachelor." The impecunious English 
Marquis, the hired sponsor of the American place- 
seekers, is rather a harmless individual who is 
frank in his desire to marry almost any one who 
has money enough to get him out of debt; the 
American descendants of Dutch traders who put 
on more frills than their trans-Atlantic patterns, 
all these people are shown in this modern play 
that aims to be a heavy satire. 

But the author went too far in selecting his con- 
trasts to the American nobleman by surrounding 
him with types of what is worst in Eastern and 
foreign society. They are almost burlesques, for 
we are not without sin and the foreign satirist 
has no difficulty in finding among us freaks that 
he might pass off as typical specimens as readily 
as Mr. Howard has seen fit to do with some 
curios he has garnered from European fields. His 
purpose is too patent, and it is therefore not to 
be wondered at that on the play's first presenta- 
tion on this coast seven years ago it played to a 
frost. It is entertaining enough, in its way, and 
is amusing to those who will laugh at the author's 
broad dabs of vivid color, but its factitious value 
as a picture of actual conditions is against it. 

Such as it is, however, the Neill Company have 
made the most of it during the week at the Bur- 



bank. The dignified, self-reliant, self-made man 
of sturdy part was given a vital entity of con- 
siderable force by Mr. Neill, and in this role he 
commanded more respect than in others wherein 
the histrionic clothes fitted less snugly. Jefferson 
Stockton shines out of his surroundings with a 
healthy light, the phosporescence of the putridity 
of the others is made to yield and dissipate it- 
self. Miss Chapman, as the young wife of the 
Californian, who despite her faith in her hus- 
band is yet conquered by the unholy fascination 
of a serpent, played the part with discretion, and 
notably in the trying scene of the third act, with 
good judgment and a nice balance. To Mr. How- 
ard fell the unpleasant task of the serpent on the 
domestic hearth, and he was a most excellent vil- 
lain. One could almost extend to him the hand 
of sympathy, for he was so thoroughly callous to 
moral impressions that one felt that as he was 
brought up that way much should be forgiven him. 
He was an uncomfortable man to have around 
where there were impressionable wives, however. 
Mr. McVicars, as in everything he undertakes, 
displayed his versatile talent in the role of the 
French Due, a gentleman who was at heart hale 
enough to tell the American aristocrats that rank 
cut no figure with him and all men were equal be- 
fore the law, social or otherwise, and the persona- 
tion was a clever one in that it impressed you less 
than some of the others as being in the nature of 
a caricature. Mr. Bloomquest did the best he 
could with the English morsel of insipidity which 
fell to his part, a generalization that applies also 
to the roles filled by the other gentlemen of the 
company. Miss Lamkin did not appreciate to the 
full the possibilities of her role as Virginia Stock- 
ton; Miss Dean, on the other hand, making quite 
a pretty sketch of the volatile American girl, who 
had a sensible estimate of things about her. Miss 
Andrews was not called upon to do very much in 
her role of an American patrician. The stage set- 
tings were adequate. 

^8 

The best of the newcomers on the Orpheum bill 
this week are the Tobins, who give the most re- 
fined and meritorious musical act that has ever 
graced the vaudeville stage. An excellent bari- 
tone solo is given by Mr. Tobin, accompanied 
brilliantly on the piano by the lady. A French 
horn solo by Miss Tobin, slide trombone duets and 
a potpourri of poular melodies on a fine maram- 
ba completed an entertaining and finished per- 
formance. In the conventional dress of the draw- 
ing room the pair make a fine appearance, Miss 
Tobin especially being a handsome woman. 

Another delight to the eye — the masculine eye. 
at least — is Caroline Hull, who sings with a deep 
contralto voice, which could almost be called bari- 
tone. She is a woman of magnificent proportions, 
has a pleasant personality and puts magnetism in 
her work. It would be an improvement, though, if 
she would accelerate the tempo of all her songs. 
One loses the melody in the lown-drawn out tones, 
pleasing though the quality may be. 

Mazie King is a toe dancer with a perpetual 
smile and muscles of steel. With the help of a 
little gaudy stage paraphernalia she introduces 
some new features in that branch of the art of 
dancing. But the beauty of the grace and abandon 
of the danseuse does not appeal to theater-goers as 
it did a decade ago, and Miss King's work was not 
adequately appreciated. 

Sheckles and Davidson received the heartiest en- 
couragement in their act. The two Los Angeles 
boys are poems of physical development and dis- 
play considerable ability as tumblers. With the 
addition of a little speed and a lengthening of 
their act they will be in the front row of acrobats. 

Adgie is on the boards again with her den of 
lions and by her utter fearlessness tortures the 
nerves of the timid and thrills the brave with her 
acts of daring. The beasts are larger than most 
trick lions and give vent to some roars that make 
the most stolid spectator jump. Next Saturday 
the matinee will be further enlivened by feeding 
the lions in full view of the audience immediately 
after the show. 

The holdovers on the bill repeat their acts of 
last week. 

< jt ..<* 
Orpheum 

It looks like the Orpheum management is tell- 
ing the cold truth when the assertion is made that 
next week's vaudeville bill at the Orpheum is to be 
one of the very greatest aggregations of talent 
ever gathered together on one programme. 

John Mason, the distinguished actor, heads the 
list of new features. With Katherine Grey, late 
leading woman of Richard Mansfield Company, 
Mr. Mason is to appear in a comedy drama. Hav- 
ing received permission from his manager, Daniel 
Frohman. to appear at four of the leading vaude- 
ville theaters of the country during the summer, 
Mr. Mason is now en tour, the Orpheum theaters 
in San Francisco and Los Angeles being among the 
four visited by him and Miss Grey. Mason is the 
leading man of the Frohman Company at Daly's 
theater in New York. 



Zelma Rawlston, the great male impersonator, 
who has come direct from London to the coast; 
the Nichols sisters, black face comediennes; the 
St. Onge brothers, trick and comedy cyclists; Ad- 
gie and her lions; Mazie King, the toe dancer; 
Caroline Hull, contralto singer and the Tobins, 
musicians, are all on the bill. 

jt :< ,< 

Morosco's 

Mr. James Neill and his incomparable company 
present for the first time in Los Angeles, Jerome 
K. Jerome's drama in three acts, "The Maister of 
Woodbarrow," at Burbank theater commencing to- 
morrow night. The actions of the play take place 
in England and is full of heart interest and senti- 
ment, being one of those plays of which the "Old 
Homestead" is an American type. It has been a 
tremendous success wherever it has been presented 
and was only secured by Mr. Neill after great 
trouble and expense, as the reputation of Mr. Je- 
rome K. Jerome, who a'so wrote 'Miss Hobbs," had 
created a tremendous demand for anything from 
the pen of this talented author. The production 
will be all that is desired in the way of scenery 
and effects, and the peice being in the hands of 
Mr. Neill and his excellent company is bound to 
be as big a success here as it has been every- 
where else. 

The handsome engraving of Byron L. Oliver, 
one of the Republican candidates for Congress, 
which appeared on the front page of last week's 
Western Graphic, was made from a photograph 
taken at the Scholl gallery, and reflects great credit 
on the photographic artist who produced it. 

jyiOROSCO'S BURBANK THEATER 

Oliver Morosco, Lessee and Manager 

Matinee Today and Tonight, last times of the Neills' 
in "Aristocracy" 

Commencing tomorrow night and all week — Matinee 
Saturday only, 

HR. JAMES NEILL 

AND THE INCOMPARABLE 

NEILL COMPANY 

Presenting Jerome K. Jerome's beautiful drama 

'•The Maister of Woodbarrow" 

Mr. James Neill as Allen Rollitt 

Miss Edythe Chapman as Deborah Dexter 
Prices 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c. Note — Children under 7 
years of age not admitted to any Neill performance. 

MAIN STREET 
BET. FIE8T 
AND SECOND 
Lob Angeles' 
Family Vaudeville 
Theater 

Week Commencing Honday, Aug. 13 

Mr. and Mrs. John Mason, presenting "Another Story" 

Nichols Sisters, Character Impersonators 

St. Onge tiros.. Greatest Comedy Cyclists on Earth 

/■ I in- 1 Kawlston, Clever Change Artiste 

Caroline Hull, the Triple- Voiced Vocalist 

Mazie King, the Marvelous Tip-toe Dancer 

The Tobins, Novelty Instrumentalists 

A.lgU, "The Ludy of Lions"— one week only 

PRICES never changing— 25c and 50c: Gallery 10c. Matinees 
Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday; 25c to any part of the 
house; Gallery 10c; Children 10c any seat. 

Imperial Concert Hall 
r and Cate v* <m 

Family Restaorant-^^^^s^^^S«j^ 

and Oyster Parlors^* 

243 S. SPRING STREET «n« 

Phone lOl 242 s. broadwav... 

Grand Concerts daily from 12 noon to 1.30 p. m. 
6 to 7 and 8 to 12 evenings. Orchestra under direction 
of P. J. Franks, late of Chicago. Everything first-class. 

Tlieaier Parties a Specialty 
HALMER & PUTZMAN, Managers. £ 

Joseph Maier, George Zobelein 5> 

Pres. and Treas. Vice-Pres. and Sec'y w 

HOME INDUSTRY KEEP MONEY AT HOME 

MAI ER & ZOBELEIN 





BREWERY... 



Incorporated 

444 ALISO STREET 

TEL. M. 01. Los Angeles, Ca 



Western Graphic 
With the Butterflies 

Doings ^ Among ^ People 5 in the ^ Gay ^ Life 



19 



WE'RE getting to be just like the old nursery 
rhyme: 

And everywhere that Mary went 
Dear John was sure to go. 

Only the rhyme wasn't quiet that way and my 
name is not Mary, it's Mary Ann. 

But otherwise the rhyme is just like us. Not 
that John really wants to go. Married men don't 
like going and John made me promise that when 
we did the beaches this summer. I would not want 
to go where it was convenient to "lug bundles" 
from town; I was not to telephone him and if I 
asked him to attend any of those monkey dances 
he would kick. 

John is not a kicker — except on occasions. But 
since we have been "going in society" I like to 
keep my eyes on him. Men are so queer. And 
after they are married, they think every other 
young fellow "such an ahs, don't you know" and 
want to go off somewheres by themselves — or by 
somebody else. 

When a man has children it is quite different. 
That fixes him. And do you know I have noticed 
that those very young blades that wiseacres and 
old Grundies shake their heads over — when they 
get married they are the very ones that turn in 
and look after the chicks. And if the maid is sick 
or has gone to her Aunt's funeral for the sixth oi 
seventh time in the year it is always Mr. Young 
Society Htifcband who undresses the baby and 
puts it to bed. It is true. I give you my word. 
There was Mr. 

I was just about to remark — speaking of bars — 
that among the gay butterflies this season one of 
the most discussed topics is whether or not a 
sideboard is essential to the bonhomie of a sea- 
side hotel. It reminds me of the pease pudding 
of Mother Goose times "Some like it hot and 
some like it cold." Some think a sideboard where 
ladies and gentlemen are equally at home is quite 
the thing, some think that a lady who thinks she 
needs a finger length had better confine it to the 
precincts of her boudoir rather than among the 
fumes of cigarette smoke and within sound of the 
click of the billiard ball. 

It is true that the sociability that arises in one 
quarter through the bonhomie inseparable from 
"when two or three are gathered together" re- 
solves into a dignified though somewhat chilly re- 
serve. And to return to the Mother Goose quon- 
dam: Some like it gay and hilarious, some like 
it decorous and well bred. Can the hilarity and 
good breeding go together? Don't ask me. John 
says I always put my foot in it and I don't like 
that. If I can't get there with both feet I don't 
want to get there at all. 

However, I notice that most all rules work a 
number of ways. What a hotel loses in one re- 
spect from the absence or presence of "a side- 
board," it gains in another. "You pays your 
money and you takes your choice." 

There is nothing like travel that sharpens up 
dull points. John says — that is since he is in the 
swim — that he thinks it would be such a good 
thing if all of Los Angeles society were sent out 
in one big sailing vessel on its travels to see some- 
thing of the world. T o be swell one really should 
do it. I remember distinctly years ago when we 
used to ply between Sassamansville and Boyer- 
town, Pa., via the stage coach once a year or so, 
it was a regular educator. You could buy your- 
self one of those fashion books every year and 
altogether it gave you quite an "air." There were 
the people that stayed home from one year's end 
to the other and they never had anything to talk 
about but their gardens and the price of eggs. 
Now if Los Angeles took a little trip out of town 
now and then you wouldn't get so horribly mixed 
between the society columns in the papers and the 
price of oil. The other day I read nearly two col- 
umns of stuff before I knew that it was the oil 
exchange. I had read so many iamiliar names. 
John is trying to strike it in oil. He really must. 
Our friends will know by "the whereabouts of 
prominent people" hereafter how it materializes. 
If it says that we have moved out to our ranch 
in Garvanza then we have "retired from the field" 
and will go to raising cain. If we are scheduled 
as owning one of those "noiseless" machines that 
go like a couple of thrashing machines, then you 
may know we struck it rich. "By their automo- 
biles ye shall know them" was surely spoken of 
us. 

t}£ t$ 

There was some little society in town this week. 
We came home a purpose. Mr. and Mrs. Ezra 
Stimson had a theater party one evening for Miss 
Anna Fay, who has just returned from a European 
trip. It was quite a swell affair. And Mr. John 
Singleton likewise entertained with a theater par- 
ty, the guests numbering eight prominent mem- 
bers of society. 

Among other returns from abroad in the young- 
er set is Miss Alice Graves, daughter of Dr. Graves, 
who is again gathering about her the popularity 
of former days. Miss Graves has been at Terminal 
for a time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ezra Stimson also gave a dinner 



one evening last week for Mrs. Robert D. Clark, 
of Peoria, who is making her annual visitation 
here, and for Mrs. Clark's sister. Miss Sara Good- 
rich. The dinner was informal, but a wholly de- 
lightful affair. 

On Monday Mrs. Caroline M. Severance enter- 
tained the board of managers of the kindergarten 
association with a card party at her rustic little 
home on West Adams street. Verandahs, cool and 
shady, and the picturesque lawn were brought into 
requisition for the affair and a thoroughly enjoy- 
able afternoon was spent. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. K. Carson of Westlake avenue 
had a very pretty affair at their home on Tues- 
day evening in honor of the eighteenth birthdav 
of Miss Daisy White. Then Mr. and Mrs. Lyman 
Craig had a dinner party and Miss May Smith ol 
Westlake entertained a number of her young 
friends in honor of Mrs. W. Holvard of Joplin. 
Mo. 

A number of the young people of society will 
go down to Santa Monica on Saturday for the tour- 
naments; the golf will take place on that day, the 
tennis starting on Monday. A crowd of the young 
people are planning to go over from Redondo and 
for a period of ten days all the resorts will be 
more or less dead to the world while the tourna- 
ment is in progress. 

I see those two young doctors Bryant and Ains- 
worth are at home from their European trip and 
are as handsome as ever — if not more so. One of 
the benefits of the sailing vessel travels. How- 
ever, I must be careful. They really did not go 
because they needed it, but to be in the swim. 

I hear that you can't even get a drop of alcohol 
to curl your hair at Santa Monica without a pre- 
scription. Think of that. And when Dr. John 
went down on Saturday he had to write an Rx 
for all the sweet swelldom of the Arcadia hotel. 
I do not know what the great doctor said it was 
for. The clerk couldn't read it. That is to say — 
nothing but the alcohol part. Well, that was all 
that was necessary wasn't it? 

Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Slauson and Mrs. Vosburg 
are among the Angelenos who are going to Santa 
Monica for the tournament. Mr. and Mrs. O. W. 
Childs and the Blaisdells are off to Coronado. So 
are Mr. and Mrs. Barker and the various members 
of that particular circle. Terminal had a vaude- 
ville show in which the two young Maxwells dis- 
tinguished themselves. I hear there was not much 
audience. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Storrow, formerly of Den- 
ver, Colorado, who have spent two winters in Los 
Angeles, are at the Arcadia hotel for the summer. 
The Storrows were prominent people of Denver 
and are most delightful to meet. 

Miss Julia Winston is a guest of Mrs. Wilbur 
Parker at her old home in Cleveland, Ohio. 

Mrs. Wilcox, Mrs. Longstreet and Mr. Alfred 
Wilcox, I am told, are having a delightful time at 
Del Monte. 

Miss Ella Heinzeman will return home next 
week from a visit with friends in San Francisco. 

t$ 

After August 15th Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Cowles 
will occupy the residence of Mr. W. H. Halliday, 
corner Adams and Hoover, until they build a 
handsome home adjoining. Mrs. Cowles receives 
on the third and fourth Wednesdays. Mrs. Hill 
and daughter of Chicago are guests of the Cowles'. 

Good Gracious! Where have I left John? 

ANN IDLER. 

t$ 

Considerable talk is now being indulged in by 
the newspapers about the physical degeneracy and 
blood taint of princes. The occasion of this is the 
recent death of Queen Victoria's second son, of 
cancer, and the supposed last illness of his sister, 
the Empress Dowager of Germany from the same 
disease. A brother of these unfortunate scions of 
royalty died at an early age because his skin was 
so thin that it could not retain the blood of the 
body. Cndoubtedly all the English princes have 
received blood taint from a long line of ancest- 
ors, especially their crazy old great-grandfather 
George III, who had so much trouble with his 
American colonies about 1776. But it had been 
handed down even to him. Good, virtuous Queen 
Victoria, and her equally exemplary consort. 
Prince Albert, are not to blame for this taint, and 
we have to look back to the third or fourth gen- 
eration, but its genesis comes not because of roy- 
al blood so much as from royal modes of living. 
Good red blood comes from the lower classes; and 
the deterioration which makes the blood of 
princes and all those living lives of ease and often 
debauchery "blue" comes from the lack of those 
activities which go to build up perfect physical 
men and women. Hard, grinding toil, unrelieved 
by seasons of rest, has a brutalizing effect upon a 
race, but even this is more hopeful for eventual 
evolution to a better condition than where the 
physical man is tainted by the debauchery of his 
ancestors. The yeomanry of England has been 
the nation's strength, and she has always received 
her greatest men from their ranks; in America 
this is equally true, and our only danger lies In 
the degeneracy that may come from the abnorm- 



Too 

Cheap 

to 

Miss 



IX/ HEN you think that the 
Wkstkk n Graphic 
costs only 25 cents a month 
you should take another 
think and send in your order. 
The monthly subscription is 
collected by a coin remittance 
card, which is mailed you to- 
gether with a stamped return 
envelope. By this system 
you are not annoyed by petty 
collections nor embarassed 
by the inopportune presenta- 
tion of a big delinquent bill. 
It's pay as you go and stop 
when you please. Put a 
quarter in the card and 



Uncle 
Sam 

Does the 

Rest 



>ti jjj jjj iImImImI; it/ ijjjji >>/ it/ \ti >li >(<>!/ \inli ill jjj jjj \)/ \li >!/>!/ jjj jjj \li \ii Unit \ti lb id 



Westlake Hotel 

720 Westlake Avenue 



J. B. DUISK 

Proprietor 



Overlooking beautiful Westlake Park — most desir- 
able location in the city. 
Elegant bedrooms, single or en suite. 
Splendid cuisine. 



Rates $ 2.00 
per day and up 



Special rates 
to families bv the month 



<)\ f|> f»\ n\ i> t» tv n\ »t> /»\ ')\ t\ '(> n\ »»\ <|\ '»« '»> t> i»< i> i> i> i< t > i> i> m t» 1< t> i> t> t> 



mount Eowe Railway 

Magnificent Panorama of Karth and Ocean 
Grandest Trip on Karth 

ECHO MOUNTAIN HOUSE 

SITUATED on the summit of Echo Mountain, 
3500 feet above sea level, commanding a grand 
panoramic view of Southern California— a high 
class hotel. Beautifully furnished appartments 
with or without baths Cuisine unexcelled. 

Hotel Rates $12.50 and up per week 

SPECIAL 

Guests remaining one week or longer will be al- 
lowed a rebate of their Mount Lowe Railway fare 
to Echo Mountain and return and a fiOc. round trip 
rate to Los Angeles, and 40c to Pasadena daily if 
desired. 

Tickets and full Information 

CLARENCE A. WARNER 

Truffle and Kxi uibIiiii Agent 

214 South Spring St. - - Los Angeles Cal. 
Tel. Main 960 



ally rich. Our great prosperity is a greater men- 
ace to the nation than is the unrest which comes 
from the under stratum of society. 

Lovers of the fascinating game of polo will be 
pleased to ham that the races under the auspices 
of the Southern California Polo Club will takv. 
place at the Ocean Park track on the 31st of Au- 
gust and the 1st of September. The season at 
Ocean Park is just now at its height. Never be- 
fore have been there as many pretty cottages 
erected in one season at any beach as has been 
the case at Ocean Park this year, all of which is 
an evidence of the fact that in spending a sum- 
mer at the beach people wish to be right down on. 
the water front. 




POiTKD CHINESE ANCESTORS. 

Tin: Chinese worship their ancestors, and every native, from the highest to the lowest, 
has an abnormal reverence for the bones of the members of his family who have passed 
away. It is said that to this sentiment is, in a measure, due the antipathy the Chinese feel 
towards certain enterprising foreigners, who have, in the const ructing of railways and other 
large works, shown a lack of respect for the sacred ground in and on which reposes the 
ashes and bones of the revered ancestors. Certain it is that cemeteries are scattered all 
over China, being not only unusually numerous but frequently found in the most unexpected 
places. Some of the Chinese have a gmesome custom of potting their ancestors, and the 
accompanying illustration, taken from a photograph made by two English officers when 
carrying on exploration work near Hongkong, will give a good idea of what a graveyard of 
this sect of Chinese looks like. The bones of a dead Chinese are in each jar. 



HOTEL 

del Monte 

MOtlTlREY. CALIFORNIA.^ 



In every detail nrul in all it- 
Envionment Ideally 
Calif ornian 




The Most Hagnificent Hotel 
The Most Expansive Landscape 
The Most Varied Forests 
The Most Delightful Temperature 
The Most Superb Flowers 



IN ALL 

AMERICA 



One hundred and twenty = six acres of cultivated 
ground, and almost the whole of the Peninsula 
of nonterey for a playground 



Send for illustrated pamphlet to any agent 
or the Southern Pacific Company, 
of for special monthly rates, write 



W. A. JUNKER 

MANAGER 



! 



The Drill is Dropping 

Hartford Oil Company's 
Well No. 1 

Is now 400 feet deep. Oil was struck in the next well 
south of us at 630 feet. Your chance to get som • of 
this stock at 12)4 cents is rapidly slipping away. 

No more stock will be sold after oil is struck. Call 
at our office and investigate for yourself. Our books 
are open. 

413=415 Currier Building 

Telephone John 1701 
J. S. DILLON, President H. C. DILLON, Secretary 



FIVE COOL RESORTS 



SANTA MONICA . . 
SAN PEDRO . . . 
LONG BEACH . . . 
C ATA LIN A ISLAND 
NEWPORT BEACH 



All quickest and easiest reached via SOUTHERN PACIFIC. 

Ample equipment and speedy service at convenient hours. Special 
attractions at each — camping, bathing, boating, fishing, golf, promenades, 
drives, etc. 

Time cards in newspapers ^nd Los Angeles Railway Co.'s street cars. 



$1.50 



TEN-RIDE 
TICKETS 

Between Los Angeles and Smta Monica, San Pedro or Long Beach 
Good for yourself and friends 



I A. R. MAINES MFG. CO. 

435 S. Spring St., Los Angeles. 



Orient 
Bicvcles 



§ SIX HODELS 



Women's Pacific 




Coast Oil Co. 

I IN CO re f»o R f\ T E D 



Capital $300,000 

StOCK Bomun 



1? 1? To Choose From 



Fully paid and Non-assessable 
Par Value $1.00 

An Open Letter to Our Stockholders 

SUMMERLAND, CAL., JULY 6, 1900. 
Women'.* Pacific Cods/ Oil Q>., Los Aiir/rtrx. Cat. 

Ladies:— Contract for II iekey & Kobinsou received and delivered. 1 nave to report 
that work is begun on the derrick, and that the drillers expect to be aide to begin drill- 
ing next Tuesday. It will be necessary for you to buy and ship the 7"„ casing at once. 
I presume the best that can be done with be notice given will be to get it started on 
the freight Monday. 1 told them 1 would write to you today, ordering you to ship it, 
and that seemed to be satisfactory to them. I am very sincerely yours, 

(►WIGHT KEMPTOX. 



! 



Till 



Absolutely the Best bicycle 
in the Market . . . 



334 Copp Building, 218 S. Broadway 



LOS ANGELES. CAL. 



riioiin .p ..1. 11 i i s i 



GEO. RICE & SONS. (Inc.) LOS ANGELES. 



WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

<Jln Illustrated Family Weekly of t/?e Sovithwest 

WITH WHICH IS CONSOLIDATE: I> THE LOB ANGELES B U N D A ! w 0 K L D A N I) C ALIFOBNIA 0 t' B ! <> 

SLw^lSSS fx x . v, "|Na7. Los Angeles, Saturday, August 18, 1900. Price 10 Cents 





CARROLL, THE WHISTLER 

The Los Angeles n'\r\ who is scoring ;i sucecss at the California Theater, San I-'ram i-i n, 
with the Brownies in Fairyland 




WESTERN 
GRAPH IC 

Illustrated Family Weekly of (fie Southwest 

WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED THE 

SUNDAY WORLD and CAL IFORNIA CURIO 
(]i;0. RICH & 50NS, (Inc. i 

rCRI.IfMKD KVKKV .-A I IR f)A T MORNING AT 

811-813 New High street Telephone Main lOM 

ENTEEEO AT THE LOt ANOEIES EOtT OFEICE A • SECOND -CL A «• MATTE* 



SUfiSCRlPT/OMS—Three Dollars a Year; or. Twenty-fire cents 
a month, collected by Remittance Card system, all postage paid 
by the publishers. 

CONTRIBirtlONS—U'e pay cash for accepted contributions, 
those containing photographs for reproduction being most avail- 
able. The usual rules regarding manuscripts should be observed 
to insure consideration . 

'She Editor's Say 

JUST now in Los Angeles the politicians are 
agog over the Congressional question, and 
there are many sides to this question. Ordi- 
narily such matters are left to the decision of the 
voters. The Congressman and his constituents is 
an alliteration that no one has felt at liberty to 
interfere with, the relation approaching that sa- 
cred formula of the marriage service, "whom God 
hath joined together let no man put asunder." 
There is no prescription in any code of morals or 
politics that allows of any dictation between the 
Congressman and his constituent. The choice of 
a candidate for the United States House of Rep- 
resentatives should be absolutely free and un- 
trammeled. This occurs most happily when the 
people spontaneously select their representative, 
or, at least, when political parties are led by a 
sure instinct to the selection of their local polit- 
ical favorites, the mass of the voters being the 
arbiters of last resort at the polls. 

V^t l£r% 

It is doubtful if there has ever been a more 
flagrant instance of pragmatical interference than 
we are now witnessing with the ordinarily undis- 
puted functions of the people in the Sixth Con- 
gressional district. Two factions of the Repub- 
lican party are making the welkin ring with their 
clamors. One faction, represented by Major-Gen- 
eral Harrison Gray Otis, announces that, under 
no circumstances, shall ex-Congressman MeLacfr- 
lan be nominated for Congress, uttering all sorts 
of dire threats should its command be disregarded. 
Its principal argument seems to be that, as it 
defeated Mr. McLachlan before, his friends should 
beware of exposing him again to the wrath of the 
Los Angeles Daily Times and Weekly Mirror, with 
Magazine Addition. Prior treasons to its party 
are rarely advanced by political journals as 
grounds for obedience to its mandates. But the 
habit of exercising high military authority, both 
before and after passing Rubicons, abides with the 
doughty editor of the Times. He has evidently 
long coddled himself with the idea that he is su- 
preme. He seems to look upon himself somewhat 
after the style of Robinson Crusoe, at least as 
respects the precincts of the Sixth Congressional 
District. In his mind's eye. 

My will there is none to dispute; 
From the center all round to the sea, 
I am lord of the fowl and the brute. 
Or perhaps we might vary the simile, and 
dropping from De Foe into Shakspeare, the self- 
elected, self-erected despot, sometimes solaces him- 
self with the charming strophe. 
My face doth cream and mantle like a standing 
pond. 

As who shall say, "I am Sir Oracle, 

And when I ope my lips let no dog bark." 

However the Major-General of happy Rubicon 
memory may regard himself, there are many, yea 
many, of the "many-headed multitude," who don't 
care "deuce aces" who his choice for Congressman 
is, and who think that he had better come off 
his perch p. d. q. or he will be incontinently 
knocked off by the force of circumstances, public 
ridicule and the determination of a free and in- 
telligent constituency to nominate whom it may 
please them to nominate, for Congress or any posi- 
tion in their gift. Many of the voters, as between 
McLachlan and Gen. Otis's favorite or favorites 
for Congress, are in the mood of Mercutio in the 
wars of the Montagues and Capulets, and are 
ready to exclaim: "A plague o' both your houses." 

To the philosopher the attitude of the Times in 
the present Congressional crisis is fatuous in the 
extreme. For months it has been harping on the 
necessity of electing a Republican House of Rep- 
resentatives, assuming that it will be only half a 
victory if McKinley should be elected without a 
Republican house to sustain him. Yet, if its pres- 
ent attitude means anything, it means that, should 
MeLachlan compass the nomination, the Times 
would not support him. This is in line with the 
traditional arrogance of the principal owner and 
editor of that journal. He does business ex- 
clusively on the principle of the hunter with the 
Indian, "heads I win. tails you lose." This potent 
politician has not stopped to consider as to what 
Republicans will think of a policy so destructive 



of party morale. So great is the distrust created 
by the domineering policy of the Times that a 
wealthy and influential section of the Republican 
party have purchased the old Herald, Democratic 
from its inception till the other day; and, should 
the Times dare to oppose McLachlan in the quite 
possib'e event of his nomination, not all the fine 
plant and the prestige of that paper will prevent 
the habitat of the Eagle from being shaken from 
turret to foundation stone. We charge our con- 
temporary nothing for this information, being 
quite well aware that it would pay us nothing 
if we did. 

The truth is that the Times and its militant 
editor are at the parting of the ways, and that 
the sovereign people will not permit themselves 
to be dictated to. 

.<* J* 

The searching sidelights that are being thrown 
upon the grotesque farce enacted by William Jen- 
nings Bryan and his Socialistic, Populistic, Demo- 
cratic combination under the guise of patriotism 
and political chastity, must cost Mr. Bryan 
and his patriot henchmen many hours of unhappy 
thought, not to say consternation. That awful 
crime of Ben Tillman and his fellow conspirators 
in North Carolina, whereby thousands of law-abid- 
ing American citizens have been disfranchised, has 
met with no rebuke from the man who seeks the 
suffrages of this great free people, on the plea 
that the safety of our republic and the perpetua- 
tion of civil and religious liberty as guaranteed 
by the Constitution, can only be secured by his 
elevation to the Presidential chair. Not only is 
this so, but so far as we have seen, not a single 
voice from among his ardent supporters has been 
raised in protest against this dastardly act. 

Does udr, Bryan and the so-called Democratic 
party endorse this treasonable crime of 1900, that 
their electoral vote may be increased instead of 
diminished? 

Of all the cruel but well deserved blows thus far 
given to the aspirations of Bryan in his desperate 
struggle tor Presidential honors, the cruelest is 
that just delivered by the aged Senator from Mas- 
sachusetts. With merciless hands the venerable 
statesman tears the mask from Bryan, and shows 
up in their true colors the hypocrisy and deceit 
which underlie the windy ebullitions of the boy 
orator. "I must have something better than these 
declarations against 'imperialism' from the man 
who secured the passage of the treaty and baffled 
all efforts I was able to make against it, before 
I am ready to purchase his election at the cost 
of having a government that will sympathize with 
the disfranchisement of 10,000.000 Americans at 
home," are the stinging words of Senator Hoar. 

The latest news from Managua, Nicaragua, con- 
veys the intelligence that the Eyre-Cragin canal 
concession has been forfeited, the syndicate de- 
faulting in payment of the sum due under the 
provisions of the concession. This forfeiture 
clears the way for Uncle Sam to go ahead with- 
out being subjected to the extortionate demands of 
financial sharpers, whose aim in securing the con- 
cession was evidently to fleece the government out 
of a good round bonus. It is an evil mind that 
doesn't carry a little good luck, and we may soothe 
our impatience somewhat at the slow action of 
Congress, with the reflection that this scheme of 
the Eyre-Cragin combination to bunco Uncle 
Samuel miscarried. 

,4 .< jl 

The County Board of Education has adjusted 
itself to circumstances, and the decent members 
of the board are now arrayed for justice and right 
against the pair who defy public opinion and care 
not even for the brand of disgrace put upon them 
by the grand jury. W. M. Wright and Luther G. 
Brown are the two whose names now appear on 



the minutes in opposition to every proposition in- 
volving the improvement of our school adminis- 
tration; but it is cause for congratulation that this 
two of a kind are in the minority and that their 
schemes will be of no avail while the running of 
the educational system is under the experienced 
and honest care of Messrs. French, Trltt and 
Strine. 

It is quite a spectacle to see two county officials 
at war over $2.50 to the point of going into court 
about it. It is a unique issue at law when the 
quality of Uncle Sam's wampum is questioned on 
account of a foreign odor attaching thereto, and it 
now behooves every American citizen when receiv- 
ing coin of the realm to not only subject it to the 
usual tests of ringing and biting, but to also care- 
fully smell the metal discs before accepting them 
as legal tender. Coroner Holland is a poor man 
to have fun with. It would occur to the average 
man about town to "set 'em up" when the joke was 
turned upon them as neatly as Treasurer Jones 
played it upon Holland, instead of prancing into 
court with a suit for a writ of mandamus to com- 
pel the Treasurer to perfume the money that Hol- 
land himself placed in his hands, tie, fie. Mr. Cor- 
oner! Take a pattern from the boys of the streets 
and become a thoroughbred. 

s^f 

Many thousand once deluded mortals have noted 
with pleasure in the news of the week that the 
State Medical Association is to inaugurate an ag- 
gressive campaign against the quack doctors that 
infest the large cities, especially Los Angeles. The 
robbing practices of some of these institutions is 
an appalling condition where the facts are known. 
A gentleman who recently visited one of these hu- 
man spiders began a "treatment" at $2.50 per 
week to the extent of submitting to a diagnosis 
and accepting the first two bottles of "medicine." 
This he took to a druggist acquaintance, who ana- 
lyzed one as simply chalk and water and the other 
as common water made slightly bitter with quassia. 

Some of these quacks are possessed of enough 
medical skill to bolster up a patient with stimu- 
lants and tonics to a point where they can play 
upon his hopes for ultimate recovery for manv 
shining gold pieces. If there is any way to squelch 
the unprincipled medicos the entire thinking pub- 
lic will join in the movement with energy. 

In this connection it is meet that Western 
Graphic should call attention to the fact that 
quacks and nostrums are not allowed the use of 
its advertising columns, and can particularize 
where many hundreds of dollars of such business 
has been refused. 

4 .4 

Quite the sensation of a year in Los Angeles has 
been the Slovensky case, which terminated so ab- 
ruptly last Monday morning by the suicide of the 
man who played the title role in the drama. The 
affair of the jealous husband, alleged blackmail, 
and self murder, presents many interesting prob- 
lems in psychology, though it is probable that 
students in this line will never come into posses- 
sion of all the facts, that their conclusions might 
be verified or reversed. The peculiar similarity of 
the facts as alleged on both sides permits of an 
almost identical synthesis with either story, 
though there is room for much speculation at every 
step. But whatever the details there are sufficient 
grounds to warrant the belief that the alleged vic- 
tim of the blackmailing at least committed indis- 
cretions under unfortunate circumstances, and laid 
the foundation for serious accusations. In it all 
there is a moral: That the thoughtless, if not 
deliberate peccadilloes of one person should cause 
the suicide of one man, the ruin of a woman's rep- 
utation, a blight upon another man and his fam- 
ily's honor, ought to suggest the preference of the 
straight and narrow path of circumspection to all 
men. 



The Dee^d Railway Magnate 

By Joseph D . Lynch 



ALL over the world the necrologies,! 1 rolls will 
contain longer or shorter articles devoted 
to the late Collis P. Huntington. It is be- 
coming increasingly difficult for any man to com- 
mand large space in biographical dictionaries. 
Erudition itself has become a matter of index 
learning; and it is doubtful if ten years from now 
one man in a hundred by the utmost efforts of 
memory will be able to recall any distinct memory 
of who Collis P. Huntington was, or will know 
aught of financial achievements which may fairly 
be called gigantic of which he was the hero. 

The late railway magnate, like so many other 
giants of industry and finance, was born and raised 
on a New England farm, about eighty years ago. 
His father was a combination of a tinker and a 
farmer, but of good New England stock on both 
sides. His life was uneventful until he reached 
Ca'ifornla in the pioneer epoch and was thrown 
into business relations with his late partner Hop- 
kins. It was as the firm of Huntington & Hopkins 
that these men became known to fame. As Sacra- 
mento merchants they became associated with 
Stanford and Crocker, and the four — the Big Four, 



if ever there was such an association in this 
work-a-day world — immediately became the domi- 
nating financial and political force of the Pacific 
Coast and measurably so of the United States. 

I shall not dwell upon the details of the exploita- 
tion of the Central and Southern Pacific railways 
of the United States and of their cognate and 
affiliated branches. The four partners were ad- 
mirably adapted to conciliate every possible shade 
of opinion. It was soon seen that in Collis P. 
Huntington was united every talent needed in the 
man of affairs par excellence. As a negotiator 
with capitalists, as a king of lobbyists at the na- 
tional capital, his talents were soon recognized as 
supreme. Without his indomitable will, persever- 
ance and resourceful mind the transcontinental 
railway would never have been a fact accom- 
plished. At a critical stage of the history of the 
yet uncompleted Central Pacific Railway he took 
up his residence in the city of Washington, and 
he acquired at that time an influence in directing 
national legislation that had never been ap- 
proached in the past and has never been rivaled 
Fince. At times Mr. C. P. Huntington's veto on 
certain lines of national legislation has been as 



Western Graphic 



potent as that of the President himself, and often 
more so. 

Their great work achieved, the restless genius 
of the Big Four evolved the mighty scheme of 
building the Southern Pacific Railway. They con- 
tinued to be the controlling force of the Pacific 
Coast, for good or ill, in all lines, political, finan- 
cial and social. In the early eighties Collis P. 
Huntington encountered an experience which al- 
most wrecked his fortunes. In anticipation of the 
extension of the Southern Pacific Railway over 
Arizona, with a view to the consummation of the 
dream of a Sunset Pacific Railway — a dream 
which was shortly to be accomplished by these in- 
domitable men — Collis P. Huntington had pur- 
chased the Galveston. Harrisburg and San Antonio 
Railway and the Morgan line of steamers. Al- 
most coincidently with this purchase there was a 
great panic in Wall street and consternation 
reigned in the Huntington headquarters. Fortu- 
nately for Huntington he had not "a wicked part- 
ner," but one with a heart of steel, in the person 
of Charles Crocker. That active personage made 
a tour de force on the strong boxes of the San 
Francisco moneyed men, and, as a result, he for- 
warded to Huntington at New York twelve mill- 
ion dollars in gold coin, saving his partner and 
enabling him to buy heavily at reduced figures, 
converting the nettle danger into the flower safety, 
and adding enormously to Huntington's ample but 
imperiled millions. To do this the railway people 
found it necessary to mortgage the Market Street 
Railway system to Flood & O'Brien, and to 
"spout" almost every available security they 
owned. However, "all's well that ends well." 

Of the innumerable controversies with the people 
of the Pacific Coast in which Mr. Huntington and 
his "wicked partners" have been engaged it would 
not be profitable to say much. At the time when 
the people of this coast were most excited. Hunt- 
ington, owing to his frankness of speech and uni- 
versality of talent, was the man most freely vis- 
ited with expressions of the popular wrath. The 
tendency to center popular execration on Hunting- 
ton was greatly increased owing to the publication 
of his letters to D. D. Colton, which were de- 
veloped in the celebrated trial brought by the 
widow of Colton to recover a large sum of money 
from that gentleman's associates in the Central 
Pacific. To compare epistles written in a repub- 
lic to more celebrated ones written in a monarchy, 
these letters are as delightful as those of the Duke 
de St. Simon, written of the French court, two 
hundred years earlier. In these letters Congress- 
man Piper was described as a "hog" — perhaps not 
an inexact description, Congressman Luttrell was 
treated with a detail that dismissed him from pub- 
lic life; and the Call and Bulletin, then under the 
control of the immaculate Pickering and Fitch, 
were described in the operation of being "caved 
down the bank," a descriptive phrase of which 
those gentlemen never heard the last — at least un- 
til Pickering died and Fitch retired from journal- 
ism. 

That C. P. Huntington was the best abused man 
that ever lived in California admits of no doubt. 
At times Charles Crocker was a close second, but 
that really bluff and genial heart of oak never 
knew what it was to be cursed with the genuine 
heartiness which was visited upon the head of 
"Uncle Collis." "Uncle" is ordinarily a term of 
endearment; but, in the case of Huntington, it 
embodied a fanatical hatred. How much of this 
was deserved? How much of it could have been 
avoided? 

In truth, it boots little to argue such questions. 
It is an old adage which says that a man who 
has no enemies is at best a poor creature. There 
was a strong substratum of humor in Collis P. 
Huntington, and it is probable that he came rather 
to enjoy the idea of being looked upon as a "bogy" 
man. At a critical stage of the Southern Pacific 
Railway Company's history the Mussel Slough epi- 
sode came along to envenom things, and to make 
calm argument impossible for the nonce. The 
great hysterical era in which Denis Kearney fig- 
ured was never approached in its violence and 
supposed threatening significance by any other 
event in the merely municipal history of this 
country. There is no doubt that the howls of the 
Sandlotters at the base of Nob Hill frightened 
Hopkins to death in his lately completed palace 
on its summit. Upon the iron nerved Huntington 
Kearney and his crowd, at the height of their pow- 
er, could have made no impression worthy the 
name. 

Perhaps the most interesting question that 
could be discussed in connection with the dead 
railway magnate is, "What would California and 
the Pacific Coast generally have done if Hunting- 
ton and his associates, by hook or by crook, by 
fair means or by foul, had not built the great 
transcontinental railway, just when they did?" 
This is, indeed, a most pregnant proposition. The 
people of tne United States were exhausted after 
a long war. The placer mines had given out in 
California, and quartz mining was in us infancy 
when this magnificent project, preservative of a 
whole section and recrudescent of a mighty na- 
tion, was started by four comparatively obscure 
men. It is not too much to say that, for the na- 
tion at large, the building of the Central and 
Union Pacific Railway saved It from syncope and 
the Pacific Coast from at least temporary extinc- 
tion. 



The building of this road — in the financial op- 
erations of which Huntington's genius was su- 
preme — was followed by treasure developments 
which saved the United States from bankruptcy, 
and which have resulted in our entire emancipa- 
tion from the monetary control of Kurope. As 
one incident of its beneficent effects, take the ex- 
ploitation of the gold and silver measures of the 
Comstock lode alone; which have amounted, since 
1 s:i;r>. t iI625.000.000. Throughthebui'dingof this road 
the whole coast and the whole nation have been 
thrilled as by an electrical dynamo of inconceiv- 
able power. Realization of facts in this line 
should lead many to look kindly upon the career 
of Huntington, the greatest man of a combination 
of men which has never been surpassed in the 
financial history of the world. 

No fair man. however many faults he may have 
discovered in the late C. P. Huntington — and this 
is the season as to him when the gracious old 
Latin aphorism de mortuia nil nisi bonum should 
hold sway — can feel disposed to dispute the fact 
that he was the greatest individual financier that 
ever lived. He handled operations really greater 
in volume than any that were ever manipulated by 
the historically notorious George Law; and Hunt- 
ington dealt with the real, while George Law dealt 
solely with the fanciful. To still further enforce 
the comparison in favor of the American. George 
Law, in his colossal operations, was backed by the 
Regent D'Orleans and the whole power of the 
French government, while Huntington was upheld 
by nobody but his partners, and half his time his 
efforts were countervailed by opposition from 
forces nearly as potent as those which he himself 
controlled, as witness the steady, relentless and al- 
most successful opposition of Col. Thomas A. 
Scott and his Pennsylvania railroad at various 




COLLIS P. HUNTINGTON 
From Munsey's Magazine, Drawn by M. Stein irom a 
copyrighted photograph by Vandtr Weyde, New York 



stages of Huntington's career. To have triumphed 
over such tremendous odds, dying after having 
successfully engineered a fiveJmndred million dol- 
lar railway deal, places Collis P. Huntington in 
the highest niche of the financial Pantheon. It 
would have been cruel to his fame if death had 
visited him six months ago. It came just in the 
nick of time. His carefully matured plans had been 
rounded to completion. Even in the act of death 
he could exclaim, "The past is at least secure." 
His monument is built in the industrial develop- 
ment of California. 

There are probably few people, now that he is 
dead, who will stop to ask whether Collis P. I Minting, 
ton might not have made a better use of his oppor- 
tunities — might not have done this or omitted 
that. The fact is that he was one or the co-ordi- 
nated and predestinated world builders. If he had 
been cast in a milder, more considerate mold, he 
would not have been the first to bridge the Amer- 
ican continent with the iron rail. It was the Has- 
tard of Normandy, with his oath. "My the Splen- 
dor of God," who bore down Saxon Harold, and 
opened England to civilization and to progress. 
Even his enemies now feel, with Huntington dead, 
that, at many stages of his career, we could have 
better spared a better man. If he did not do his 
work as well as all of us could have desired, he 
did it at least in the spirit of the Scriptural in- 
junction, "Whatsoever thou findest to thy hand to 
do, that do thou diligently." 

Angelenos, particularly, have often had occasion 
to criticize Mr. Huntington. He has differed with 
the majority of our people on harbor and other 
questions. Almost for the only time in his long, 
energetic and resistless career, he has met defeat 
at the hands of the people of the Angel City. In 
some respects it may be considered a drawn battle. 
As to whether, at an early stage of the game, some 
middle ground might not have been found profit- 
able to both, is now a matter of bootless specula- 



tion. In the battle between San Pedro harbor and 
Huntington it was a game of Greek meet Greek. 
The general merit, standing and prospects of San 
Pedro will be looked upon as improved conse- 
quent on Huntington's death. A great many 
people will also regard the chances of the com- 
pletion of the Nicaragua canal as in better shape 
now that the President of the Southern Pacific 
Railway and the President of the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company has gone to his last honu 

One of the most Farcical things in newspaper 
history is the treatment which Huntington lias re- 
ceived at the hands of the cartoonist. At least 
one element of a successful caricature is some 
sort of resemblance to the person caricatured — 
something that would enable people to iccognize 
him if he should suddenly walk into an assembly. 
The efforts of the freakish caricaturists to por- 
tray Huntington's person or lineaments were al- 
ways the flattest failures. Instead cf being the 
obese, uncanny creature they depicted him. he was 
one of the most stately and handsome old gentle- 
men in the whole country, with an eye and de- 
meanor indicating intelligence of the highest or- 
der. In all of his rencounters with committees, 
attorneys or newspaper interviewers, he displayed 
a liveliness and wit that was the delight of his 
friends and the despair of his enemies. 

It was a great priviledge to have seen the "Big 
Four" of the Central and Southern Pacific Rail- 
ways in their prime. I had the pleasure cf meet- 
ing Gov. Stanford shortly after my arrival in San 
Francisco, in July, 1872. He was a genuine "t ill 
son of Anak," but so heavy that you scarceiy 
realized his height. Meetings with Crocker and 
Huntington came later. I never remember to have 
seen Hopkins, who was a small man of a most re- 
tiring disposition. Both Crocker and Huntington 
were large and masterful men. Take them for 
all in all, we shall not soon look upon their like 
again. 

The fortune of Huntington is placed by Russell 
Sage at between $20,000,000 and $25,000,000. This 
is highly absurd. When Charles Crocker died 
years ago he was worth between $60,000,000 an.! 
$80,000,000. Huntington was '.always recogni: ed 
as the richest of the four. Stanford, who. was 
always giving away money and lands in unstinted 
measure, after all discounts, left fully $40,000,000. 
A conservative estimate of Huntington's wealth 
would indicate the sum at $75,000,000 to $100 000- 
000. Russell Sage, in placing the sum so low. 
was undoubtedly aiming at protecting his dead 
friend's estate from the inheritance tax. Such 
figures as Sage suggests are ridiculous. The late 
George Hearst's estate was inventoried at $8,000- 
000. A small portion off a corner of it har ; »°pn 
since sold to the Rothscihlds for $7,500,000. Lloyd 
Tevis's estate was handed in at his death at a 
valuation of $7,800,000. There are little angles of it 
that are worth that much, and more. Huntington, 
amongst his other distinctions, was the richest of 
them all 

j/t ,«t j/t 

Many people seem to regard the fact that Los An- 
geles has only a little over 100,000 people a real 
calamity to the city. It would have been gratify- 
ing if we could have shown that our percentage of 
increase was greater than the census shows, but 
considering the adverse circumstances which have 
prevailed in Southern California on account of the 
drought, an increase of 100 per cent, should be re 
garded as satisfactory. The city labors under the 
disadvantage of having the census taken at a time 
of the year when the population is at its lowest 
ebb, and the increase is as great as could reason- 
ably be expected. Doubling the population in ten 
years may be considered a good record for any 
city. And a careful inquiry into the amount of 
business now being done by our business men will 
show that the increase in industrial activity has 
been much greater than in population. Ten years 
ago Los Angeles had no manufacturing interests 
of any moment. Everything which required the 
use of machinery for its manufacture was im- 
ported from the East, and so little attention was 
paid even to agriculture, that by far the greater 
part of what food products were consumed by the 
city came from the East, but now a very large 
portion of our iron, and wood, consumed in build- 
ing and also in heavy machinery and vehicles are 
made by the labor of our own people, and the 
products of our farms more than supplies the re- 
quirements of the population for food. The ship- 
ments of the surplus from our farms is becoming 
no Inconsiderable portion of the income of the 
tillers of the soil. In addition to all this, our 
mines are proving that in mineral resources we 
are richer than our most sanguine citizens ever 
dared to hope, especially in the wonderful develop- 
ment of our oil wells. In ocean commerce, also, 
the advance has been gratifying, and the pros- 
pects for the further expansion of manufacturing 
are so bright that it is safe to assume that Los 
Angeles from the present time, for many years to 
come, will grow rapidly in industrial and commer- 
cial importance, thus furnishing permanent and 
profitable employment to her people. In the above 
nothing has been said of climate and the attrac- 
tions of the city as a place of residence because of 
It, for the reason that these are so apparent that 
they need no exploitation, and the business inter- 
ests of Los Angeles have now become so predomi- 
nant that they have become only incidents In Its 
industrial life. 



I GARDENING I 
CALIFORNIA 



i 



IN 



I 




1 



i 



156 PAGES 

II.I.USTKA ' I) 
KM BOSSED: : 
PAPBB : : : : 
COVKKS : : : 



nTHK ONLY WORK 
^ ever written for this 
soil and climate; entirely 
non-technical and espe- 
cially adapted to amateurs. 
Heretofore sold at 50 CCIUS, 
will be reduced to close 
out an edition to 

2 5 Cents 

and three cents postage. 



GEO. RICE & SONS, inc. 

311-313 
New High St. 
LOS ANUELES, CAL. 



YOU SHOULD GO TO 

CAMP 
CORONADO 

. . . The Society Center of the Pacific 
Coast. Reached in four hours from 
Los Angeles on the regular trains or 
still quicker on the 

CAMP 
CORONADO FLYER 

Leave Los Angeles 7.06 a. in. 

Arrive Ban Diego 10.+. r > a. in. 

Returning Special 

Leaves San DiegO r>.1(> p. ill. 

Arrives Los Angeles s.r>() p. m. 

Only passengers for Coronado Beach 
carried on this Special. 

ROUND TRIP $4.00 

Ticket Office Second and Spring Sts. 




A Tempting 
Proposition 

TEN-CENT OIL STOCK 

A better one is a $2( 00 Life Insur- 
ance for$15 a year in the popular 

Order of The Iroquois 

incorporated under the laws of 
the State of New York. Kor par- 
ticulars and literature send card 
to r. M. CHAPMAN 

250 N. Union Ave., L. A. 

#»- Deputies make good pay 
Several wanted for this territory. 



The 

Summer 
Man 



g is as much of a necessity as the summer i 

% girl, and needs a proportionate amount | 

g of attention. See our novelty flannel J 

\ negligee suits, as low as J 1 0.00, and £ 

2 all the fixings that go well with them. ; 

I I 

LONDON CLOTHING COMPANY | 

HARRIS K FRANK, Props 

117-125 North Spring Street f 

£\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\v\\\\\\\\\\\\\\^ 

All We Ask is Comparison 

of Goods and Prices 

n"w Carpets and Rugs 

Suits Hundreds of others and will suit you 

3x7 Shades only 45 Cents 

I T JViADTlN 351-3-5 SO. IVheelChairs 
1. 1 . ITl/\K 1 11^ SPRING ST. soldorrenlerl 

Furs stored, made to order and remodeUd 
D. Bonoff, 247 S. Broadway, opp. City Hall 




Western Graphic 
Z5/?e Country f R_ ouad 

: ^ ^ ^ Notes on the Progress of Ovir Country ^ ^ ^ v« 



NEWS of new water discoveries continue to 
reach the city. Underground streams are 
being developed all over Southern Califor- 
nia. Years of normal rainfall this water may not 
be needed, but it will be a comfort to know it 
exists. 

This has been the worst summer for heat the 
Eastern States have experienced since records 
were kept. The daily reports of deaths, prostra- 
tions and sufferings are appalling. 

3 

How Southern California is growing is shown 
by the reports of increase in assessments made by 
the county assessors. The year ending last March 
was certainly a prosperous one for this section, 
taking the industries into consideration. 

San Diego is making large shipments of lob- 
sters and sardines to this city and San Pedro, 
where a canning factory exists. 

t?^ 

Still another corporation has been formed to 
bring power into Los Angeles. This last is 
known as the Zombro Power Company, and the 
source of its supply will be the Santa Ana river. 

A good example of what oil will do to lay 
dust can be seen on ungraded Date street, near the 
Southern Pacific railroad. This used to be as 
dusty as any place in the country, hilt a soaking 
with crude oil has made it as clean as a graded 
street. 

3 J* & 

Redondo has had such crowds the past few 
weeks that the railroads and hotels have found it 
difficult to give a satisfactory service. There is 
no doubt this pleasant seaside resort has attrac- 
tions and advantages which will insure its steady 
growth and improvement. 

One native of Los Angeles has a remarkable 
blending of different nationalities in his veins, 
tracing his geneology back to 1760. The follow- 
ing were the nationalities represented in his an- 
cestry: Two Californians, three Spanish, one 
Hebrew, one German, one Frenchman, two 
Italians, one Greek, two citizens of the United 
States. 

ti$^ 

The Klondike is surely sending a great deal 
of gold into the United States. Recent steamers 
arriving have averaged a million dollars each. 
This money is likely to make products, and es- 
pecially real estate, higher in value. Los Angeles 
is a favorite residence place for people who have 
"made their stake," and will be even more so in 
the future. 

Sixteen hundred luckless horses are to be at 
once shipped to China from California on account 
of the German army. More consignments will 
follow. A year or two ago the horses of Oregon 
and Washington were being shot for their hides 
or canned for European' consumption. Now good 
horses bring a fair price. 

■ < ,< .< 

The pleasant news has reached here that the 
Paris Exposition has awarded the first premium 
to the California State Commission for the best 
collection of citrus fruits. This is a high compli- 
ment, for doubtless most leading citrus growing 
countries were represented at the Exposition. A 
fine collection of California fruit in glass is to 
be sent from here to the Buffalo Exposition. 

Two important improvements have ben recom- 
mended by the City Council. One is the opening 
of San Pedro street to Aliso street; another the 
opening of East Sixth street across the river to 
Boyle Heights. Both improvements are needed, 
but both will doubtless be opposed. Los Angeles 
has a spirit of progress we can be proud of, but 
the Silurian is in evidence here as elsewhere. The 
Silurian spirit in San Francisco kept that city back 
fully a generation. It is based on the Chinese 
idea that "what was good enough for my ances- 
tors is good enough for me." 

The Sixth street opening would at once develop 
a part of Los Angeles only a few minutes ride 
from the business center of the city. Manufac- 
tures are already occupying the low lands, and 
the heights are as pleasant as any portion of Los 
Angeles for residence purposes. 

The San Pedro street opening would be a boon 
for business men and add greatly to property 
values. Probably property aligning the improve- 
ments would soon double in value. 

It is said that in Boston the cows originally 
made the streets — later accepted by the city. 
When some of the streets of Los Angeles are ex- 
amined the conclusion is inevitable that possibly 
we might h~ro bettered ourselves by trusting to 
the i^.vlne instinct. A large section of Los An- 



geles will eventually have to be reconstructed, 
not necessarily in this generation, judging from 
past experiences, but before the city will take 
the front rank it deserves among American cities. 

Nearly all the larger cities of the United States 
have repositories for the many curiosities dis- 
covered in the vicinity or acquired abroau. South- 
ern California is especially rich in relics of his- 
torical interest — a fact which visitors to Eastern 
and European museums cannot fail to take note 
of. Santa Catalina Island has a relic department 
in nearly every great museum in the country. 
The islands and the California mainland, up to a 
century or so ago, had a population which has 
been estimated by some as running well up to a 
million. Nearly all that is left of many of these 
primitive peoples is what the antiquarian has been 
able to dig from their graves and find of their 
humble household effects. The collection at the 
National Museum at Washington from Catalina is 
very interesting. 

A collection of the relics of these aboriginal 
Californians ought to have been made in Los An- 
geles, and it is not yet too late. It may be added 
that the Pacific Coast is rich in the fossils and 
fauna of bygone ages. The State University is 
now acquiring a number of skeletons from Oregon 
which show conclusively the Webfoot State had 
an era in its history when the climate resembled 
that of Central Africa. The University is securing 
from Oregon remains of many animals, like the 
rhinoceros and the elephant, which will be very 
interesting to me student of natural history. 

Some of our oil men or osiers who have found 
health and wealth in Southern California may see 
fit to endow a museum which will preserve for all 
time much of interest, soon, otherwise, likely to 
be lost. 

t$ 

The development of Hawaii and the Philippines 
means much for the Pacific Coast. For at least 
the next thirty years it will tax our merchants 
and manufacturers to supply the demands upon 
them. No doubt many people were sincere in 
their opposition to the acquisition of the islands. 
It is therefore curious to quote from a speech 
made by one of the South's greatest orators. Hon. 
John C. Calhoun, in the United States Senate in 
February, 1847. Mr. Calhoun might be address- 
ing a Bryan audience of 1900, so far as his argu- 
ment goes, but who would now agree with the 
statesman of fifty years ago? This quotation, 
taken from an old school reader, refers to the 
acquisition of California from Mexico, made at 
the time of the Mexican war. 

"Suppose we do go on and at the end of the 
fourth or fifth campaign, then comes the great 
question. What are we to do with the territory? 
Can you incorporate it in your union? Can we 
hold them as subjugated provinces? It would be 
fatal to our institutions; it would involve most 
enormous expense, and a vast increase of execu- 
tive power. What would be the result when you 
reached the end of the fourth or fifth campaign? 
A debt of three or four hundred million dollars! 
You will have free trade put an end to for one 
generation, and for generations to come, in my 
opinion! And then, what an awful, what an ir- 
reparable sacrifice of human life! If we incorpo- 
rate licr (Mexican California) we are destroyed, 
if not our institutions perish. I put a graver 
question and I appeal to the conscience of every 
man here: Can we, with any regard to the opin- 
ions and judgment of a Christian people, pursue 
that war? (The Mexican war.) Is there any 
man here who will give for California the lives of 
16,000 of our people or 30,000,000 of dollars? No, 
sir. There is not one." California, in spite of 
Mr. Calhoun, is a loyal state of the Union, and 
the products of the southern counties alone are 
valued at more than $30,000,000 annually. 

HERBERT. 

^^^^^rTf^^^^W^^yT&^^r^y^^^^^ 



Longo 



The Ladies' and Gentlemen's 

Has now the handsomest establishment of 
its kind in Southern California at 

222 S* Broadway 

It is in accord with the reputation of his 
Garments. They are the recognized 
Standard 

Longo Gentlemen's 'Tailor 




Absolute 
I Guarantee 
Against Loss 

THE OROANIZERS 
OF THE 

OPHIR 



OIL COMPANY 

Have arranged with the California 
Safe Deposit and Trust Company of 
San Francisco, to hold sufficient secur- 
ities in trust for the purchasers of 
Ophir Oil stock to 

Insure Holders of this Stock 
Against Loss .... 

That is to say, if the Ophir Oil Com- 
pany shall fail to produce oil in pay- 
ing quantities sufficient to bring its 
stock to par value ( one dollar per 
share;, purchasers will receive back, 
with accrued interest, the entire 
amount paid in by them for stock. 

The securities thus held in trust are 
adequate, and an investment in Ophir 
Oil Stock is as secure as a United 
States Government Bond, and vastly 
superior to deposits in Banks of Sav- 
ings, for the reason that it combines 

Absolute Security 
with Immense 
Possibilities 
of Gain 

when oil is struck. There is no "read- 
ing between the lines" in this propo- 
sition. Whatever happens to the 
Ophir Oil Company your investment 
is safe. You cannot lose. Only a 
limited amount of this Secured Stock 
is offered for sale. Its propertv con- 
sists of 800 acres in Coalinga District, 
Fresno county, being all of section 23 
and % of section 14, township 21 south, 
range IS east, M. D. M. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

WAK REN G1I.I.ELEN 

President Broadway Hank, Los Angeles 
JOHN W. A. OFF 

Cashier State Bank and Trust Co., Los 

Angeles 
JOHN MASON GARDINER" 

Engineer and General Contractor of Pub 

lie Works, Phoenix, A. T., and I<os Angeles 
JOHN MARTIN 

President Martin Pipe and Foundry Co. 

Mgr Stanley Electric CO., Kan Francisco 
GEORGE KENT i OOPF.R 

Manager Occidental Hotel, San Francisco 
NATHANIEL J. M ANSON 

Attorney-at-I.aw, mii Franc sco 
H. K. HURLBUT 

Fifteen y< ars In charge of Advertising 

Department, San Francisco i all 



Ophir Oil Co. 

Los Angeles Office 

435 Douglas Bldg. 

San Francisco Office, 

Room 14, Fifth floor, Mills Building 



Western Graphic 




Under the Derrick 



' I ' HE western extension of t ho Los Angeles 
J field is still a puzzling question among oil 
men. The late opening of a few producing 
wells to the southwest of the Urea ranch towards 
the ocean gives promise that an anticlinal extends 
to the southwest, and its exact locality been de- 
termined in a few cases — whether its exact trend 
has been fixed or not is yet to he determined. 
Pioneer work is now in progress which will settle 
this question within a few weeks, and it the re- 
sult is favorable it will probably extend the field 
to the ocean in the vicinity of Ballona. To the 
northwest of the Baptist college there has perhaps 
been more unsuccessful pioneering than in any 
other direction in the Los Angeles field. 'Pest, 
wells have been put down over a strip of territory 
several miles across and reaching out into the 
mountains north of Sherman, and while oil has 
been discovered in some of them, in no instance 
has the pump been put to work to any great ex- 
tent. West of Western avenue considerable 



canyon. The pressure of gas in these localities 
seems to he heavier and more permanent than in 
any other field this side of the mountains, and it 
would not be strange if it could be utilized for 
fuel. 

•.«* ■< jl 

The threat of the proprietor of the California 
Oil Exchange to establish an oil bucket shop for 
the purpose of accommodating every one who 
can raise "two bits" to guess on the price of oil 
stocks, will not strike much terror to oil men. 
The desertion of all respectable brokers from the 
California Exchange robs that institution of the 
power to affect the price of stocks, and leaves the 
market in the hands of men whose business in- 
terests are in line with genuine oil development, 
and a decided advance in prices may now be an- 
ticipated. With an increase in the number of men 
who desire to buy stocks, which will come when 
the rush to the seashore is over, oil stocks will 
undoubtedly regain all the loss which lie d i 



\ 

T 



THE NEW KING AND QUEEN OF ITALY. 

Victor Emmannel III, the new king of Italy, is barely 5 feet tall, and the new queen, 
who was Princess Helene of Montenegro, is at least I" feci, tall and stands a head taller than 
her royal husband. She is a tine musician, an excellent horsewoman, a good shot ami a 
versatile linguist. She lias been called the most beautiful woman ill Europe. The young 




king is literary in liis tastes and lias (lie reputation nf being one of tlx- liest informed young 
men in Europe. His hobby is collecting coins Kroin early childhood he showed n Strong 
sense of his position and an ambition to do everything thai pertained to his ollice. however 
distasteful. He insisted on doing his lull duty as a soldier, and up to the end of last year 
he WM lieutenant general in command of the Tenth division As a commanding odieei If 
haa the reputation of being a strict disciplinarian He is set in his ways and ohsl mate at timet 



heavy oil, which comes from near the surf .ee, 
has been found, accompanied by some gas, but 
the trouble has been that there is so much water 
that it has interfered with the profitable pumping 
of the wells. Some of the wells in this vicinity 
are being sunk to greater depths than those near 
the Baptist college, and it is hoped that a better 
oil sand may be found. Still further out, on the 
Brea ranch and on Senator Cole's property, a 
number of wellB are being drilled and some oil 
developed. Those on the Brea ranch have struck 
Considerable heavy oil, but as yet the pump has 
not been put at work, although drilling con- 
tinues. 

Jt Jt jH 

There is talk of utilizing the large flow of gas 
being found in various portions of the Fullcrton 
field for the generation of power. Late develop- 
ment in several wells gives reason to believe that 
the volume of gas is extensive enough to supply 
fuel for the generation of power sufficient to be 
transmitted to Los Angeles. That this flow of 
gas Is lasting is shown in the gas well that was 
opened in the La flabra valley about a year ago. 
It is still a good producer, and lately the Inter- 
national Oil Company has struck a good flow of 
gas In its well some six miles east, toward Fuller- 
ton. The Liberty Oil Company hits also found gas 
In its well three miles from the month of SOQUel 



season has occasioned. A large majority of ihe 
companies whose shaics have been going down 
for some weeks are entirely solvent, and many of 
them paying dividends, which alone make them 
worth the highest price ever realized for their 
stocks, and this abnormal dullness cannot continue 
long. While the bear raid on the stocks is some- 
what exasperating to people who are familiar 
with the true value of oil stocks, its effects will 
soon pass away, and such properties again be sold 
upon their merits. 

Even sooner: Foster — "Do all your employees 
drop their tools the instant the whistle blows?" 
Ployer — "Oh, no, not all of them. The more or- 
derly ones have their tools put away before that 
time." — Bazar. 

■* ..< jl 

"Strike!'' I he frail girl gazed steadily at the, 
big strapping fellow with the oak stick. "Strike!" 
Again her high-pitched voice rang out. "Strike!" 
This time he dropped the stick and ran. It was 
not a threatened tragedy; it was merely a girl in 
the grand stand acting as umpire. Chicago News. 

*«" *»"• *■ 

The man who carves inscriptions on tombstones 
is always in hard lines. 



■ \ 



MUSIC AND ART ANNOUNCEMENTS 

FREDERICK STEVENSON 



VOICE 

COMPOSITION 
TUEOKV 



Phone Main 8S."> 



230 Hkllman Block 



ARNOLD 



K R A U S S 



soi. uis 1 AND VIOLIN TEACHER 

Pupil ol Cesar Thomson 
Studio: 807 W. Seventh at. T«l. Green 1568 



H A R L E Y 



HAMILTON 



CONCERT VIOLINIST AN'» TEACHKK 
Ensemble playing a specialty. 
Musical Director I.os Angeles Theatre. 
Pupil of Emile Sauret, Loudon, and Slmoneiti, London. 

8tudio, 3J0-321 Blanchard Building 



CHARLES F. 



E D S O N 



BASSO CANTANTE 

Kngugements Accepted for 

Concert, okatorio Studio 
and Opera ... 611 WITMEK STREET 

Telephone James 78 



MORTON F. MASON 

TeHclier of Piano, Organ and Harmony 

Organist Pasadena Presbyterian Church 
Studio: Blanchard building Residence: 250 State Street 

Los Angeles Pasadena 

MISS MIRIAM bTbARNES 

I'iano Soloist and Teacher of the Piano 
Pupil of 

llerr Thllo Becker 253 SOUTH GRAND AVE 

MRS. LUCIA M. BURNETT 

PIANO SOLOIST AND TEACHER 

Pupil Wm. Sherwood, Chicago lOOfi W. Washington St. 



CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

HARMONY COUNTERPOINT 
COMPOSITION VIOLIN 

8tudio Tajo Block, cor. 1st Jt Brd'y Residence 632 Burlington 



MRS. J. 



M. 



JONES 



TEACHER OF THE HARP 

Address care of So. Cal. Music Co. RESIDENCE: 
216 W. Third St., Los Angeles Lincoln Park 



MADAME MARIE HUNI 

TEACHER OK SINGING 

Classical Music a Specialty. 
Studio, 628 S. Hill Street Los Angeles 



D. H. MORRISON 



VOICE BUILDING 

77 and 7f Potomac Block 



Los Angeles, Cal. 



MISS MAUDE PRIEST 

GUITAR LESSONS 
Specialties— Technique, Rich Tone. Execution. Rapid Progress 
Pupil M. S. Arevalo STUDIO: 452% So: Broadway 
Room 25 

a7~ WILLHARTITZ 

Piano, Harmony, Composition, Etc. 
LosANOKLES 311 BLANCHARD MUSIC AND ART BLDG. 



EDWARD S. WARREN 

MANDOLIN AND GUITAR 
STUDIO— 314 Blanchard Music Hall 
Mornings at Pasadena Directoi Throop Institute 

Afternoons at Los Angeles Mandolin and Guitar Club 

ROLLA E. GARDN E R 

BANJO, MANDOLIN. GUITAR 

String Orchestra siunio. 244 South Hill St 



BluiiclioTti Hall 



223 5. Broadway 

Opp. City Hall 

Building devoted to Music and Art. 
Auditorium, seating 800, can be engaged for Music- 
ales, Receptions. Lectures, Dances, etc. 
Rehearsal and Lecture Rooms for rent. 
Forty Studios— single and en suite. 
Public Art Gallery open daily, 1 to 4 p. m. 
For any information apply to 

F. W. BLANCHARD 



1 



LADIES 

Have your Freckles Removed 

By mine the Original Freckle Salve 

PREPARED ONLY BY 

O. F\ HEINZEMAIN 

S33 North CHEMIST 

Main Street V.»> Price SO CtS 



To the Deaf 

A .ich lady, cured of her deafness and noises in 
the head by Dr. Nicholson's Artificial Ear Drums, 
gave $100,000 to his Institute, so that deaf people 
unable to procure the Ear Drums, may have them 
free. Address No. 532c, The Nicholson Institute, 
780 Eighth Avenue, New York. 5-7-01 



Western Graphic 



Whatever legislation may be adopted by Con- 
gress should make provision for preventing the 
requisition of more than 160 acres of oil territory 
by one person, and make the same provisions in 
reference to this matter that are now in force un- 
der the homestead laws. Under the latter a per- 
son is confined to one location and after making 
such location is debarred from making others. 
Such a provision would prevent speculation in 
these claims, and cut the ground from under the 
gentlemen who make a business of making loca- 
tions purely for the purpose of selling out. 

jt jt jt 

Congress undoubtedly wouul be willing to adopt 
any measure which meets the approval of the oil 
men, providing it does not give opportunity for 
a monopoly of public lands on the pretext of de- 
veloping oil. The purpose and aim of our home- 
stead and mining laws is to prevent monopoly in 
land, and it makes no difference whether this 
monopoly comes in the line of agriculture or min- 
eral locations. The reason why the law intro- 
duced during the last session of Congress failed 
was that it made the acquisition of large tracts 
easy. When the effect of recent decisions of the 
courts are fully understood by our national legis- 



lators, and the injustice of allowing holders of lieu 
script to oust oil men from claims just on the 
eve of the discovery of oil made clear, they will 
change the law so as to remedy the evil, but the 
new legislation must be of such a nature that a 
new set of speculators shall not be allowed to camp 
on the same ground from which the original ones 
have been ousted. 

Jt jt ,4 

The extent of speculation in placer claims that 
have been made during the past few months is 
known to but few people. Groups of eight have 
been running over the mountains wherever there 
is the least sign of oil, making locations to the 
extent of thousands of acres, with no other pur- 
pose but to sell out for a little money to large cor- 
porations who desire oil land. These locations 
have often been made the basis for the organiza- 
tion of wildcat oil companies, which in turn have 
made money in the sale of stock whose only value 
is a remote possibility that oil may at some future 
period be discovered on the property. Legitimate 
oil exploitation has been hurt by such methods, 
and there should be a stop put to them at the 
earliest moment possible. 




Music and Art 

Criticism and Comment 15he Doings of Artistic Folk 




(Continued from last week.) 

IN THE more recent times there has been a 
departure from the old contention that the 
purpose of Art was to idealize and to beautify; 
to transfigure barren reality, and that ugly things 
should be avoided. Vereschagin, with .his grue- 
some pictures of battlefields, with the maimed and 
dying as the points of interest, has his counter- 
part in the field of music in the composer who aims 
at verity and "realism." Pure or absolute music 
has come to appeal rather to the few than the 
many because of this modern striving for "illus- 
trative" music, the music of the programist and 
the sticker on of labels. The extremists in this 
modern departure were determined to put the bel 
canto on a high shelf; they questioned the legiti- 
macy of all polyphonic songs and ensemble sing- 
ings. These are the persons who would hang Bel- 
lini and Donizetti on the same gallows with Ha- 
man; who can only see through the ultra-modern 
glasses which demand the utmost that is techni- 
cally possible. Fortunately these people over-reach- 
ed themselves; sensible men realized that the Art 
was progressing crau-like. It was soon realized 
that although the old Italian opera was based on 
a trashy libretto, the harmonization crude and 
thin, and the orchestration of woeful paucity, that 
on the top of it all, when properly performed, there 
was the glorious exploitation of the human voice, 
(he beautiful exemplification of the Divine gift to 
man. The modern tendency was to sacrifice the 
voice to the dramatic demands of the score, but 
when, as in Tannhauser and Lohengrin, tne ravish- 
ing melody peeps out, with what entrancing joy 
Wolfram's song' and "Euch Lueften, die mein 
Klagen" are heard and how they impress the audi- 
tor. The disciples outran the Master. Wagner's 
mission on earth, as it was that of Berlioz, lay in 
the development of orchestral possibilities, but 
they did but little more than to make use of hints 
that Beethoven and Mozart had left behind them. 
In the battle between melodiousness and a photo- 
graphic expression of realities the former is reap- 
ing the benefit of a sensible reaction and a saner 
realization of the purposes of music. The mon- 
strosities which Richard Strauss has perpetrated 
in the name of Art. the insane quest for the literal 
interpretation of Nature in her ugliest forms, 
which has not even the excuse given by the Rus- 
sian painter that he made his pictures horrible so 
that the world would weary of war, cannot live; 
in a few years they will be curiosities, they will 
possess interest mainly for those who would learn 
how the limits of orchestral legitimacy have been 
overstepped. Beautiful music is that, therefore, 
which being good in conformity to the tenets laid 
down by all great writers as necessary, has also 
the attribute of melodiousness and euphony, and 
which is "pretty" in that it is pleasing to the ear. 
Not to the ear of the musically deaf, but to those 
in whom the power of hearing has been augmented 
by judicious training and the experience that 
comes with the intelligent hearing of good music. 
It was Berlioz who wrote: "Music, unquestionably, 
has by no means the exclusive aim to be pleasant 
to the ear, but still a thousand times less that of 
being disagreeable to it, of torturing and mishan- 
dling it. I am one of the same flesh and blood as 
other men; and I demand that some considera- 
tion be shown to my susceptibilities in the treat- 
ment of mv ear, that thing so cloutish yet so dear 
to me." E. F. KUBEL. 

jl ,«* jt 

Mr. .J. Bond Francisco and wife will leave next 
week for a short visit in New York. Mr. Francisco 
will take a number of his new sketches with him. 
and on reaching home will take up his work again 
in his conservatory of music and art. 

There is some talk of a string quartette this 
coming season. Prof. Krauss is so crowded with 
his teaching and orchestra work, that he does not 



think he can devote the time necessary for the 
work, while Mr. Francisco finds it difficult to se- 
cure time for himself and the other instruments, 
but hopes to arrange for a short season. 

Musical circles have been very quiet, with the 
exception of informal affairs at the beaches, where 
are to be found the greater number of musicians 
The mountains are well patronized this year by 
artistic souls, and the canvases of the coming win- 
ter will be the better for it, while the rippling 
brook and the song of birds will echo from the 
studios with truer ring. 

jt j» jt 

Park Band Concerts 

Westlake Park, Sunday, August 19, 1900, 2:30 
p. m.: 

March — Hands Across the Sea Sousa 

Waltzes — Marien Eilenberg 

Selection — Maritana Wallace 

Mexicana — La Rose .- . Reiter 

Potpourri of Old Songs arr. Claus 

Sextette from Lucia Donizetti 

Intermezzo — Calveria Mascagni 

Cornet Solo— The Holy City Adams 

Y. Escobar. 

Operatic Medley — Peace Jubilee arr. Beyer 

Recollections of the War Laurendeau 

jt jt Jt 

Hollenbeck Park. Sunday. August 19, 1900, 7:30 
p. m.: 

March — Stars and Stripes Sousa 

Waltz— The Charlatan Sousa 

Selection — Bohemian Girl Balfe 

Intermezzo — Cupid's Pleadings Voelker 

Medley — Up-to-date Mackie 

Selection — The Huguenots Meyerbeer 

Waltz— Love's Awakening Karger 

Medley Overture — The Hummer Mackie 

Clorindy Marion 

March Potpourri Beyer 

America. 

Green and yellow Traction cars run direct to 
park. 

*« .< .< 

Literary Gossip 

Conducted by^^^Garner Curra.n 

FOR the Sake of the Duchess," by S. 
Walker, is a stirring, exciting tale after 
the pattern of those stories which have 
to do with the times of Richelieu, when royster- 
ing young blades whose fortunes had been spent 
at the gambling table did all sorts of impossible 
things at the behest of the cardinal, in return 
for which they received a pardon, a wife and a 
lot of money. This book deals with the Vicomte 
Audrian de Championnet, a noted French duelist, 
who agrees to kill a man the regent, Louis 
Philippe, afterward King of France, wants out of 
the way. The vicomte is the double of the in- 
tended victim, Silvain, whose uncle, the Chevalier 
de Cheverny, has some papers the regent is de- 
sirous of obtaining, and the scheme is that the 
vicomte shall personate Silvain at the cheval- 
ier's chateau. Silvain has been in the bastile 
some years and as his uncle, whose heir he was, 
had not seen him meantime the deception was 
easy enough. 

To encourage the vicomte in the undertaking 
the beautiful Duchesse de Berri, the regent's 
daughter, makes love to him and promises to 
make him her husband as soon as the coveted 
papers are secured; so the victim is inveigled into 
a duel and pierced through. The vicomte is re- 



Western Graphic 



7 



ceived by the chevalier and the former promptly 
falls in love with Aurelie, daughter of the house 
and Silvain's cousin. 

The regent, the Duchesse de Berri and; the 
Abbe Dubois visit the chateau of the Chevalier 
de Cheverny where the vicomte, masquerading as 
Silvain, is in possession, the chevalier being dead; 
Silvain turns up, having been wounded merely, 
and is thrust into a room in the tower by the 
vicomte; the Abbe Dubois insults Aurelie and is 
punished by the vicomte; 'Silvain escapes and 
meeting lae abbe is slain by the priest, being 
killed sure enough this time; the duchesse and 
Aurelie quarrel and fight with swords, the latter 
being wounded, and finally, to wind up the mess, 
the vicomte, in the presence of all, confesses his 
deception and hands the papers to Aurelie, who 
burns them before the angry regent's eyes. 

Naturally enough the vicomte is sent to prison, 
where he is visited by the Ducnesse de Berri, who 
arranges to marry him to spite Aurelie. but after 
the ceremony is performed the bride lifts her 
vail and discloses the features of Aurelie. The 
vicomte is pardoned, the regent having lost a bet 
on a cockfight, the winner naming the vicomte's 
release as a satisfactory settlement; the duchesse 
is furious, but helpless and the curtain is lowered 
upon them all. p 
.<t 

John J. Jennings has, through the house of G. 
W. Dillingham, published the "Widow Magoogin 
Tales." Those who like Irish dialect stories will 
find them entertaining. The widow expesses her 
opinion on all the topics of the day. and there is 
a great deal of truth in her remarks. These have 
before made their appearance in the St. Louis 
Critic, the New York Sunday Mercury and the 
St. Louis Post-Dispatch. "J. J. J.." as Mr. Jen- 



I NEVER knew before how famous I was get- 
ting — neither did anybody else — until I noticed 
list Sunday how I had set the fashion for the 
Times. Perhaps nobody has discovered it, but this 
society column isn't a column at all. It is a myth. 
'1 he editor says he doesn't care anything at all 
about societv, all he wants is a dissertation on 
swimming, the Chinese question, Paris fashions or 
hot weather dishes with a few "goings on" at the 
end to make it circulate among the butterflies. 

That was exactly what the Times did last Sun- 
day with the beaches. The editor told the other 
editor to go into his upstairs office and write up 
Redondo and Santa Monica. For Redondo he 
might get up a yarn about fishing lines or any 
old lines, and about Santa Monica he could write 
up the sun, moon and stars. He could bring in the 
ocean if necessary and if there weie two or three 
Chinamen in sight he might drop 'em in. That's 
just what the under editor did, and when he came 
to the end he raked up a few personals just as I 
do and called it "A page at the beaches." 

Now that I am the leader I will have every- 
thing my own way hereafter and leterrip. A sort 
of Pennsylvania Dutch way of "Go it Sal; I'll hold 
your bonnet." Only my name isn't that and I can 
hold my own bonnet, thanks. 

First: The people who are at Catalina — I mean 
the society folk of Los Angeles — are mostly the 
coming set or rather you might say the High 
school set. The fraternities and sororities are 
nearly all there, for tents, hammocks, banjos and 
the pavilion have all the charms in the summer 
world for the youth of that age. Last year the 
fraternity boys had high jinks generally and on 
one occasion were requested to leave pretty per- 
emptorily. This year, I believe, the behavior is 
improved, the only relaxation the boys permit 
themselves being a ducking for each new "kid" 
that comes over — from the end of the wharf. The 
boys are laying for each newcomer and find in this 
diversion that peculiar unction to the soul that 
the growing man is heir to in the ravages of his 
youth, in the accomplishment of a prank. 

It is a matter of philosophy altogether and the 
rest of the world might as well grin and bear it. 
It is inevitable. 

They say Catalina had 10,000 people on the Isl- 
and last Sunday. However, on the question in 
hand — Los Angeles society people — the proportion 
was not large. The Island is strictly cosmopoli- 
tan and the main street might almost be a re- 
vised Midway Plaisance. But the I>os Angeles so- 
ciety people who have gone there to stay — are riot 
there in bulk. 

An omniscient eye over Redondo at this partic- 
ular moment would not give a fair resume to the 
world of its status, for sports at other resorts have 
thinned the ranks of society folk for the time. 
Redondo started in well this summer. The im- 
provement company are a set of enterprising men 
and they spent a lot of money to boom their re- 
sort and it is therefore right and meet that they 
should have met with the success they had. They 
drew society in crowds for a day or two at a time 
— to golf, to dance ,and thus for short periods Los 
Angeles swelldom came and went, a set of veri- 
table living pictures, appearing with a sudden flash 
and then as suddenly wiped off the canvas. A 
number of the younger set of society are in resi- 



nings is known in the literary world, has made 
quite a reputation as a numerous writer, and 
those who like to enjoy a quiet life can do no 
better than by reading the "Widow Magoogin." 

A half dozen short stories, one of which had 
previously appeared in print, form a little volume 
called "The Repentant Magdalen and Other 
Stories," by Isabel Fisk. published by Zimmerman. 
"Tatters" is a sorrowful little tale of a girl and 
her lover, told from the point of view of her little 
dog. It is cleverly and effectively done. In one 
or two of the other stories the plot is interesting 
and well planned. The author has a fondness for 
long words, a harmless taste, but when the words 
are unfamiliar, it might save her readers perplexi- 
ty if she would look up their meaning in the dic- 
tionary before using them. Some of her well- 
sounding combinations of syllables we are inclined 
to think have not been garnered yet by the lexico- 
graphers. A portrait of the author serves as front- 
ispiece for a prettily gotten up little book. 

A charming little romance is "Monsieur Beau- 
claire." by Mr. Booth Tarkington. (McClure, 
Phillips & Co.) A light and dainty trifle set in 
the atmosphere of those glorious days of sword 
knots and furbelows, patches and brocades, when 
fiddles twanged to the stately dancing of the 
bucks and the fine ladies, and Beau Nash held 
sovereign sway in the pump room at Bath. Lots 
of love making and brilliant sword play, witty 
and unforced dialogue and a series of climaxes 
that are admirably dramatic are skillfully put to- 
gether in a manner as happy as that of Mr. An- 
thony Hope in his palmiest days. The illustra- 
tions by Mr. C. D. Williams and the decorative 
designs by Mr. Charles Edward Hooper are es- 
pecially noteworthy. 

utterflies 

3 in the ^ Gay 3 Life 

dence there and they have helped things out won- 
dei fully, but for anything like permanency Redon- 
do was not its name, but by its other names it 
was quite as much a success. 

Santa Monica, next in the procession, has had 
rather an odd experience. It had no phantasma- 
goiia of comings and departures, brilliant descents 
and then oblivion. On the contrary Los Angeles 
society held itself almost entirely aloof in the early 
part of the summer and July looked like complete 
extermination. But by the first of August society 
suddenly "moved" and it seemed that with one im- 
pulse its most aristocratic element went down to 
the Arcadia Hotel in a body. The whole of this 
month and part of next the same element will hold 
sway — a sort of restful repose, not much coming 
and going but a settled residence. Strange to say. 
the young people are very scarce. Tennis natur- 
ally took its youthful representation down with it 
on Saturday and for a period of a week or ten 
days there will be no lack of the stereotyped sum- 
mer flirtation at the old stand-by resort. But this 
is only a circumstance. Santa Monica on the map 
of the social calendar boasts but fe